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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1906)"

D 2007 120EEST A R A p?v 

California State Library i.-v^-».a'*. j. • 



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Accession JVo. 



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ESTABLISHKD JULY 20, IBM 




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Price 10 cents 



SAN FRANGISGO, GAL, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1906 



$4 per year 




ST^ 






4^RA 




Anjfoni I, 



J*3S' 







California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 



Capital, Fully Paid 
Total Assets - - 



- $2,000,000 
10,000,000 



A General Banking Business Conducted. 
Savings and Checking Accounts Received. 
Interest Paid on Deposits. 

MAIN OFFICE-CORNER MONTGOMERY AND CALIFORNIA STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

WEST END BRANCH— 1531 Devisadero St., near Post.. 
MISSION BRANCH— 92? Valencia St., near Twenty-first,, 
UPTOWN BRANCH-1850 Geary St., West, of Fillmore. 

DAVID F. WALKER, President. 
J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 



Union Lumber 
Company 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER 

Railroad Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles, 

Split Shakes, Etc. Main Office, 206-207-208 

Crocker Bldg. Telephone Private Ex. 624. 

Yards and Planing Mills 

Sixth and Channel Streets, 

San Francisco, Cat. 



e. 



^ 



Malthoid 
Roofing--- 
P. & B. Goods 



For temporary or permanent buildings— 
quickly laid by anyone — waterproof, fire 
resisting and a durable roof. Sales de- 
partment in San Francisco at 1306 Post 
Street. Factory uninjured, orders deliv- 
ered immediately. Address 



THE PARAFFINE PAINT CO. 

MAIN OFFICE — Union Savings Bank 'Blfg. 
Oakland, Gal. 

Telephone Oakland 7567 



TRY OUR 



Stanford - Richmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District, New- 
castle, N. S. W., Australia. 

INTENSE HEAT, LITTLE ASH, AND NO 

CLINKER. DIRECT FROM THE MINE 

TO THE CONSUMER. 

Sold to trade only. Ask your agent for it 
and see that you get it. 



Richmond Coal Co., Agents 



About Your Trip East 

When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall I go?" 
Let me offer a suggestion. The Missouri 
Pacific operates both Pullman and Tourist 
Sleepers through from California to Kansas 
City, St. Louis and Chicago without change 
of cars, which carry you through the world- 
famed scenery of Colorado by daylight. 
Dining and cafe cars on all through trains, 
service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and hand- 
somely illustrated books of travel. 



W. J. SHOTWELL, General Agent. 
1070 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAL. 



G. Lederer 



Hair Dresser 



is now located at 2271 CALIFORNIA ST. 



Hair-dressing. Shampoos. Wigs, Toupees. 



GERMEA 

FOR 

BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE COMPANY, AGENTS 



O. F. Willey 
Company 



Estab- 
lished 
1855 



Have re-opened at 

19 Fell Street, 

Near Market Street. 
San Francisco Tel. Special 336 



165-167 13th St. 

Bet. Madison and Jackson Sts. 
Oakland Tel. Oakland 8062 



With a full line o: 



Surreys, Runabouts, Etc. 



COME AND SEE 



DR. H. I. JONES 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, late Starr King 
building, will resume practice at his residence. 
228 East Sixteenth St.,Oakland. Phone East 82. 



N 



t4ta 




News Better 

(California AOiurtiscr. 




VOL. UCXI 



San Francisco, Cal., July 7, 1906. 



No. 26 



The SAN FRANCISCO SEMI'S LETTER . pnxrd and rubhhed eeerr Saturday br iK, 
FNataMlf. FannVtiek Mamott. San Fraaoaco. Cat . temporary owe* 90S Lincoln Aw., Alameda, Cal. 
Fannit at AUaaeda Pc-tcAce a* record clarr matte. 

New York 0»or---(tehrr» irrformatKrrt may be obtained rrganing wr-cnpooct* and ad*rrh«nst 
206 Bcoodw.,. C. C Mutphy. Reprerentae.e London Oftcr— M) Comhil. E. C . England. 

George Street * Co 

Al md itrjna. aattoutKemeott, raining, cemmemal and financial newt note*, aderrrjaefrienu of other 
clatter intended for pubEcanon. in the current number of the NEWS LETTER ihould be rent to the 
Aimed* o0Ke not later than Friday momiog. 



Announcement 



The Business Office of the NEWS LETTER is located at 1 121 
L-aguna Street. San Francisco. Address all communications to the 
Editorial rooms, 905 Lincoln Avenue, Alameda, temporary office. 
Telephone Alameda 1131. 

Tin' labor union that tried to run San Francisco's water- 
front didn't run il. cli'l it ? 

Xo. the earth is not pear-shaped. It is round like a 

plum, and the trusts have already gathered it into their 
basket. 

Iowa is up in anus against the stand-patters for tariff 

revision. Whiskey and shoes are taxed too high to suit their 
needs. 

When Bryan and the Gold-bugs meet, as with one voice 

the concert of patriots will sing: "We were not so far apart, 
after all.'' 

There is at least one Californian who is running away 

from the Thaw-White revelations like a scared jack-rabbit, and 
it is not McCaleb ! 

The adjournment of Congress confers one blessing on 

the public, anyway. Tillman's voice will not be heard in the 
land for many days. 

All fire insurance companies are dishonest no more than 

all merchants are. Use a little common sense and discrimina- 
tion when making comparisons. 

The most important municipal undertaking is the salt 

water cisterns for use in case of fire. Let us hear from the 
authorities. Why not go to work at once? 

The London scandal involves only such men and women 

as prefer that kind of a life to home life. There is no room 
for sympathy or sentimentalism in the exposure. 

Had Truxton Beale not been on hand and right in it, 

the Thaw- White episode might not have — but of course he 
was there. Birds of a feather, don't you know. 

San Franciscans would better quit talking about their 

scenes of desolation and jump in and clear off the debris pre- 
paratory to putting up permanent structures. 

The meat lobby succeeded in having the date of inspec- 
tion placed on the cans stricken out of the bill, which means 
that you can't tell whether the stuff is of age or in its infancy. 

Now the plumbers arc striking and asking $6 a day. The 

stevedores are grumbling, and seamen are on strike. Who is it 
that is keeping us back ? Where are the patriotic labor unions ? 

There are a number of cases of rheumatism and weak- 
back contracted during the fire that a hoe or a shovel would 
cure in a jiffy, but not so long as free food is handed out to 
them. 

"Our future lies on the sea," says the Kaiser. Has 

his army gone back on him ? But don't venture too far from 
shore, young man — the Union Jack is very numerous on the 
waters of the world. 



"Tlie mam chance" is everywhere in San Francis* 

enterprise, frugality, common business sense and honesl effort. 

Mi. R>dgar, oi Minneapolis, docs not appreciate mixing 

flour to hide its identity or selling it to make it easier '* to 

handle." 

Tin- People's Party is going to indorse the Nebraskan, 

which places a greater burden on his back than, with all his 
vagaries, he deserves. 

While the relief committee members are relieving the 

relief fund in San Francisco, what an elegant chance II. II. 
Rogers is losing. 

'I heir are honesl and there are dishonest lire insur- 
ance companies. Scratch their pocket-hooks and you will know 
the one from the other. 

(inner Cleveland has nol yei expressed his opinion about 

the Bryan craze, bul he has recent!} joined the church, and 
maj not express all his thoughts in the onen. 

The police department of San Francisco have the peace 

and dignify of the city in its hands, which means a whole lot 
to those whom the military would not tolerate. 

It is conceded that vice-president Fairbanks will have 

no show for the nomination until Hoosierdom quits calling him 
"our Charlie." It sounds too familiar, don't you know. 

Mr. V. Cams Driffield explains why he resigned, in a 

long letter to Myron Wolf. There is no necessity, Mr. Driffield, 
of explaining. The public has been informed, and everything 
is to your credit. 

The lumber-carrying ships are sailing to and from 

the wharves of San Francisco, the labor unions to the contrary 
notwithstanding, and the price of lumber is steadily moving 
towards the heights. 

At a meeting of the Koyal Exchange Insurance Com- 
pany in London the stockholders were told that " many build- 
ings in San Francisco fell by earthquake long before the fire." 
Wonder why the agent lied ? 

The relief committee seems to have an idea that it has 

an owner's right in the stuff it does not distribute. The owner- 
ship rests with the people, rich and poor, poet and publican, 
refugee and house dweller. 

Twenty-five thousand dollars a year for traveling ex- 
penses ought to give President Eoosevelt a chance to visit nearly 
all of his subjects, and to kill a whole drove of mountain lions 
— if some one will hold them. 

The old maids and bachelors of Iowa are going to hold 

a convention to protest against Koosevelt's race suicide procla- 
mation. Presumably the convention will be in the "life" 
class department at the State Fair. 

One hundred thousand dollars a month — food and 

clothing extra — is a wdiole lot of money for looking after the 
refugee camps. Wonder if Boss Tweed haB not reincarnated 
and opened a grafting shop in San Francisco ? 

The Buef-Schmitz combine survived the earthquake and 

fire, as no one doubted that it would, and now it is busy spend- 
ing' $100,000 a month to look after the refugees— food and 
clothing extra. The relief fund will probably last two years, 
as it is only a little over $6,000,000. 

Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish, ambitious to outshine Harry 

Symes Lehr and his celebrated "monkey" dinner, gave a din- 
ner ,m the Fourth at which all of the guests appeared in bath- 
ing costumes. The next Newport sensation will be a dinner 
given with the guests clothed in a fig leaf and a smile. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1906 



GENTLEMEN ALL. 

Some time back in the years when a gentleman was a gentle- 
man, not because of his wealth or his lineage, but because of 
inherent qualities, the name of gentleman was an honorable 
title when applied to any man. The title was then and is still 
the highest a man may receive. 

The name of gentleman, regardless of the dictionary defini- 
tion, is still suggestive of nobility of character, a gentle man- 
ner, a bearing above that of the boor. 

Suddenly-acquired wealth and the possession of an illustrious 
name has given craven men the audacity to steal the title. 
There be some that were born to it that have degenerated, 
and who carry the title with bluster and bravado to hide the 
canker below the purple. The stolen livery of quality on the 
one hand and that which is defiled inheritance on the other, is 
worn with equal braggart pride by men of wealth. The idle 
rich are excellent examples of the frauds who caper about pink 
tea tables, and who grace the festal boards in sinful dalliance 
with dancing girls, with the mantle labeled " gentleman " about 
their shoulders. These are the monkey dinner type, the product 
of idleness and ease. 

The revelations in the Thaw-White ease have torn to shreds 
the reputations of many nun and many women, and, if we are 
to believe the statements of the daily papers, we may be sure 
that the names of many more men and women will be caught 
in the drag-net, and that many more reputations will be made 
to tumble into the mire of scandal. 

The private lives of these pseudo gentlemen are laid bare 
and naked in all the hideousness of unbridled lust and in- 
decency. In the calcium stands the principal actor, a murderer, 
self-confessed. The victim, it is said, was a degenerate, the 
son of an illustrious father, but yet a degenerate, and the press 
of the land labels him as such, because of suddenly-acquired 
knowledge as to his companionships with well-known men and 
notorious women. Stanford White is one of the class of men, 
with a markedly artistic temperament, who read in the public's 
tolerations of the smaller artistic vagaries a license to practice 
all the sins and libertinage of an Oscar Wilde. Their com- 
panions are generally wealthy men, who have long ago outlived 
the ordinary forms of vice, and who demand pruriency and 
grossest lecherousness to satisfy their passions. These men 
are unhappy in the companionship of decent men and women, 
and live a double life. Their families, as a rule, are main- 
tained to cloud the sight of the investigator, or as a haven of 
refuge to which to flee for quiet after a season of unbridled 
license with male and female concubines. 

The Examiner, organ of filth, proceeds cheerfully to the task 
of exposing this nest of degeneracy. It flaunts to the world 
the fact that one Truxtnn Beale was the dining companion of 
Stanford White, and then it piles up the evidence that White 
was one of the worst degenerates who ever cursed the great 
American metropolis by his leprous presence. Then it follows 
this two or three days later with the statement that Beale is 
the friend of the young man, who stands so near the gallows. 
Does the Examiner possess unrevealed evidence to show that 
companionship with Beale is conclusive proof of a lesser or 
greater degree of degeneracy. The Examiner forgets for the 
moment that it and its millionaire proprietor are birds of a 
feather with the delectable assortment of gentlemen of chivalry 
it is so cheerfully assisting to expose. Here is the Examiner's 
evidence : 

"While the Thaws and Thomas W. McCaleb, a Californian, 
were dining on Monday evening in the main dining room of 
the Cafe Martin, Stanford White, his son Lawrence, Truxtun 
Beale, and another man were dining on the Fifth avenue bal- 
cony of the same cafe."' 

"Noticing Evelyn-Nesbit-Thaw seated with her husband and 
his friend, according to this witness, White turned to his com- 
panion and remarked with a sneer: 'There's the little Nesbit 

,' as before stated. His supplementary comment was 

so worded as to be unprintable." 

The Examiner does not go on to record that Mr. Thaw',-, 
companion immediately arose, and in righteous indignation, that 
any one should apply such language to his friend's wife, smote 
the speaker where he stood. 

And yet the mutual friend of Mr. Thaw and Mr. Stanford 
White might have called in a friend, and later made a friendly 
call on Mr. White, and shot him in the back while he was 



hanging up the callers' hats. The Examiner is merciless, how- 
ever, and goes on piling proof on proof directly and by infer- 
ence to show that White was the companion of the worst de- 
generates in New York, and himself a leader in the set. 

At last accounts, Mr. Thaw was a few steps nearer the 
gallows and Mi'. Truxtun Beale was in the wilds of Maine, 
limiting snipe, out of easy reach of process servers who would 
make of him an unwilling witness. 

None of the facts alleged in the Thaw-White case justify 
Thaw in the taking of the law into his own hands. Neither 
is tire fact that $40,000,000 "will be spent, if need be," to free 
him tn In- taken into consideration. Evidence of the free use 
nl' money is plentiful, and the attempt that is being made to 
show the public at large that murder in the United States and 
freedom from punishment therefor is only a epiestion of money, 
at so much per head, is doomed to failure. 

A fancied grievance, jealousy, a desire to pose as a cham- 
pion of chivalry, or other cause, is made the excuse for inex- 
cusable killing. Nothing has developed in this case to show 
anything but premeditated murder. 



SALT WATER CISTERNS AND INSURANCE. 

The News Letter originated the idea of a municipal system 
nl' salt water cisterns for the business and residence districts 
of San Francisco, and, as it seems to have been favorably received 
by business men and property owners, a further discussion be- 
comes necessary in these columns. While the scheme 
is one that finds general approval, there seems to be a number 
of people who suggest reservoirs instead of cisterns; these 
reservoirs to be placed on the high hills in various parts of 
the city. This is not a practical idea, for the reason that every 
convenient hill is already the property of the Spring Valley 
Water Company, and also because land not owned by the 
Hater corporation is held at too high a valuation to allow of 
purchase for municipal use. As pressure is not necessary in 
using the water for lire purposes, t lie News Letter adheres to 
the original idea, arrived at after mature consideration, that 
the cisterns should lie numerous and placed at convenient places 
throughout the city. As land purchased for this purpose 
would foot up an immense sum of money, the suggestion is 
made that the purchase of land is not necessary. There is 

plenty of )' ii for the system on land already owned by the 

people. 

Every intersection of streels should have a large cistern, which 
would lie most convenient for pumping purposes. It has been 
argued that salt water must lie not allowed to stand long in one 
place, and this objection is disposed of hy occasionally emptying 
the contents of the cisterns into the public sewers for the pur- 
poses of flushing. Salt water is the very best for this purpose. 

The fresh supply for the cisterns can easily be furnished by 
a powerful engine situated on the water-front, or by making 
arrangements with the many pipe-line systems now bringing 
salt water into the city. 

There is a general howl from people in the burned district 
to the effect that insurance premium rates on the new and 
temporary structures has been placed at nearly 10 per cent. 
Adequate lire extinguishing facilities will certainly lower rates 
in the district, and the salt water cistern system will go far in 
reducing rates considered exorbitant by the insured. The salt 
water system for fire and street sprinkling purposes will lessen 
the strain mi an already over-taxed fresh water supply system, 
and will guarantee a constant and sanitary sewer flushing and 
street cleaning supply of water without drain on the Spring 
Valley Water Company's production. 

AN ENTERPRISING WRETCH. 

A miserable wretch at Cleveland. Ohio, built a hummock 
across a well-traveled road to injure automobilists, and suc- 
eeeded in killing an eighteen-year-old boy, the son of F. M. 
Osborn. ex-president of the Pittsburg Coal Company. It is 
reported that Dr. Osborn will bring a suit against the man 
as soon as his name is discovered on the charge of murder. 
Near Tonopah a man stretched barbed wire across a road, 
with the result that three persons were seriously injured. No 
penalty is too great to make people pay who value human life 
at so slight cost. Hanging is a mild penalty. 









DONATED FLOl 

n in tin- ■ 

■ f Uh 
tin- purpose >>f " rchabili- 
ll..iir trn.1 

r of the Miniii- 
iiiiiiiii. showing 
in *'-|ii. ■ tuneful way in which tin 

-•«'ii treated by the 

lintiil in San Prani 
Mr. Edgar ami his coinn justly indignant, ami the 

wind-up paragraph voices the sentiments "f these generoti 
pie : 

of Trust. 

he situation otherwise than simply ibis: Min- 
neapolis gave BO, I Backs of Bom t" the | pie of Sun Pran- 

The led Cross undertook to receive and distribute ii. 
Instead of .. Mr. Devine, i t s agent, turned the flour 

over i" Qeneral Greeley, who, refusing in deliver ii to the own- 

ild the property to the highest bidder at a sacrifii 
nine, I hold, and shall continue to hold, in spite of chairmen, 
generals, secretaries and even princes ami potentates, that if 
a trust is accepted, it must in' literally discharged in accordance 
with tin- v. i!i,' owner, ami. having protested vainly 

against the sale of the Sour, I place the responsibility for this 
mil palpable misuse of relief supplies where it justly be- 
longs: with the Red Cross, of which Mr. Taft is president, 
Mr. Magee secretary, and In-. Devine agent, ami which was 
recommended and endorsed by President. Roosevelt. 
" Yours respectfully, 

"WILLIAM C. EDGAR, 
"Chairman California Relief Committee of Minneapolis. 
"Minneapolis, June 36, 1906." 



COMPARISON'S 

Mr. Thomas P. Woodward, City Engineer, San Francisco, 
lias compiled the following table, embodying it in Ms report to 
the Board of Supervisors regarding the burned area in the 
city: 

Square Blocks 

District Acres Miles Entire Portion 

North of Market, 50-vara . 1088 1.70 299 13 

Western Addition 301 .47 76 5 

South of Market, 100-vara. 762 1.19 69 5 

Mission 442 .69 46 9 

Total 2593 4.05 490 32 

The total of the burned area approximates 2,593 acres, or 
4.05 square miles, or 490 blocks. This means that the burned 
area, as compared with the rest of the State of California is a 
mere fly-speck. In the Santa Clara Valley we find one field 
of 2,500 acres devoted to the culture of sweet peas. Near 
Ventura, in the southern part of the State, we find an olive 
orchard with nearly 3,000 acres in cultivation. 

Planting of new houses, rebuilding of business districts, 
erecting sky-scrapers, goes merrily on in San Francisco, and 
it will only be a short time before the great big burned area will 
have been plowed, cleansed and seeded for a full crop of build- 
ings to cover every inch of cleared ground. 



THE APPROACHING LOCAL ELECTION. 

The Board of Election Commissioners has arrived at a de- 
cision by which it will disfranchise all the tent dwellers. No 
citizen of San Francisco living in a public square will be al- 
. lowed to register. The board will allow a citizen to register 
from his old residence, but in the instructions issued by the 
Commissioners, it is pointed out that such a vote is liable to 
challenge. There is now no doubt that the vote in San Fran- 
cisco, on account of departures and because of disfranchise- 
ment by the act of the Board, will be much reduced. It is 
thought that the city will poll about one-half the usual number 
of votes. 



II i 

• 
opmenf ol 

turned lo-day. I!..tli officers of I 
Ihc daily pi 
• if tearing aside t|„- garish, tinnoled curtains thai 

hiding tl i n-i life in the New ifork Tenderloin 

cipals in this tragedy and thi 

Surprising statements were made to-day regarding the two 
Californians whose names have been brought into conn 
with the murder. The Els \ strange feature of the 

case thai has never been cleared up is the connection of Truxtun 
with events preceding the tragedy, h has been asserted 
thai Beale, who is a San Francisco society man. was al 
Thaw's table in Martin's al the dinner thai preceded the shoot- 
ing. Ii has been stated just as positively thai Beale sal with 

Stanford White and his Bon, Lawi White. Still another 

story is that Beale lefi w I 's table and wenl over to sp 

Thaw and to his California friend, McCaleb. It wa 

thai Beale might be the mysfc i son who went to 

Thaw in Marian's ana told him of (he alleged remark by While 
concerning Mrs. Thaw. Beale was an intimate friend of Thaw. 
it is said, and also a friend of Stanford White. Beale was in a 

position to give Thaw good advice as to the proper way to ah 

up a man he haled. A few years ago Beale and his friend, Tom 

Williams, wcui out to the lioi r Editor Marriott of the San 

Francisco News Letter, and Marriott was a good deal heavier 

with leaden bullets when (he shooting was over. His remark- 
able vitality saved his life." 



A CROP OF 8UIT8. 



The Julian McAllister Company has filed a suit against the 
Williamsburg City Fire Insurance Company of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
for $4,000 insurance on the buildings of the plaintiff that were 
destroyed by fire on April 18th. 

These buildings were located at 505 and 509 Kearny street, 
and it is stated that they were destroyed by fire and not by 
earthquake. H. W. Colson, the agent of the insurance company 
has declined all liability under the contract. This is only one 
of hundreds of suits that will shortly be begun against various 
companies taking advantage of the earthquake clause in the 
policies. It is well, at this time, to call attention to the fact 
that this celebrated clause is not a safe refuge for the com- 
panies. The wording is such that, in nearly all instances, it is 
a defective protection. Besides this characteristic, which seems 
to be general, there are certain decisions in existence that make 
it ineffectual as a weapon of defense against the claims of the 
insured. The earthquake clause is not worth the paper it is 
written upon. 

That delightful old busy-body, Professor Metchnikoff, 

the author of the theory that the soul exudes in the shape of 
minute organisms through the pores of the skin, is now out 
with a consoling lecture to the effect that a healthy person 
may carry many thousands of virulent bacteria in his body 
without suffering harm. 



All the difference that the advance in license fees in San 

Francisco will make to the dives is that they will have to 
adulterate their liquors a little more. But tobacco, rain-water 
and wood alcohol are not expensive. Verily, the City Hall 
ring provides amply in the end for its ward bosses. 

An Eastern journal gravely announces Bryan for Presi- 
dent and Bussell Sage for Vice-President as standard bearers 
for the "conservative " democracy. Hearst always did make 
strange bed-fellows. 



When called upon in a police court to do something 

toward supporting his wife, Eiley Grannan pinched his famous 
roll for a miserable $15. That wasn't much of a splash for a 
plunger. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 190G 



US MStonll W©& Ekws ft® IMS 



Roosevelt and the Congressional Campaign. 

The first session of the Fifty-ninth Congress is now a recol- 
lection, and members are already at home trying to explain to 
their electors why more was not accomplished for the public 
in general and their own districts in particular. But in fact, 
the Congress did accomplish an enormous amount for public 
good, though nearly all of it could have been better. The exact 
relation between the nation and corporations acting under 
national or State charters was defined for the first time in the 
history of the country. The principle is now established that 
any business enterprise in whose conduct all the people have 
interest, and whose operations extend beyond the boundary line 
of the State in which its headquarters or plant is located, is 
subject to supervision and regulation by the Federal Govern- 
ment. But nowhere in the assumption of national authority 
in the premises is there a single hint or suggestion that public 
ownership of public utilities would be either desirable or per- 
missible under our form of Government. Had Congress ac- 
complished nothing more than this, its session would go down 
in history as having done a mighty work for the general welfare 
of all the people. It established a principle that will always 
exert a powerful restraining influence over organized capital 
as well as over organizations who do not "corner " and obstruct 
the freedom of opportunity to go into the channels of affairs 
by aggregations of capital, but by the numerical strength of 
combined skill. Perhaps not many have taken the trouble to 
carefully analyze the new common carrier rate law. A thought- 
ful study of all of its inner meaning will disclose the fact that 
its fundamental and underlying principle contemplates the 
supervision of national authority of any and all combinations 
of capital or individuals that would clog the channels of indi- 
vidual opportunity by discrimination, favoritism, threats or in- 
timidation. The soul of the new law is that the strong shall 
not over-reach the weak; that organizations nor combinations 
shall trespass upon individual rights, nor show favoritism for 
or against the individual or the community in so fa ' as such 

favoritism overlaps State lines. , , 

• • • 

Republican leaders have returned from Washington to their 
districts with their coats off, so to speak, ready to enter one of 
the most important struggles in the history of the party. The 
odl-timers, who have been in the thick of Presidential and Con- 
gressional campaigns for a third of a century or more, concede 
that success in 1908 is largely contingent upon a Republican 
majority in Congress, which will convene in December, 1907, 
and wdiose members will be chosen next November, will have it 
in its power to strengthen the Presidential lines of the party it 
represents, and correspondingly weaken the opposition. If the 
Democratic party should have the majority side in the next 
Congress, it could frame and pass bills that would be popular 
with the masses, however much their operation might ultimately 
be detrimental to the public, hoping, of course, that President 
Roosevelt would oppose them even if the Senate gave them 
its approval. If he vetoed them, the masses, who are generally 
moved by enthusiasm rather than by sober and intelligent 
reasoning, would sing their tale of woe against the Republican 
party's candidate at the following Presidential election, no 
matter who he might be. If he gave such bills his approval 
the cry would go out that the party had abandoned its funda- 
mental principles, at least on the tariff, the national banks, 
reciprocal trade treaty and internal improvement questions. No 
doubt a Democratic Congress would not fail to make these 
questions an issue between itself and the President, and also 
delay or prohibit such legislation as he might want. There 
is no doubt at all that the present Congress has given the 
Democrats considerable advantage to start with in the coming 
Congressional election. While it may be true, and undoubtedly 
it is true, that every dollar appropriated by the first half of 
this Congress was needed, the fact remains that the appropria- 
tions aggregate nearly a billion dollars. Of course, this will 
be recited from the hustings everywhere as the result of prodigal 
and reckless extravagance, and the masses will gulp it all down 
as a Gospel truth. Then another club Congress has put into 
the hands of the Democrats is the allowance of $25,000 a year 
out of the public treasury to pay for the President's junketing 



trips. Although something of the sort should be provided to 
maintain the dignity of the office of President when on journeys 
among the people, not much oratorical spell-binding and rhetori- 
cal rubbish will be required lo convince a whole lot of people 
that the President is taking on too many of the airs and pomp 
and self-superiority of the German Kaiser. It will lie found to 
be a splendid theme to inflame the unthinking mind to a pitch 
of idiotic indignation. But the unthinking's vote counts for as 
much as the thoughts of wisdom and true statesmanship. In 
view of this " big stick," and the other " big stick " of nearly 
a billion dollars of the people's money absorbed by "extrava- 
gant appropriations," there is no wonder why tin- Republican 
leaders are so solicitous about the outcome of the November 
Congressional elections. For these reasons, Mr. Roosevelt is 
wise in persisting in holding fast to his declaration that be 
will not stand for the nomination in 190S. But should the next 
Congress be Republican, ami be found to be the most available, 
why, he could bow and say: "Circumstances alter cases," and 
accept, lie knows anil the leaders know that he is the strongest 
man wilb the rank and file in the party, and that if he wants 
the nomination he can have it in spite of his enemies. This, 
however, is as true as it is a mighty influence with the people 
to continue Republican supremacy in the affairs of the nation; 
the Republican party does things, and nearly all of them are 
good for tin' country. The Democratic party dors little or noth- 
ing, and what it does do is nearly always a mistake. 

* • • 

A witticism is going the rounds which is so full of truth 
that it takes on a serious aspect. It is that the stalwart Demo- 
crats voted for Palmer in 1.S96 to rid the party of Bryan, and 
they are going to vote for Bryan in 1908 to rid the party of 
Hearst. Hut Senator Bailey of Texas has read Hearst so Ear 
out of the party's camp that he will hereafter have to find 
his political following among the socialists anil anarchists or 
Uttit politics. In fact. Hearst is nowhere now recognized as 
being a Democrat, and great pains are taken by the Leaders 
to let that fact be known. He properly belongs to Debs' Social 
Democracy, and it is believed that Debs could make something 

of him if he would serve as an apprentice for a while in the 
ranks of that political mixture, but he claims to be a master- 
workman already, and would rather lie a boss without a job 

than a journeyman at full pay. 

• '• • 

The Democratic Congressional campaign committee is seeking 
high and low for positive evidence of lite insurance money be- 
ing contributed in the last Presidential campaign to the mana- 
gers of tlie Republican party — or at any other time. It is be- 
lieved that plenty of evidence will lie found, but when found, 
the committee will be hoist by its own petard, for there is 
some evidence, anyway, that Parker opened, through his cam- 
paign finance committee, negotiations with the New York Life 
and .Mutual Companies lor a "lift." but was not satisfied with 
the smallness of the " wad " offered. Edged tools are dangerous 
playthings. 



Isn't it about time for Sam Davis In appear with another 

insurance scalp, life or fire? 



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TT&© MMstt®r @tf Fcunengim AfiMrs 

• 

i. In tin- he douma'i 

that the i 
th <>f a wholesome influence 
- - frniii making mischief, 
to have the m i re and make cabinet 

appointment] to the approval of the Commons, some- 

what after the rule in this country which obligee i! 

ite for i onfinnation. The 
■I i" the plan — very natural]; so. but be would have 
yielded in due time, and much good would have accrued to all 
by the co-operation of the ministry with Parliament 
gradually the Bocialist-anarchisl combination persuaded 
the radicals and terrorists to join with them and secure control 
»f the douma, thus leaving the conservatives and constitu- 
tionalists in the minority. At the request of the Czar some 
resolution was submitted to Parliament which pro- 
vided for n manifesto addressed to all the people of Russia 
by Parliament, asking them to not only desist, Inn discourage 
by every honorable means a repetition of such bloody scenes 
us had been enacted, and to wait in patience for the promised 
land distribution and the betterment of all conditions of ex- 
istence until Parliament could formulate and put in operation 
the necessary legal machinery. But to the surprise of enlight- 
ened people everywhere, the socialistic-anarchistic following 
voted down the measure and practically urged the continuation 
nf murdering and assassinating objectionable people, and using 
the fire-brand everywhere. Tims Parliament is for the present, 
at least, in the hands of the most lawless element in Russia. 
They have gone so far in their work of destruction as to pass a 
resolution which makes its members immune from arrest or trial 
fur any crime committed before or since the convocation of the 
douma. But they neglected to make themselves immune for all 
time, and that is why they announce that they would not obey 
a proclamation from the throne dissolving Parliament. A 
revolution, therefore, is the only escape from trial and punish- 
ment tor crimes with which the majority stand charged, should 
the Czar dissolve the Commons and enforce his order by the 
free use of the military. Hence it is that the tension is greater 
and more dangerous than ever before, which almost makes a 
revolution inevitable, the more so, perhaps, because dissensions 
in the army and navy are likely to give the revolutionists ex- 
perienced officers to organize and lead them. It is well known 
that the work of accumulating arms and amunition at secluded 
spots goes on without much hinderance, especially along the 

German-Poland frontier. 

• * • 

France and America. 

European statesmen see a good deal of importance in the 
recent financial intercourse between Prance and the United 
States, and which may finally result in making it difficult for 
the powers to float bonds in Europe. French bankers have lately 
taken $50,000,000 of American railway securities, and offers 
a market for more investment bonds from this country. This 
block of $50,000,000 was supposed to be waiting for Russia's 
next bond issue. It will be remembered that Russia's last offer 
of bonds was for $700,000,000, $450,000,000 was taken in 
Paris for distribution at home and abroad, leaving $250,000,000 
to be floated next year. Financiers and statesmen see in the 
placing of $50,000,000 in America at this time a notice to Rus- 
sia that the French peasants and other small investors, as well 
as the banks themselves, have lost faith in the Czar's ability 
to promptly meet his engagements. It is known that the 
Kaiser objected to German bankers participating in the last 
Russian loan, which France took, and that London would not 
think of taking the bonds of Russia without substantial 
security. Then, again, every State of Europe, except France 
and England, is almost sure to be in the market for money 
before the end of 1907. The tremendous speed at which war- 
ships are being constructed, and the enormous amount that 
is required for new patterns of small and field arms, together 
with the cost of army reorganization, which nearly all Europe 
is crazy over, is going to throw block after block of national 



known thai ui \ in. ■•■ 

lonaand millioni 
men tirsl. Freni md, and ml. hold 

i|imrters of the investments. 

• • • 

The Emperor has finally given Germany's answer to the 
nation'- invitation to participate in the forthcoming Hague 

II. lays down just ..no condition •>( p 
nation, which is, that the question of disarmament, or evi 
reduction of existing armies, shall not be mentioned, much less 
discussed. In view of the fact that the lirst item for considera- 
tion was to have been disarmament, and the second arbitration 
of international disputes, diplomatists fail to Bee an. 
holding the congress unless Germany recedes from her present 

position. 

• • « 

.1 ustria-Hungary Again. 

No sooner bad Hungary and Austria settled the question of 
luthority of Emperor Francis of Austria over Hungary 

88 its king than the Hungarian Kossuthists. who are in the 

majority in Parliament as well as in private life, demand an- 
other concession of no less importance than the right of Hun- 
gary to establish her own tariff Bchedujles independent of 

Austria. Francis Joseph has already informed them that 
the limit of concessions was reached when he conceded certain 
Parliamentary rights, and that under no circumstances would 

he agree to separate tariff duties. Hungary has not the good 

will of Europe in this demand, and most likely the Kossuthists 

will not press the matter to the danger point. 
• • • 

King Haakon. 

The report that Norway's new king, Haakon, is miffed and 
sorry he accepted the throne because the people do not bow 
low enough before him, has, it is safe to say, no foundation 
whatever. He himself, like all of Scandinavian blood, is not 
in the habit of bowing very low before anything in human form, 
and he would have contempt for sycophancy in any one; be- 
sides, his queen was a British lassie, and she can be trusted 
to make all crooked places straight. In this connection, it may 
be observed that another British girl of the " real old stock " 
is pretty sure to be queen of the Netherlands. 



One reverend Dr. Jackson, of New York, announces 

that Rockefeller has decided to give one million dollars towards 
the .building of reformatories for boys and girls in the South- 
ern States. It is suggested that some of this money be deviated 
to build a reformatory near Cleveland, Ohio, and that the first 
inmate be Rockefeller himself. 



Wonder what the trick is. The Democrats of Rhode 

Island have nominated a Republican for Governor. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1906 



lUMM 



©Mstt 



By Joseph Nod. 



(A remarkable interview with the Russian novelist and popu- 
lar leader. He discusses Tolstoi, Father Gapon and De Witte. 
Strange behavior of Edwin Markham disgusts the Russian. 
This interview was reported exclusively for the News Letter 
by the writer. — Editor.) 

Maxim Gorky, the Russian novelist and revolutionary leader 
gives as a first impression the conviction that he was hewn out 
of a granite block by a sculptor with a blunt chisel, who grew 
tired of his job before he had quite finished it. 

A closer inspection persuades one that the original block 
was merely sandstone, and the sculptor one of nature's journey- 
men with a firm determination to get in the required number 
of lines and angles called for by the specifications. The first 
impression of the author of " Foma Gordeyeff " came while he 
stood on the wharf in the rain, after leaving the steamer Wit- 
helm Der Grosse; the second when I met him at the home of 
a former Californian, II. Gaylord Wilshire. 

At the outset of the second meeting, one saw where the excess 
of seam and corrugation on cheek, neck and brow had their 
origin. As the harsh-sounding consonants flowed in a torrent 
from the Russian's lips, every muscle of his face was in action. 
His round, blue-gray eyes, that hint of the orator, bulged as 
though freighted with a meaning his words could not convey. 
His hands, which the bontanist would classify as spatulate, 
worked nervously ; his square shoulders twitched forward fre- 
quently as though to add emphasis to his words, and his long, 
thin legs crossed and re-crossed themselves seemingly of their 
own volition. Of majest" in the brow, that indicator of a 
man's capacity, there is not a vestige in this mouthpiece of 
the disinherited. In proportion to the rest of the face, it ap- 
pears small, low and narrow, despite the evident effort to make 
the most of it by sweeping the long, straight, almost colorless 
hair back over the top of the head. His extremely high cheek 
bones give his eyes, despite their bulging characteristic when 
he talks, a sunken appearance. His nose is large and devoid 
of form. There is, in fact, no feature of his face that indicates 
the artist, if one except the fairly well-shaped sensitive mouth. 

When discussing a point or answering a question, there is 
no repose, no restraint, no philosophical calm. Every gesture 
is intense; every word emphatic. He is always personal and 
intimate, and has the habit common to all peasants of inter- 
preting principles by the immediate actions of their advocates. 
This is clearly shown by bis attitude towards Tolstoi. De Witte 
and Father Gapon. 

The last named he dismissed with scant courtesy : " He 
failed," said the bitter one. bitterly. "That robs him of re- 
spect. Like Judas, he sold himself; that robs him of honor. 
His actions condemn what he stood for!" 

Nor would he permit the laying of a verbal wreath on thp 
priest's grave, in recognition of his bravery during that memor- 
able red Sunday when be led the proletariat hosts to the palace 
gates. 

Before turning bis attention to De Witte, the novelist pulled 
a coffin-shaped box from somewhere under his peasant's blouse 
and extracted therefrom a long and thin cigarette. Between 
two puffs he limned the Russian statesman. "That man with 
the hunch-backed soul," he said, and there was a steely glitter 
in his eyes. "He is crouching back there like a tiger in 
that jungle of the aristocracy, waiting the word to spring out 
and put his teeth in the throat of Liberty. The others— the 
Czar, the bureaucracy— make mistakes; that man, never." 

"Then you think De Witte will be Russia's dictator?" 

" He will be Russia's destroyer, unless " The conclusion 

of the thought was lost among the rings of smoke through 
which he gazed with eyes that still held the hardness of hate. 

When a man is " seeing red," it is safest to let his soul work- 
its own passage back to the environs of peace, but time was 
pressing. 

" What do you think of the Douma ?" I ventured. 

Immediately he was life and energy personified. He un- 
wound his long legs and strode up ana down the room. " Thai 
thought is not worth a thought," he began, making a play on 
the word " douma " which is Russian for thought. " It is 
not worth that," and he tossed the butt of his cigarette into 



the open fire-place. " The revolution in Russia will change 
its political character, and become entirely economic. You 
do not know our peasants; you cannot grasp this. Over there 
it is a fight for the land, which means a fight for life. With 
out the land they cannot live." 

During the hour-long explanation of the Russian land system 



£ 



P. E.IBOWLES 



E. W. WILSON 



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DEPOSIT GROWTH 



Mar. 3, 


'02 


$ 387,728.70 


Sept. 15 


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1,374,983.43 


Mar. 15, 


'03 


2,232,582.94 


Sept. 15, 


" 


2,629,113.39 


Mar. 15, 


04 


3,586,912.31 


Sept. 15, 


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3,825,471.71 


Mar. 15, 


•05 


4,349,427.92 


Sept. 15, 


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Mar. 15. 


'06 


5,998,431.52 


June 18 


" 


6,650,555.88 



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that folloi Tli.- 

fmrn him \ 

halation, puckered up In* hp* in a 

A i i!i n 

while, h 

ird till tin- rings. Iik.' 
momentarily a 

loomed prominent through the mist of the raono- 
iii land i- :i recent development. 
" Whn I arinn pay 

fi>r her amours, 11 (Triaiii number <>f - 

irorfc. 

itle t" the land rested in the soul, not in the land 

real property was concluded only through the 
transfer of the tout or . on gin g In it. 

"When Alexander II changed this system by freeing the 
serfs, he overlooked the fact that it takes more than an imperial 
•'> change the mental pre a nation. Sometimes 

the peasants may question if they still belong to the 
they never doubt thai Hi- ngs hi Hum." 

Barking back to liis statement that the political revolution 

would !»• swallowed by an economic upheaval, I asked him if 

would not have the usual historical development; if the 

middle class would uol come into power, ami if the dooms 

not the beginning of Russian liberties? 

'■ Bah — that douma! Think of the douma solving our prob- 
lems! The Czar will not grant the douma what it wants, sup- 
posing i' '" have enough character to want something. What 
then?" Ami accepting the Czar's attitude as limiting the action 
of the Russian parliament, he went off at a tangent about a 
peasant communistic commonwealth that would not really be 
a commonwealth, but a series of communities where the land 
would be held in common, and everybody would give to every- 
body, and nobody go without It was a Nirvana of mediocrity 
he pictured, such a Xirvana as would have brought joy to the 
hearts of Saint Simon, Fourier and Robert Owen, with just 
enough of Karl Marx, relative to expropriation, to save it from 
hopeless imbecility. 

As he drew to a conclusion, the cleavage between Slav and 
Anglo-Saxon became apparent, and insensibly the simile of 
the sandstone block displacing the imaginary Cromwellian gran- 
ite impinged on my consciousness. 

There was only one more question, and I threw it — haphaz- 
zard — into the middle of his rhapsody on the self-sacrificing, 
statesmanlike qualities possessed of the Eussian peasant. 

" What do you think of Tolstoi?" 

Before the words were fairly uttered, he hurled at me : " I 
don't agree with him I" 

That suited me, and I led him on: 

" He is like his works — an apology for the passive. He is 
middle-class — all Eussian writers are middle-class. In their 
books the people become mere living models, from which pic- 
tures are painted that satisfy the creative instinct and esthetic 
taste of the middle-class. Theirs is the gospel of submission. 
To accept blows in the face from self-appointed vice-regents of 
the Almighty!" 

" I would have Russia no longer the home of patience, but 
rather the home of the greatest struggle of the age." 

" What do yon think of Tolstoi's dictum that unless art has 
a use-value it has no value?" I ventured. 

"Art can never be cowardly; it can never slink along in 
the by-ways; it must reflect life." 

"Then you are not a believer in art for art's sake?" 

He turned his putty-colored face on me, a look of contempt 
in his eyes. 

" Do I look like a weaver of silk on a borrowed loom ? When 
there is a place in Eussia for the disciple of art for art's sake, 
I'll turn to raising cabbages." 

The interview was over. We went into the reception room, 
where a few notables and some women were waiting for him. 
It was noticeable that his peasant blouse had a dignity not 
possessed by the Tuxedo coat of the literary hanger-on. When 
he approached Edwin Markham, the author of " The Man With 
the Hoe" stooped to kiss the Eussian's hand. 

With the look of disapproval, approximating disgust, that 
swept over the bitter one's face, I recovered somewhat from the 
slump into which his solution of his country's problem had 
thrown me. 



lSo®k I&©yikBTO 



ni contribution io the I ■ 
me winch will .i 

■ ■in the pen of one of tli 

educators and publicists of the State. 1 1 is ind I 

m the nn.lsi of « hal might aln led a deli 

so able and long-needed a 
\w.rk as, "The Government of the 1 nitcd States," bj P 
,ol the I Diversity n nia. The 

of the Committee of Seven, oi the National Educational 

ribed the general qualifii 
irv for a text-book of Civics, in order to meel tin 
of the secondary schools of the country, bul Professor Moses has 
done more than lill these requirements. Mam books have been 
in analysis of our constitutional system, and as 
man] more have described the history of our political institu- 
tions from the foundation of the first colony on the Atlantic 
coast to the last general election, bul is has been reserved for 
Professor Moses to combine an adequate treatment of both 

these phases of the subject with a really intelligent ace il of 

the government of dependencies, both continental and insular. 
The realization of what the westward movement of popula- 
tion meant to (he social and political development of the 
United States has only come about since the publication of 

sonic of the beat known text books of Civics. SO one is glad to 

sec this somewhat neglected point of view reflected in this 
book by a Western man. In this connection the Appendix, 

Eorty-two pages long, is made useful through the incorporation 
of the "Ordinance of lis]," and "The President's Instructions 
to the Board of Commissioners to the Philippine Islands." in 
addition to the stereotyped appendix consisting of only "The 
Articles of Confederation," and "The Constitution." With 
these necessary documents thus conveniently at hand, the text 
becomes a valuable hand-book for the schools and the general 
reader, while the full and well selected reference at the end 
of the chapters make it a sufficient guide for the University 
st intent of the more ambitious investigator. 

The volume before us is one of the "Twentieth Century Text 
Books," published by I). Appleton & Co., New York, 1906. 

• * * 

Mr. W. H. Mills, the sage of the Southern Pacific Company, 
has written a brochure on "Influences that Insure the Rebuild- 
ing of San Francisco." It is issued under the title of the State 
Board of Trade Bulletin No. 15. The pamphlet is worded in 
Mr. Mills' usual masterly language and the statements made, 
while not new, flow more fluently from his pen than from that 
of an ordinary writer and while "generalizations, however 
apt, are merely reassuring," they reassure with greater grace 
when worded by a graceful writer. Extra copies may be had 
free from the California Satte Board of Trade, Ferry building, 
San Francisco. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jdly 7, 190G 



Adler, the Yiddish actor, as Shylock 
is the talk of New York. His concep- 
tion of the part is novel and ensures 
crowded houses. Mr. Adler will appear 
at the West End Theatre in " The Stran- 
ger," an adaptation of " Enoch Arden.'-" 

At the close of this engagement, 
Mr. Adler will then go abroad' to 
play an engagement in London. After 
that he will appear in Paris and Berlin. 

E. H. So them and Julia Marlowe 
continue crowding the Academy with de- 
lighted audiences. Last week's perform- 
ance was " Twelfth Night," in which 
Miss Marlowe played Viola in her usual 
charming manner, but the honors went 
to Mr. Sothern as the pompous " Malvo- 
lio." Shakespeare is as popular in Four- 
teenth street as further up town. 

* * * 

" The Paris Model " is the title of the 
new Harry B. Smith-Max Hoffman musi- 
cal play now building for Anna Held. 
The " Model " of the title is attached to 
a modiste's shop, and the display of 
gowns in the production promises to out- 
Josefa Mrs. Osborn. 

In mentioning Miss Held one is re- 
minded that J. J. Slrubert upon his re- 
turn from abroad neglected to mention 
his efforts to reach above the Ziegfeldian 
head and lure her to the Lyric fold. The 
stories of Mr. Shubert's earnest endeav- 
ors preceded him, but one important item 
which came by mail from Miss Held yes- 
terday was omitted. Having swollen the 
inducements to the French comedienne 
until they resembled an attack of dropsy, 
Mr. Shubert visited a Paris jeweler and 
left Miss Held's measure for a diamond 
horse-shoe, to cost 40,000 francs. This, 
he confided to Miss Held, was to be a lit- 
tle gift from the management as a bonus 
and further evidence of good faith. Still, 
Miss Held did not over-ride her hus- 
band's decision, and so far as can be 
learned, there is a Parisian jeweler with 
a surfeit of diamond horse-shoes on his 
hands. 

* * * 

Francis Wilson spends his summers at 
his country place, the Orchard, at New 
Rochelle. This summer he has just com- 
pleted a new summer home in the moun- 
tains. 

* * * 

Minnie Victorson has been engaged by 
the Liebler Company to play the squaw 
in the " Squaw Man." 
* * * 

Hattie Williams is making a quick 
trip to Europe, as she opens in New York 
in August. 

* * * 

Mr. James O'Neill has at last succeed- 
ed in finding a play that he thinks will be 
a more popular success than his greatest 
of all, "Monte Cristo." 

* * * 

Fay Davis will spend part of the sum- 
mer in Maine, and the rest abroad. 

Edmund Bruser of the "Lion and 
Mouse" Company has made the biggest 
hit in London ever scored by any Ameri- 
can actor. 



Otis Skinner has gone to Bryn Mawr, 
Pa., where he has a country home. 

Joseph Wheeloek, Jr., having recov- 
ered from an operation, will go west. 

SALUTED HIS OWN STATUE. 

French writers do full justice to Ibsen's 
great qualities and his influence on the 
ideas of his time. M. Emile Faguet 
classes him as the most prominent figure 
in the dramatic literature of the past fifty 
years. Ibsen, he says, made paths for 
himself. He stimulated the imagination 
nnil expressed ideas which, though only 
partly true, are none the less important 
and deserving of reflection. His greatest 
achievement was to interest the public in 
what is noljlr. and touch it by clean ideas. 
His life's work lias been well dune, and 
he has earned his rest. 

M. Jules Claretie says that Ibsen made 
the French literary temperament, which 
is essentially clear, feel the attraction of 
mystery. The revolt of Hedda Gabler 
became an imported commodity for the 
use of the Parisiennes. 

Maurice Gandolphe gives an amusing 
account of the interviews he hail with 
Ibsen about ten years ago, and his futile 
attempts to make the dramatist discuss 
his own works. Ibsen had many manias 
not devoid of insincerity. He was almost 
comically fond of marks of distinction, 
and even saluted his own statue, but was 
oblivious of criticism. He remarked to 
Gandolphe that much was written, but 
little was understood about him. He re- 
garded his ideas as an inspiration indif- 
Eerent to outward contact. 



DEATH OF BABNUM'S PARTS ER. 

The death of James Anthony Bailey, 
the able partner of the great Barnuin, 
recalls the must triumphant days of big 
circus a in I menagerie combines. Barnum 
was pre-eminently a showman; be knew 
how to gauge the public taste, and bad 
a wonderful instinct that led him to the 
discovery and exploitation of novelties 
and freaks of nature. 

Unlike Barnum, Bailey was a genius of 
organization and control. In the public 
eye it was always Barnum, but the strong 
man behind the scenes, carrying out to 
the most minute detail of management 

the great showman's ideas, was J.- - 

Anthony Bailey, the living, driving force 
of the vast organization known as Bar- 
num & Bailey's Show. 

This circus was consolidated with P. T. 
Barnum's in 1881, after a desperate fight 
between the two, the firm soon after- 
wards becoming Barnum & Bailey. Af- 
ter the death of Mr. Barnum, Mr. Bailey 
became the sole owner of the Barnum i 
Bailey Show, and after the death of Adam 
Forepaugh, in 1891, he bought the latter's 
show. He several times brought the 
Barnum & Bailey Show to London, and 
had also taken it to Germany, Austria, 
Hungary. Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, 
France, and nearly ;ill the cities of Conti- 
nental Europe. 



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ated, and the pupils develop naturally and artistically, 
learning to express themselves, not merely to be copyists. 

The Fletcher Music Method has completely revolution- 
ized the old systems of teaching music to children. 

Residence 2251 Clinton Avenue 
Alameda, Cal. 



La Grande Laundry 

Of San Francisco 

is now located at 
234 I 2th St., Oakland, Cal. 



EAT 



Moraghan's Oyster House 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

Now open at 1212 Golden Gate Avenue. 

You know our oysters. Wholesale and 

retail. 
A messenger always in attendance for immediate 
delivery of Oysters in bottles, Oyster Cocktails. 
Oyster, Chicken or Squab Loaves. 
6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 



Dr. Geo. J. Bucknall 



Office and Residence 



1121 LagunaSt. 



San Francisco 



Emmons Draying and 

Safe Moving Company 

Wreckers, General Contractors 



318 Market Street 



also 



1060 Broadway 

Oakland 



BOILER MAKERS 
P.F DUHDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, corner 
uak and Fillmore streets. Iron work of every de- 
scription designed and constructed. 



The moat complete outfit in San Francisco 

WESTINGHOUSE 
Electric Manufacturing company 

Westinghouse Air and Traction Brake Co. 

.San Francisco office: 1843 Fillmore Street 

Oakland office: 1115 Broadway 

Phone Oakland 7482. W. W. Brlggs, Mgr. 

Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 

SUPPLIES DYNAMOS 

MOTORS REPAIRS 

Century Electric Construction Co. 
18 Fell St,., near Market. San Francisco 



'• 







Whenever a m in the b 

When 11 bully i- wanted to stand in the 

for his murk 
. unarmed, 
a adram nharnied, 

Ho o >k f r. 11. >r « nh other men di 

.hist lnr. i rusrun Beale. 

\Vln>n gallantry's calling and chivali 

the unthinking victim with family is housed; 

Wiih a lie "ii his lips and a bow to deceive, 

With a friend of his ilk nil chance to relieve, 

Conies the bold, errant knighl to the home in re] 

II is i'iw inly he know - 

A shut in the back, the assassin's no fear, 

For the chivalrous Truxtun stands there in the rear. 

Shoot without fear, Btab without fright, 
Be sure you don't give half a chance for a fight, 
Strike from behind, your victim's head turned, 
Give him m> shnw. lest a blow he returned. 

Fear not for the future. The law's for the i 

.IucIl'i's are cheap, purchased juries are Bure. 

■ 1 in doubt, nor endangered your weal, 
Because al your back Btands brave Truxtun Beale. 

So al] the world over, remember the tale, 

This avenger of honor responds to each wail; 

No Bayard so brave, none with him to compare, 

II'- answers the call of the wild everywhere. 

Bach poor millionaire with trouble involved 

May have a defense by this Truxtun evolved. 

So whenever a man's to be shot in the back. 

Ami the shooter escape by a hypocrite's tack, 

Safe may he be, secure he may feel, 

At the scene of the shooting is brave Truxtun Beale. 

The long-haired pool, the dreamer, the well-meaning 

educated idiot, who roams (he drawing rooms of the world's 
capitals, is the irresponsible who furnishes the romantic feature 
io the anarch's dream. There is large variety of him, and 
our own Edwin Markham is one of these. Feted and pam- 
pered by the slobbering aristocrats who affect a sympathy for 
the down-trodden, he has found time, in the surroundings of 
pink boudoirs, to write an extraordinary poem and to dedicate 
the same to Maxim Gorky. It is a rhythmical song, swinging 
along in fine style ,and as full of irresponsible suggestion as a 
bottle of high-proof whisky. The title to the poem is " Russia 
Arise!" and one of the finest stanzas reads as follows: 

" Because the gibbet and the chain 
Scatter thy blood, a sacred rain ; 
Because thou hast a soul all fire 
Under the hoof-marks and the mire: 
Because thou hast a dream burned white 
By many sorrows of the night; 
Because thy grief lias paid the price. 
Paid it in tears and paid it thrice — 
Therefore all great souls surge to thee, 
The blown white billows of one sea; 
Therefore thy spirit shall prevail, 
For in thy failure (tod shall fail!" 

Such is fame! A letter addressed to "Hall Caine, Esq., 

Isle of Man," was returned Io the writer and marked "un- 
known." Caine is a local legislator in Manxland, and while 
il might be excusable to count him unknown because of his 
repute as an author, even a Manxman should have some respect 
for his standing as a politician. 



' .in lied in labo 
it i ommodity, or th . and n ■ 

rally, it i- by reason o i the 

lined, bnt, more often, a general arbil 

- demanded, without reason, except the riu'bi of 

might. The threat of tying up an industry io ben 

plumbers or carpenters, or whal not, i- an effective weapon 

m lb.' hands of unscrupulous men. The price of lumber in 

San Francisco, becan ireity, has I n raised thirty 

ni. Now come the plumbers with a minimum demand 
ol $6 per day. The Building Trades Council 

ion by the Plumbers' Union No. 142 in the following 

■■ Realizing that plumbic n but a ne< e 

required i>\ rich and poor alike, and that it is beyon 
;e plumber to demand a minin 

of $6 a ' ! ;i\ for bis labor, il xecutive board of the Building 

Trades Council recommends to the council that if the jonrney- 

ii plumbers i n>i -i ui violating the law of the council, 

to the detriment of all the other mechanics and the public 
generally. Plumbers' Union No. 143 be expelled from ih un- 
ci!, and that the council immediately institute an organization 
which will conduct the departmenl in harmony with the otheT 
trades employed in the building industry, for the good of all 
the people." 

The Crier hopes thai Ibis incident may break the unholy 

alliance hitherto existing between the Master Plumbers' Asso- 
ciation and the journeyman plumbers for the purpose of rob- 
bing the general public, 'the Building Trades Council waxes 
facetious when it makes (be statement that "plumbing is not 
a luxury." Tn the name of God, what is it, if not a luxury? 

" Jim " Eea of San Jose demonstrated to the satisfac- 
tion of officer Prindiville that his fist has some weight. His 
first encounter in the fistic line was with Charley Shortridge, 
when the statesman went down and out to the politician. Ilea 
should be matched with any other of the ambitious heavy- 
weights for the championship of the world. Here's a chance 
for the matchless Cofflroth. 

If there is a liar's heaven, it is to be Rockefeller's ulti- 
mate haven. Here is what he says : " I have had no connection 
with Standard Oil for twelve years. I have not even been 
in the office for seven years." 



Shreve & Company 

have on sale their usual com- 
plete stock of DIAMOND and 
GOLD JEWELRY, WATCHES, 
SILVERWARE, GLASSWARE, 
ETC., AT 

Post Street and Grant Avenue, 

and 2429 Jackson Street, 

San Francisco 



Prompt and careful attention given to correspondents 



10 



SAN fraxcisco news letter. 



July 7, 1906 



Some interesting 

Figure this Out figures on the 

in Dollars. wealth of Great 

Britain have devel- 
oped recently as the result of an inde- 
pendent research into the facts by a gen- 
tleman named Money, during an inquiry 
into the officii 1 income tax now going on 
in the House of Commons. These figures 
are all the more interesting for the reason 
that nothing of the kind has ever been 
published before. The totals arrived at 
by Mr. Money are believed to be very cor- 
rect, and if anything, they are on a 
minimum basis. According to Mr. Money 
there were 750,000 people with incomes 
below £700. There were 258,000 persons 
with incomes above £700. Including 
tradesmen, who, although doing a good 
business, lived over their shops, and peo- 
ple living in private hotels, there were 
30o,0()d [people with incomes above £700. 
There were 6,500 persons with incomes 
between C5,000 and £10,000, and the 
number of persons with incomes of 
E5,000 and above was 10,000. With in- 
creases in the different grades of from 
3d. in the pound, the lowest, up to 2s. 
in the highest grade, the income would 
In — from lowest class (£5,000 to £10,- 

i ). £560,000; in the second class 

(£10, (100 to £20,000). £875,000; in the 
third class (£20,000 to £40.000), £785,- 
000; and in the highest class, £1,000,000. 
Mr. Money estimates the income of the 
people in Great Britain at £1,710,000,- 
000. The income of the tax-paving 
classes was £731,000,000. The property 
of the United Kingdom, public and pri- 
vate, lie valued at eleven and a half thou- 
sand millions of pounds sterling. Ac- 
cording to his estimates, one-third of the 
entire income of the country was enjoyed 
bv less than one-thirtieth of the popula- 
tion. 

The mining stock 

.1 mong the boards adjourned 

Minimi Brokers, over the Fourth, 

which lessens the 
volume. of business somewhat for the 
week. Both the Comstocks ami Tono- 
pahs have not been particularly active 
of late, but the markets are healthy 
enough, considering everything. The for- 
mer are under a cloud of assessments just 
now, necessitated by the reorganization 
of the companies, which, however, with 
one or two exceptions came out of the 
fire in much better shape than might 
have been expected. Ln the course of 
time, normal conditions will be restored, 
and the management will be free to pur- 
sue the plan of operations at the front 
outlined some time ago, and which was 
just about reaching a focus when the 
interruption occurred. Prices of late 
show little change. 

In the New Nevada list considerable 
stock has changed hands in some of the 
smaller-priced shares. Both Silver Peak 
and Jumping Jack are comparatively 
new to the trading public, and about as 
little known, yet they bobbed up as favor- 
ites during the week, with large transac- 
tions, although there was not enough 



change in prices to suggest an opening 
for profit taking. Still there is money 
to be made in this market. Some months 
ago, the News Letter advised its readers 
to buy and hold Mohawk. Red Top and 
St. Ives. They could have been bought 
(hen at prices ranging from 5 cents to 
15 cents. Red Top, after selling up ro 
$2.10, is now quoted at $1.25. Mohawk 
sells in the neighborhood <>( $1.60, and 
St. Ives around 50 cents. That show- a 
fair enough profit to suit any one's ideas 
outside of the old-time Pine-street porl er, 
who could not rest satisfied with anything 
moderate. It seems impossible to work 
some of (he eld stand-bys like Sand- 
storm. MacXaniara and North Star out 
of the rut. The latter is always on the 
eve of surprising its shareholders, and 
MacNamara is almost as bad. Perhaps, 
after so many months of promising, they 
may do something wonderful some day. 
Should they do so, probably the most 
surprised people in interest would be the 
management itself. The general tendency 
of the market for the week lias been weak. 
with prices lower a( (lie closing. 

The water stocks alone 
Local Shirks command any atten- 
ds/ Bonds. tion worthy of note on 

the loeal Slock and 
Bond Market. Contra Costa has firmed 

up somewhat under a better dei I. 

while Spring Valley has bad the pegs 
knocked from under it again by another 
bogy. Last week there was an assessment 
scare worked up by some ignorants who 
managed to prove to tin 1 general public 
that they kneu nothing aboul the subjeel 

they had the brazen hardihood to discuss. 
This week the Standard (Id Company is 
posed as a possible rival by some other 
humbug, who possibly dreamed a dream 
which was exploited at mi much a line. 
There is as much chance for the intro- 
duction of a rival to Spring Valley by 
John I (. Rockefeller as there is for a San 
Francisco refugee to gel his lingers on a 
dollar of the fund subscribed for his re- 
lief, if any of the c initio.-, the self-ap- 
pointed owners of the fund, happen to 
see' him before he sees them. While busi- 
ness has been anything bni active on the 
Exchange, prices, with an exception here 

and there .in the list, ha\e keen firm, Willi 

an upward tendency. 

The fad (hat the 
Miners' Enemies owner of a dredge 
Again ol Work. in Oroville was 

arrested last week 
for infringing on one of the main 
streets of the town has fanned (he Haines 
of the anti-debris agitation which were 
rapidly dying out. The apostles of this 
cull have received aid in the form of 
counsel and advice from a local moral- 
ist ol' late, extending sympathy over the 
rapid destruction of land which it is in- 
sisted should have been maintained in 
use for orange orchards. This is the 
same old ignorant cry of the valley cab- 
bage planters, which some years ago cost 
California $10,000, in 'gold per an- 
num for the eight year.- during which 

a few masterly politicians ketit the | - 

pie of the valley and the hills involved 
in a bitter quarrel until finally common 
sense prevailed. Now this enemy of the 



mining community is industriously at 
work trying to stir up strife among the 
miners and farmers, the injury to land 
wrought bv the dredges being used as an 
argument against the latter. The I'm v 
is overlooked, of course, that there is 
no better fruit grown in the State than 
that raised in the foothills of the Sierras 
on land which was washed for the gold 
contained therein in (he days of early 
mining in California, nor is any mention 
made of the fact that more millions in 
o-old are being added to the wealth ol' 
the Stale every year by the dredging 
industry than the orange growers would 
clean up in a decade. Nor do we hear 
anything about farmers receiving a thou- 
Band dollars per acre for land which they 
could not sell under ordinary circum- 
stances for more than a tenth of that 
-inn. Pacts as usual are carefully avoid- 
ed by the disturbing element, with its cus- 
tomary unfairness, bases its arguments 
upon platitudes old ami badly -hop-worn. 

A. New. Smelter It is rather surprising 

Promised. to hear that the ..Id 

Selby Smelling & Lead 

Co.. which was supposed had soil 
out to the Guggenheimes had resolved 
after months of silence 1" invade the loeal 



rjJGjQHJi^OJQJip] 




^HZtyl ■v.^f/f 



HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



FINEST 

PRODUCT OF THE STILL 

THE AMERICAN GENTLEMAN'S 

WHISKEY 




FTrJCTrJCn 



TI^E^C^I^[JT ri][rK]E^ IJTp]CTrJ[^p]Cipllf^f^rj 









II 






■. tilt' 

time nor 

• 1 in making the 

• ■f its 

•f holding its own 

with niiv rivnl works. There should bo 

room enough for nil 

the kind along 

ley, and the 

more the merrier. 

Jit young men, 
L one Murk Anthony Young 

and the other Henry 
i, have handed London a gold brick 
in the shape «( the American alining and 
! Syndicate. The magistrate be- 
fore whom they appeared gave Jonas his 
liberty on five thousand dollars bail and 
Jonas promptly disappeared, forfeiting 
the bail. Young is still in limbo. These 
two gentlemen are known in San Pran- 
where they visited t\v<> years ago. 
- is highly connected in New York 
among the better class Jewish financiers. 
".'■I! known among the 
Wall-street curb brokers. Young was 
once a bank clerk. It is said the opera- 
tions of these two men. in London, have 
netted them handsome fortunes. 

The animal statement of 
.1 Splendid the Hiberaia Savings 

Showing. and Loan Society is to 
be found in these col- 
umns, and it will repay the reader to give 
it serious consideration. It is an explicit 

document, giving the financial standing 
of the strongest of all of San Francisco's 
banks and savings societies. The state- 
ment shows a gratifying condition, as the 
assets total .^63,217^563.73. The reserve 
is $3,545,862.38. 



Statement of the Condition 



OF THE 



SCANDINAVIAN- AMERjIC AN 

SAVINGS BANK 

Chronicle Building, San Francisco, at 
the close of business June 30, 1906. 



STATEMENT, JUKE 30,1906. 



RESOURCES. 

Loans on collateral 

Loans on real estate 

Bonds - 

Furniture and FixLures - 

Cash on hand and due from banks 



Total 



Capital Stock 
Undivided profits 
Due depositors - 



LIABILITIES 



$572,731.31 
218.713.20 

- 251.087.50 

2.000.00 

- 276,385.51 

$1,321,817.52 



$ 300.000.00 1 

20,496.37 
1.001.321. 15 J 

$1,321,817.52 



LEWIS I. COWGILL, 

Vice President. 



Mechanical Rubber Goods 

New York Belting & PacKlng Co., Limited; 

A. II. Gregory, manager, 91S Broadway, Oak- 
land, Cal. Rubber Belting, Packing, Hose, 
Valves, Mould Work, Rubber Tiling, Tri-Sodium 
"Phosphate. 



t 



Overland Limited 

Read the latest book 

( lt^ in the library on the train). 
Write your best friend 

( Desks and Stationery in the car). 

Enjoy the passing scenery. 
(Unusually attractive on this route]. 

68 Hours to Chicago 



The least time en route; 
connects with the 1 8 hour 
trains to New York. 



^ 



THE STANDARD TRAIN 



THE STANDARD ROUTE 



Southern Pacific 



v 



^ 



It is Well Known 

that the proper place for a vacation 
is in Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino or 
Lake Counties, reached by the 

California Northwestern Railway 

AND THE 

North Shore Railroad 

You can stop at some mineral spring resort or private home in one of the pretty towns 5 
rusticate on a farm or camp by some stream. 

Call or write for "Vacation 1906" which will give detailed infoimation showing terms 
for board $7.00 per week and upwards. 

Ticket Offices and General Office in Ferry Building, foot of Market St., San Francisco, 
California. 



JAMES AGLER, 

General Manager. 



R. X. RYAN 

Gen. Pass, and Freight. Agt.. 



"THE POT CALLED THE KETTLE BLACK." 
BECAUSE THE HOUSEWIFE DIDN'T USE 

SAPOLIO 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 190fi 



Time to do Something. 

Isn't it about time some of those who 
held policies in the Eagle Insurance Co. 
took steps in the mailer, with a view to 
bringing this company to book? The 
Eagle Company cancelled all existing 
policies in San Francisco on June 8th 
and since then nothing has been heard 
about its affairs. It is supposed to be 
still in business in other Stales in the 
Union, and here is an excellent chance 
to exercise the "fraud order" privilege of 
the postoffice department to some good 
purpose. It would take six months to a 
year to weed out a fraudulent insurance 
company through the offices of the vari- 
ous insurance commissioners of the sev- 
eral States. The postmaster general can 
eliminate a welcher from the insurance 
field by one stroke of his pen. He can 
effectually stop the fraud in less than a 
week. Let some of the aggrieved holders 
of policies in the welching companies 
invoke this action by the Washington 
authorities. 

The Eagle Company's liabilities in San 
Francisco amounted to $673,244, its cap- 
ital is $300,000, and the surplus is 
$370,07 2. 

* * * 

An 'Equitable Settlement. 

An unexpected tribute to the Fireman's 
Fund Company comes from Mr. Charles 
C. Boynton, attorney for the "organized 
policy holders." He says that he was 
more than pleased with the attitude of the 
Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, and 
had no criticism whatever to make as to 
the manner in which the losses were ad- 
justed. What he hoped would be a start 
toward the adjustment of the losses of the 
organized policy holders turned out to be 
a complete and final adjustment for the 
full amount named on the face of the 
policies. 

There was no suggestion to him to 
adopt or agree to any discount, but he 
was informed in advance that all claims 
adjusted in full would lie paid in full. 

No question was raised concerning the 
destruction of a building by dynamite, 
although in several instances it appeared 
that the buildings had been dynamited. 
The company frankly recognized the fact 
that the dynamiting was used to check 
the conflagration and the loss was in law 
and equity a fixe loss, and one for which 
the company was liable, and in every 
case where the question of the build bag 
having been dynamited might have been 
raised the loss was adjusted in full, the 
point not even being pressed. 

This is as it should be. The Fireman's 
Fund is the great home company and it is 
a source of pride to San Franciscans to 
know the honorable course pursued. 

- .~.vms tl/ey are Rude. 

The Rhine and Moselle is one of the 
Foreign companies that is holding back 
in settlements. Sheldon Wright says that 
a suit will soon be brought to make this 
company toe the mark. He claims that 
the company's agents are rude and others 



If you owned a furniture store now, what would you do? 
Would you charge all the law would allow and make a lot 
of profit quickly— or would you be very moderate and make 
a lot of friends? Which policy, in your opinion, is the wiser? 
We've chosen to make the friends— to tie them to us with 
hoops of low prices—believing they'll appreciate itthe more now. 
Furniture, carpets, rugs, stoves, bedding, mattresses, linoleums. 



LAVENSON-SHIELY CO. 



Haight and Webster Streets 



San Francisco 



of the policy-holders say that the agents 
act as intelligently as clams and volunteer 
about as much information as the Sphinx. 
The bulwark this company hides behind 
is an earthquake clause. Mr. Wright 
says in a newspaper interview thai he 
and bis associates propose to break into 
the Rhine and Moselle treasury by way 
of the courts. 

The Insurance Situation.. 

The insurance companies have been 
divided into three kinds, the real dollar 
for dollar, the companies that will pay in 
full, if given time and the bankrupts. 
There is still another class, and that '8 
the corporation that is fully able to pay 
but does not do so because it seems profit- 
able to delay. 

There are many of these companies, 
having abundant surplus and fully able 
to settle and yet humbugging the policy- 
holders along in the hope that they will 
finally accept from live per cent to forty 
per cent less than the adjusted loss for the 
sake of securing immediate money. 

Let us examine into the course pur- 
sued by the Scottish Union and National. 
This company is selected because it has 

reduced the policy of do-nnthingism to an 
exact science, guaranteeing profitable re- 
sults. It holds its policy-holders off as 



long as possible, by every technical excuse, 
and by every subterfuge known to the 
professional adjuster. It has removed its 
headquarters to a remote section and this 

means a long journey on a trolley car, a 
transfer to a boat anil then a train and 
finally a trolley car trip. Hue means the 

loss of hour- every time the policy-holder 

has any business to transact with this 
company. Then begins the petty delays 
and inconveniences, the insolent excuses 
and attempted brow-beatings or if it is 
seen that such methods will not go with 
"this or that particular individual, the 
technical delay is interposed. In any 
event, the course is always one thai makes 
for delay, in the hope that eventually the 
insured will accept some settlement that 
will shave by live pei- cent to thirty-five 
per cent that to which he is really entitled 
by his policy mi the face of his contract. 
The big delaying companies have their 
favorites among the newspapers ami it is 

markedly evident that the Scottish Onion 
ami National shows a distinct preference 
for the Chronicle.. Every lime some pettj 

claim is setled in full, every lime policy 
dictates the payment of a large loss, the 
Chronicle is immediately informed. The 

next morning there is a blare of publicity 
and great credit is given for the action by 
the Scottish Union. The hundreds of 



SAN MATEO 



HAYWARD PARK 

60 foot lots in this exclusive park, adjoining splendid 
private grounds—! 1 100. 
HAYWARD ADDITION 

50 foot lots— a short walk from the cars, close to the 
village— $900. 
SAN MATEO PARK 

100 foot lots— toward the foot hills, fine view, good 
air-$700. 

All with street work done, sewers and water— easy terms. 
Thirty minutes by steam cars, now— less, next year. 

Baldwin CS, Howell 

1692 Fillmore street 

FRANK S. GRUMMON, San Mateo Agent 















ire not 
method 

ind yet 
Idling 






• ni.'iit 

for toe Londoi • iration 

that - in Pram 

This was . 
tphical error and with tin- 
well-informec! simply caused a smile, but 
may have believed that the 
losses of this standard comDany approxi- 
mated anything like lliis sum it is well to 

■ h impression. The capital 
(paid 11 [ • i and the cash ass 

'".' and the losses in San Fran- 
Minn, ti 
Francisco office is a< 2321 Buchanan 
> Washington. Mr. Wm. 
J. Landers is the manager for the com- 
pany and Mr. P. W. Tallant is the branch 

■.irv. 

» * * 

The American Company of Boston is 
practical Iv going out of business and )t 
-insmed iis outstanding policies. It 
: that it offers to make settlement at 
the rate of forty cents on the dollar and 
this is probably the best that is obtainable 
for the policy-holders. 

• * * 

The Dutchess Insurance Company is re- 
ported as settling on the basis of thirty- 
five to forty per cent. 

* * * 

Insurers in the State at large, or in 
other parts of the country, should note 
carefully the names of the welching com- 
panies, as published from time to time. 

The California Insurance Company has 
levied an assessment of $40 per share to 
pay its fire losses in San Francisco. It 
will be delinquent July 31st. 



ONE OF THE BRITISH COMPANIES 
The position taken by the Royal Ex- 
change Assurance at a meeting held re- 
cently in London to consider the heavy 
loss sustained by the corporation by the 
fire at San Francisco, seems to be one 
which should recommend itself to all the 
other insurance corporations involved both 
British and American. Sum up the de- 
cision of the directors was to meet all such 
cases in a fair spirit. While the corpora- 
tion, as one of the Board put it, could not 
afford to be very generous, they all wished 
to do what was right and just in the pre- 
mises to those who had incurred loss. The 
amount the Royal Assurance lost was 
£690,000, which it is hoped will be re- 
duced by salvage to from £400,000 to 
£450,000. It was stated at the meeting 
that the profit and loss balance will be 
very much more than ample to meet the 
entire loss by the fire. A dividend of 5 
per cent was declared, making a total of 
9 per cent for the year 1905. 

(Continued on Page 30.) 



ST 



A T E M I N I 

of tin 



Fireman's Fimd Insurance 
Corporation 

OAKLAND. June 28,1906. 

This new corporation was organized on May 16, 1906, with a capital slock of $1,000 - 
000, divided into 10.000 shares of $100 each, and in addition thereto a net surplus of $ I 000 
000 payable in quarterly installments of $500,000 each. Nearly $400,000 has already been 
paid in in cs«h. Succeeding quarterly payments fall due September 20 and December 20, 
1906. and March 20, 1907. 

The corporation u\is licensed to do an insurance business by the California Insurance 
Commissioner on May 19, 1906. 

IS HAS NO LIABILITIES IN THE DESTROYED DISTRICT OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO. AND IS NOT AFFECTED BY THAT CALAMITY. 

This new Corporation, even at this time, is financially stronger than most insurance 
companies operating on the Pacific Coast. 

It has assumed the outstanding, unburned liability of the old Fireman's Fund Insur- 
ance Company, for which service it has received adequate payment. This compensation, 
together with the cash paid in by the stockholders of the new Corporation brings its present 
cash assets up to nearly $3,000,000, all of which is available for meeting its liabilities under 
policies, contracts or guarantees. 

The guarantee of the new Corporation will be endorsed on all policies of the old Fire- 
man's Fund Insurance Company not involved in any loss, if the policy-holders will present 
their policies to the agents of the old Fireman's Fund. 

W. J. DUTTON, President. 




Insurance Company of North America 

PHILADELPHIA 

To Policy Holders 

The following telegram from President Charles Piatt sets forth the atti- 
tude of the old "NORTH AMERICA" in regard to its San Francisco 
policy holders: 

"All reports from San Frana'sco or elsewhere r- .senb'ng that the INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH 
AMERICA has proposed to settle its San Francisco losses on a basis of a flat reduction of 25 per cent or any other per 
cent are untrue. Not a cent less than strict honesty and square dealing demand will be offered the assured; anything 
different would be contrary to the uniform record of the company for more than a hundred years. Every loss is being 
taken up, adjusted and paid on its merits, or as equal and exact justice may dictate. No more can be asked and no less 
will be given. n any case, a deduction is called for on account of earthquake damage, which is not covered by a 

policy of fire insurance, no more than what is just and reasonable is asked or expected. Adjustments on the above 
basis are rapidly progressing." 



It 



Office for Adjustment of Losses - - 1 9 1 5 Franklin street, San Francisco 

James D. Bailey, General Agent.. 



Hotel Rowardennan 

"In the Mountains by the Sea" 

On the beautiful San Lorenzo River 
.* and among the majestic Redwoods 

Open for the Reception of Guests 






Take 8:30 a. m. and 3 p. m. train from 3rd and 
Townsend Sts., San Francisco via Santa Cruz 



^ 



Wm. G. Dodge, Lessee 



Ben Lomond, Cal. 



J 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1906 



An unusually strong programme has 
been arranged at the Orpheum in the 
Chutes grounds for the week commencing 
this Sunday afternoon, headed by that 
sterling young comedian, Claude Gilling- 
water, who has just concluded the season 
as leading man with Pritzi Scheff in 
"Mme. Modiste." Mr. Gillingwater, who 
is making his third visit to the Orpheum. 
will present his latest and brightest come- 
die'tta, "A Strenuous Suitor.'' Linden 
Beckwith, as Mrs. Snider-Johnson, for- 
merly of this city, is now known on the 
stage, will return with her original crea- 
tion, " The Singing Portrait," in which 
she has scored an artistic triumph in the 
principal Eastern cities. In an illumi- 
nated frame, Miss Beckwith, tall, grace- 
ful and prelly. will appear as a colonial 
dame, a "cowgirl," and as a Scotch lassie, 
singing songs to harmonize with each 
change of costume. Ziska and King, com- 
edy magicians, who made a great hit 
here on their last appearance, return with 
their act vastly improved. 

Colonel Edward Price, formerly of 
Belasco, Meyer & Price, of the Alcazar, 
is now manager of the Manhattan Beach 
Theatre, New York. It had been be- 
lieved for some time that Colonel Price 
would return to San Francisco, as much 
of the success of the old Alcazar was due 
to his untiring energy, and his many 
friends are still in hopes of his ultimate 
return to a theatre of his own. 
* * * 

The Chutes is doing a splendid business 
these days. It is the great rallying point 
for young and old in search of relaxation 
and recreation. The amusements are in- 
numerable, and the Zoo, with its vast 
collection of animals, is one of the best 
in the land. 



AN ENERGETIC MUNICIPALITY. 
The people of Santa Cruz are an energetic lot 
and the damage by the fire at the Pavilion is al- 
ready wiped out. In its place an immense tent 
has been erected and the people who go to the 
great beach city are sure of a warmly hospitable 
welcome. The comfort of the stranger is the 
first thought of the populace. The new board 
walk is a source of keen enjoyment. 



— Mothers.be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Sooth- 
ing syrup" for your children while teething. 



All kinds of interior repair work and furniture made to order a 
usual. UNITED CRAFTS AND ARTS. 147 Presidio Ave. 



Orph 



^, lt -— FORMERLY CHUTES 
C U-IJ.1 THEATRE 



"Week Commencing Sunday Matinee, July 8 

STARS OF DISTINCTION 

Claude Gillingwater and Company, Linden Beckwith; Zlska 
and King, Nora Bayes; Willie Zimmerman; Macart's Dogs and 
Monkeys; Majestic Trio; Orpheum Motion Pictures and last 
week of 

JULIA AND KARL HEINRICH 

Matinees every day except Monday. 

Evening Prices: 10, 25 and 50 cents. Matineea, except Sat- 
urday and Sunday, 1 and 25 cents. 

Down Town Box Office at Donlon's Drug Store, Fillmore and 
Sutler Streets. Phone, West 6000. 

CHUTES and ZOO— Open daily from 10 a.m. to mid- 
night; admission 1 0c; children, 5c 



Bekins Van and Storage 

Cut rate Shippers 

Telephone Us 



STATEMENT 

Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

OF 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

(A CORPORATION) 
AND WHERE SAID ASSETS ARE SITUATED. 
DATED JUNE 30, 1906. 



Assets 



1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which Is $35,428 
The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is as follows: They are all 
existing Contracts, owned by said corporation, and are payable to it at its 
office, which is situated at the corner of Market, McAllister and Jones streets, 
in the City and County of San Francisco, State of California, and the payment 
thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate within this State." Said 
Promissory Notes are kept and held by said Corporation at its said office, which 
is its principal place of business, and said Notes and Debts are there situated. 

2 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is.. 330, 
Tin- condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is as follows: They are all 
existing Contracts, owned by said corporation, and are payable to it at its 
office, which is situated as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is secured by 
"Northern Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds," 'San Francisco and San Joa- 
quin Vaney R. R. Company of California 5 per cent Bonds," "S. P. Railroad 
of Arizona 6 per cent Bonds." "Southern Pacific Railroad Company of California 
Series 'F and G" 6 per cent Bonds," "Park and Cliff House Railway Company 
6 per cent Bonds," "Pacific Gas Improvement Company First Mortgage 4 per 
cent Bonds," "Edison Electric Railway Company First Refunded Moi tgage 
5 per cent Bonds," Pacific Electric Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds," "The 
Imperial Japanese Government 6 per cent Bonds." "United States 3 
per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley Water Works Company First Mort- 
gage 6 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley Water Works Second Mortgage 4 per 
cent Bonds." "Forty-two Shares of the Capital stock of the Bank of Califor- 
nia," and "One hundred and thirty Shares of the Capital Stock of the Califor- 
nia street Cable Railroad Company," the market value of all said Bonds and 
Stocks being $462, 846.21. Said Notes are kept and held by said corporation 
at its office, and said Notes, Bonds and Stocks are there situated. 

3 — Bonds of the United States, the actual value. of which is 12,990, 

The condition of said bonds is as follows: They belong to the said corpor- 
ation, and are kept and held by it In its own vaults and are there situated. 
They are: "Registered 4 per cent 1907 ($7,150,000.00) and 4 per cent of 
1925 (14,520,000.00) United States Bonds," and are payable only to the order of 
said Corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which is 10,618, 

The condition of said bonds is as follows: They belong to the said corpora- 
tion, and are kept and held by it in its own vaults and are there situated. 

They are: 

"Market Street Cable Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" $1,126. 

"Market Street Railway Company First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent 

Bonds" 433, 

"Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 150 

"Powell Street Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" 158 

"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds." 89 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company 6 per cent Bonds" 24 

"Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" 6. 

"Los Angelas Railway Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" 145, 

"Northern Railway Company or California 6 per cent Bonds" 584 

"Northern Railway Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" -24 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds'* 390, 

Southern Pacific Railroad Company of California 6 per cent Bonds 655, 



"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds 
"West Shore Railroad Company of New York I per cent -Bonds" 
"Spring Valley Water Works First Mortgage 1 per cent Bonds' 
"Spring Valley Water Works Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds" 
"Spring Valley Water Woiks Third Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds,' 

"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent Bonds" 

"San Francisco Gas and Electric Company 4 1-2 per rem 
"City and County of San Francisco 3 1-2 per cent Bonds" 

"City of Vallejo 5 per cent Bonds" 

"City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent Bonds" 



ill, 

500. 

123. 

516 

1.1120, 

1,500. 

Bonds" 495. 

2.102 

62 

11 



.00 

.on 

000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 

.00 

000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
.00 

.00 

000.00 

niiH.no 
nnn.nn 

i .on 

000.00 
250.15 



5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to July .1st, 1906 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and County of San Francisco ($129,264.05) 
and in the Counties of Santa Clara ($60,190.31). Alameda ($64,712.84), and San 

Mateo ($13,701.12) in this State, the actual value of which is 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Corporation keeps its said Office, the 

actual value of which is 

The condition of said real estate is that it belongs to said Corporation, and 
part of it is productive 

7 — Cash in United States Gold Coin and Sliver Coin, belonging to said Corporation, 
and in its possession, and situated at its said Office, actual value ] 



268,174.62 
588,661.35 



.723,073.14 



Total assets $63,217,563.73 



Liabilities 



1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value of which is $59,671 701 35 
The condition of said deposits is that they are payable only out of said As- 
sets and are fully secured thereby. 
5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accured to 3,545,862.38 



Total Liabilities , 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 



.$63,217,563.73 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ss. 



By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
By ROBERT J. ToBIN, Secretary. 



JAMES R. KELLY, being duly sworn, says: That said JAMES R. KELLY is President 
of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned and 
that the foregoing statement is true. JAMES R. KELLY, President 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2nd day of July, 1906. 

GEO. T. KNOX. Notary Public, i 

In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 

COUNTY OF SAN MATEO. I ss. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, being duly sworn, says: That said ROBERT J. TOBIN is Secretary 
of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned 
and that the foregoing statement is true. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2nd day of July, 1906. 

CHARLES N. KIRKBR1DE. Notary Public. 
In and for the County of San Mateo, State of California. 



ri.vw. 




and 



For chops, steaks, 

cutlets, etc., add to 

the gravy one or 

two tablespoonsful of 

Lea & Pen-ins* 
Sauce 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

before pouring it over the 
meat. 

John Duncan's Son!, Agls., N, Y 



IS 



L@@Ik(i[p®n^ 



un- 



Since the murder of Stanford Wl 

'In' Examiner has had - pretty 

savory stuff about him; but the worst of 
all of it — the nasty, putrid part of it — 
was contributed b- that apostle of light, 



i 

■ 

■ would publii 

nonni did, ill.- |> a,sion . 

knowledge. Ii was appalling. 

is for tlii> people to read who have al- 

• looked upon Mi-. Wl 
(ruide to higher things, who have regard- 
ed wiih reverence everything she wrote, 
who have imagined thai she was '■ 
their footsteps to the greal heights 
-In' has a following. There are many 
who have never read anything - 
weigh! or consequence. To them, this 
cheap philosophy retailed by Mrs. 
Wheeler i- .., .|, in fact. 

They read her platitudes, her revamped 
«w. loin, and it all being iH'« to them, 
they have regarded ii as the wisdom >i 
an oracle. Some of them musl have 
gasped at Last Saturday's contribution. 
* * * 

Much wonder has been excited during 
the last two or three months over the 

l • showing made by the Examiner. To 

those who know what a newspaper is, anil 
who have an inkling of the expense of 
the local room on the Hearst mouthpiece, 
the impression has been held that the 
permanent presidential eandidate has be- 
come an " easy boss.'' The truth is out, 



Pears' 

The ingredients 
in many soaps, re- 
quire free alkali to 
saponify them. 

The rich, cool 
lather of Pears' does 
not result from free 
alkali, fats or rosin. 

Pears' and purity 
are synonymous. 

Matchless for the complexion. 



Bagnall C&> Boughton 

Successors to E. E. CASWELL, Formerly 28 Post Street 

Millinery Importers 



Have resumed business 

Corner of Grove and Tenth Streets, 

Mail Orders Promptly Attended To. 



Oakland, Cal. 



r 



%> 



A Full Stock of 

Chipped and Ground Glass 

At 1 8 1 8 1 -2 POST STREET 
Pacific Window Glass Co. 



s 


anta 


Cruz 




Welcomes all who desire a comfortable and entertaining 
for themselves or families. 


place 




NEVER A DULL MOMENT 





however, and while the Prince of Self- 
kandera is held guiltless in one way, his 
peculiar method of pitting one set of lu- 
men againsi the other is the cause of the 
slump in "The Anarch of the Dailies." 
With the c ing of Michelson as man- 
aging editor the paper began to fall off. 
This resulted in a number of inquiries 
and the unearthing of a conspiracy in the 
office against the new editor. Thai the 
conspiracy is an actual fact may be 
judged by the way the average story is 
handled. 

The Examiner office is a nest of seeth- 
ing conspiracies and the latest cabal to 
unseat Michelson is only history repeat- 
ing itself. Distrusting A. M. Lawrence, 
at one time managing editor of the 
Examiner, Hearst sent out one Quail. The 
Lawrence coterie had the newcomers' 
measured before he stepped on the train 
at Butte. His failing was poker and by 
poker he fell. When Dent Robert came 
out from St. Louis to take the place of 
Hearst's hated merry Andrew he (Robert) 
was put on his guard against the pirate 
crew. An elaborate plan to ensure Ro- 
bert's downfall was arranged. One man 
in the editorial council thought Robert 
too good a man to sacrifice and so words 
of counsel were whispered. Robert was 
told that it was through women lie was to 
be reached and betrayed. He was warned 
in time but he, in turn, sacrificed his in- 
formant at the first opportunity. Garrett 
did boot-black jobs for Lawrence one 
moment and quarreled fiercely the next 
but through it all these two rascals had 
a splendid respect for one another. Mr. 
Michelson is an infant in comparison with 
the Lawrences, the Roberts, Livernashes, 
and others of the pirate crew that has at 

times held allegiance to the yellow pest. 
* * * 

Newspaper shakeups have succeeded the 
terrestrial shakeups of two months ago. 
This time it is those usually inimitable 
papers, the Call and the Chronicle, that 
are experiencing the upheavals. For some 



20 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1906 



time past it has been whispered about town 
that the Call would experience a change in 
its management, John McNaught having 
private interests outside of the newspaper 
life to which he wished to devote his time, 
after a long career of brilliant journalistic 
work. McNanght has resigned, and the 
general conduct of the Call has been 
placed in the hands of Business Manager 
Hornick, of the Chronicle, and formerly 
of the St. Paul Dispatch, a man well 
known throughout the countrv as an ex- 
ceptionally able man. The editorial man- 
agement of the Call goes to Ernest S. 
Simpson, formerly city editor of the 
Chronicle, and a man whose high abilities, 
both as a writer and as an executive offi- 
cer, is recognized everywhere. 



IN THE MOUNTAINS. 

The guests at the Eowardennan hotel 
at Ben Lomond in the Santa Cruz Moun- 
tains enjoyed a splendid Fourth of July. 
This popular resort is being patronized 
by the best people of California and many 
of San Francisco's business men took 
advantage of the day to visit their families 
mi I lie glorious fourth. The hotel is sit- 
uated on the San Lorenzo river and it is 
in close proximity to the big redwoods. 
The situation is ideal as a rest spot and 
rendezvous for the devotee of rod or 
gun. 



A CREDITABLE SHOWING. 

The eighty-eighth half yearly report of 
the San Francisco Savings Union makes 
good reading for the stockholders. It 
shows total assets of $35,729,580.01, and 
in this is included its cash on hand, its 
loans on real estate, loans by pledge and 
hypothecation, bonds of railroads and in- 
dustrial corporations, etc. The flattering 
condition of affairs with this institution 
is due to a careful and painstaking direc- 
torate and conservative officials. Mr. E. 
B. Pond is president, and Lovell White 
is cashier. 



NATIONAL GUARD PROMOTIONS. 

Major Smith of the 5th Regiment, N. 
G. C, was promoted to the Colonelcy of 
the regiment last week, and headquarters 
have been removed to Oakland. Captain 
M. W. Simpson was promoted to be 
Major of the same regiment, vice Smith 
advanced to the Colonelcy. The long 
service of both these gentleman (and es- 
pecially of Major Simpson) has entitled 
them to this recognition at the hands of 
Hie regiment. 



What, we can do! ! ! 

Refmish silverware damaged by fire 

LIKE NEW 

HAMMERSMITH & FIELD 

Moldern Jewelers 

Corner Van Ness Ave. and Eddy Street 

New Shopping District 
Phone EMERGENCY 138 







FOUNDED JUNE 18, 1862 



PRESENT LOCATION 
NORTHWEST CORNER OF CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STREETS 



EIGHTY-EIGHTH HALF YEARLY REPORT 

AND 

SWORN STATEMENT 

OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS 

June 30, 1906. 



ASSETS. 

Loans on real estate secured by first lien on properties wholly within the State of 

California $19,299,811.60 

Loans secured by pledge and hypothecation of Bonds and Stocks of railroad and 

quasi-public corporations .... 1,346.387.20 
Bonds of railroad, quasi-public and industrial corporations and of the school dis- 
tricts and municipalities of the State of California 11,406.692.01 

Bank Premises 200,000.00 

Other Real Estate in the State of California 379,984.69 

Furniture and Fixtures 2,000.00 

Sundry Accounts in Adjustment 46.96S.78 

Cash (In Vault and In Bank) 3,047,735.78 

Total Assets . .. $35,729,580.01 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital— Paid up $1 ,000,000.00 

Reserved and Contingent Funds 1 ,065,883.85 

Due Depositors 33,473,392.89 

General Tax Account, Balance undisbursed 190,303.27 

Total Liabilities $35,729,580.01 



(Signed) 
(Signed) 

State of California, 
City and County of San Francisco 



io. b. pi ■xii. President 
LOVELL white, Cashier 



| ss 



E. B. Pond and Lovell White, being each separately and duly sworn each for himself, 
says: That said E. B. Pond is President, and said Lovell White is cashier or the San Fran- 
cisco Savings Union, the corporatoln above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

(Signed) E. B. POND 

I (Signed) LOVELL WHITE 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 2d day of July A. D. 1906. 

(Seal) (Signed) FRANK L. OWEN. Notary Public in and for the City and County 

of San Francisco, State 'of California. 






IS, 



if the 
l 

it the 

In nil probability the nui 

will !>•• hi side of the 

• ml will I- . The 
report n ex- 
ceilcnl i. and with continued 

-hutllcl lie il llir_ 

knee. 

» • * 

The Board of Governors ol the Aut •- 
mobile Club of California held a meet- 
in™ lit the residence of 1.. I.. Lowe lasl 
. at which the nominating committee 
quested to make an early n 
A- soon as this report is in hand, the 
annual election will be called. Tn all 
bility, the old Board of Governors 
will be perpetuated. A movement 

for an endurance run, under the aus- 

• ■f the chili. There is a general de- 
sir.' on the nari of the automobilis 

section to hold Buch a run, but cir- 
cumstances have thus far prevented sucn 
an event The Antocrank suggests thai 
the first mn of this character be held 
around the bay. Thai course is familiar 

actically .-ill the owners of cars, and 
a sufficient variety of character in 
the roads to give the cars a good test. The 
endurance runs have become very popu- 
lar in the southern part of the State, and 

there is DO reason whv they should not he- 
roine equally so in this si ction 
•* * * 



Did the Women's Club survive 
shake? Sure! 



the 



L. L. Whitman, who has already made 
two transcontinental trips, is about to 
make a third tour from San Francisco to 
Xew York. Each time Whitman has set 
a new mark. His first trip was made in 
an Olds, after which he wrote a very read- 
able little pamnhlet, entitled, " From 
Golden Gate to Hell Gate." His next trio 
was made in a Franklin runabout, in 
which the best, previous record was cut 
nearly in two. His coming trip will also 
be made in a Franklin. The details have 
not been determined upon, but it is Mr. 
Whitman's ambition to make the distance 
between this city and the Atlantic Coast 
inside of the calendar month. With his 
previous experience he feels sure that he 

will succeed. 

* * * 

The demand for standard cars is so 
great in San Francisco at the present time 
that every dealer has a long list waiting 
for delivery. One dealer told the Auto- 
crank this week that he had called upon 
the factory for all the cars it could deliver, 
and had also contracted to take all the 
ears ordered upon which the prospective 
purchasers failed to make their deposit 
within the required period. Another 



THE BEST win continue to br Ihr only automobile tirw worth co 



itammtii 



WRAPPED TREAD CONSTRUCTION 

30 Will continue to be the best product that experience, high grade rubber and fabric, and 
skilled workmen have combined to produce. 

J** Automobilists of experience haven't forgotten the demand for cheap tires that caused 
them so much trouble three years ago. They're riding QUALITY TIRES now, and 
nothing can change them. 

Ji* Only the inexperienced arc in danger of being led into error. And they can save them- 
selves much trouble by consulting experienced tire users about the tire situation before 
they specify tire equipment. 

^ IT'S QUALITY THAT COUNTS. 

J** Our fine new catalogue contains much that is interesting and will help all tire users. 
Yours for the asking. 

The Diamond Rubber Co., 

Akron, Ohio. 



dealer stated that lie had a standing offer 
in the company's agencies i" pay a bonus 
upon all the cars left in stock. 

The indications arc that (he Glidden 
tour will he even more successful this year 
than that of a year aeo. The run is from 
Buffalo to Breton Woods, and will he 

started next Thursday. The tour is over 
1100 miles, and will avoid the State of 
Massachusetts. 

While it is generally recognized that the 
Massachusetts roads are the best in the 
section, the restrictions made in the coun- 
try towns were so onerous as to amount 
to practical persecution, and it was re- 
solved last year to avoid the entire State 
until better conditions prevailed. Several 



arrests were made in Worcester County 

that seemed entirely needless, and Police 
Judge I'tlcy seel I to 'take delight ill 

imposing the largest possible tines. The 
tour was made under the direction of men 

who \\^vr mil ci I Eor their conservative driv- 
ing, and dangerous speed was discour- 
aged in even- possible war. Mr. Glidden 
is himself a very careful driver, and is ut- 
terl" oooosed to high sliced on the road. 
The very rules of the run made high speed 
a liar for contestants, and except at. the 
finish, in New York, where (here was a 
scramble on the part of a few who had 
lost all chance of winning under l lie 
regular rules of the tour, the tour was 
made at a pace which gave no ground for 
deserved criticism. The automobilists 



Pierce 



^Automobiles 



Great Arrow 



AGENCIES— 

The Geo. N. Pierce Co., wholesale 

1013 Clay Street, Oakland, Cal. 

The Mobile Carriage Co., 

762 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco. 

Bush & Shields, 

953 South Main St., Los Angeles. 

Waterman Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

Covey & CookM. C. Co., Portland, Ore. 

Broadway Auto Co., Seattle, Wash. 

To Secure Agency Write Oakland, Calif., Address. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 7, 100(3 



were all men of wealth, and money was 
expended freely in the towns visited. Tha 
money left in Worcester County in lines 
will be Ear less than that lust to the Mas- 
sachusetts towns through the silurian 
policy of the town authorities. 

E. P. Brinegar, President of the Pio- 
neer Automobile Company, and J. J. 
Davis, the Los Angeles manager for the 
corporation, lave just started on a si-. 
weeks' tour of the East, during which 
they will visit all the princvoa] factories 
and agencies, and look into the automobi: : 

situation generally. 

* * * 

Since the Autocrank called attention to 
the commercial ear situation a week ago, 
there lias been a visible increase in activ- 
ity on the part of the agencies handling 
tin's (dass of car, and their principals. One 
or two Eastern manufacturers, who have 
not heretofore been represented in this 
section, have sent out inquiries with a 
view to establishing agencies here. There 
is a constantly growing increase in the 
number of inquiries from merchants, as 
to the adaptability of self-propelled ve- 
hicles for certain classes of work, and the 
agencies already established hen' are kept 
busy with requests for demonstrations. 
The trucks already in service are in con- 
slant demand, and one enterprising owner 
is doiii'T a ver" profitable business on Sun- 
days with sight-seers, having his car fitted 
up as a 'bus for the purpose. 

In 1881, one Jules Zahonyi, a musi- 
cian of no mean merit, perambulated the 
streets nf St. Paul. Minnesota, in a self- 
propelled gasoline automobile. Tt was 
a crude affair, and traveled at the rate 
of about two miles an hour. Zahonyi 
was hooted at and called crazy, and could 
never interest moneyed men in bis idea. 
He said at the time that the matter of 

liinery for propulsion was easy of 

solution, but that the sticking point was 
the tires. He claimed that sonic tire, 
other than an iron or wooden one, would 
have to bo invented in order to ensure 
success. It is not known what, finally be- 
came of the Zahonyi patents, but the re- 
covery of them ami the publication of 
his claims would go far in clearing the 
mists of automobile history. 

* * * 

As an example of consistent running 
and staying quality, a trip made recent- 
ly in the car of Randolph Perkins, of 
Jersey City, leads those of the year so 
far. Mr. Perkins is chairman of the 

Judiciary Commitl £ the New Jersey 

Lower House. 

Mr. Perkins bought a Thomas "Flyer" 
early in the season, and engaged as his 
driver Frank Logan. A lew days ago, 
Logan and a party left Jersey City at 
8 o'clock in the morning, bound for 
Philadelphia, a distance, by the route 
taker, of 110 miles. The party arrived 
there at 11.20 o'clock, and after having 
Junch, left Philadelphia at 1 3 o'clock 
for Westfield, New Jersey, a distance of 
TO miles, reaching there al 8:40 p. in. 
A momentary stop was made at West- 
field, and then it, was decided to go to 
Trenton, .">.">'- miles away. Il was 3:58 



Model 14 



$1750 




^^S^fiJC 5 



THE CAR THAT IS RIGHT 
in Design, Material and Workmanship. 

The highest possible grade of material, handled according lo the design of skilled and experienced empneem, by expert 
mechanics in the largest and most thoroughly equipped automobile factory in the world. 

There is no part based on guess work or on what the other fellow does, and the costly experimental work \t done in the fnc 
tory and not by the purchaser. 

It is RIGHT in the beginning. RIGHT when delivered and stays RIGHT all the time. 

These are the features of primary importance but the facilities of our enormous factory enable us to give you 

The Right Car at the Right Price 

Demonstration by appointment 

Thomas B. Jeffery (Sir Company 

31 Sanchez Street, San Francisco, California 



COLUMBIA 



24-28 Horse Power 



At Readville, Mass., races last month won the ten-mile handicap 
event for stock cars, beating ten other machines of leading makes. 

"In winning this race the Columbia lived up to its great reputation of a year ago. '--Boston Herald. 

ABUNDANCE OF SPEED AND POWER 

Another car of the same model, stripped, made the fastest mile of any 
stock car, irrespective of size or power, during the Readville races. 

Middleton Motor-Car Co. ^Z£ZJ£&ZZ 



The Accessible 

PREMIER 



24 H. P. 



LIGHT, 

SPEEDY 

DURABLE 

106 inch wheel base, 4-cylin- 
der, air cooled. 

3 speeds and reverse, se- 
lective type, sliding gears, 
$2,150.00. 

Demonstration by appointment with 

E. P. SLOSSON, 

Agent- Northern California 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The Proper Rent Service 



Our cars cannot be distinguished 
from private vehicles as only the 
latest side entrance high grade 
PopeToledo touring cars are used. 

GOLDEN STATE AUTO CO. 

Walter 8. Hale, General Manager 

Relocated al 547-5' Fulton Street 

San PraneiscOj Cal. 

Phone Park 325. 









no 

If h lian three 

IIIIV OTIC 

The fai 
traveled then in :i daj is 125 miles, from 
Kiin 

T »<iriii£r the entire trip Logan, who drove, 
might as well have left li - home, 

tiled "ii to touch one 
of them the whole time. The car \\;i- 
ont of the enrage the next day, 
and every day since, and not the alight- 
ay strain on either tin 
or the tin>* has been Found. 



The I'.. K. Thomas Detroit Company, 
which \v;i» organized n short time ago 

instruct .-i 1 iirhr and medinm-po 1 
louring car, has just leased a factory at 
orner of Harper avenue and Dequin- 
dre street, bordering on the grand Trunk 
and T.ako Shore railroads. The factory 
«;>> formerly occupied by the Modern 
Match Company, and is in every way 
adapted for the manufacture of auto- 
mobiles. Fire-proof construction is onp 
of the first requisites of this kind of a 
plant, and the match factory was built 
with this as one of the principal ends in 
view. The building is equipped through- 
out with the sprinkler system, fire extin- 
mvishers, fire doors, stand pipes, hose at- 
tachments, and all of the other fire equip- 
ping devices that can be of any avail ir. 
■ ■ c of conflagration. The larger part 
of the floors are of solid plank, 2 in. by 
ii in. set on edge, making a very strong 
floor, and also insuring slow burning. 

Eletcric power will be used to run this 
machinery wherever possible. But in ad- 
dition to this, the buildings are already 
equipped with a large steam engine and 
boilers. 

Several hundred men will be engaged 
within a short time in preparing; for 190? 
output, which is expected to amount to 
five hundred ears. Already a large mim- 
bei of applications have been received 
from dealers who wish to handle this line, 
and from the present outlook the sales 
department, which is combined with that 
of the E T;. Thomas Motor Company, at 
Buffalo, will have as one of its principal 
difficulties the proper apportionment of 
cars. 

The active members of the company, 
in addition to Mr. Ti. R. Thomas, are H. 
E. Coffin, R. T). Chapin, F. 0. Bezner, 
and James J. Brady. As soon as this or- 
ganization was completed, orders were 
placed for a large amount of raw ma- 
terial, and work will be begun on the 
making of parts at once. It is expected 
that the first ear will be on the road in 
August. 



; III! 

tlllll- 
ihcr than I) 'ing held bai 

real intcn 
all pi 

should lie. for tile ai 

reached in the motor car 

* * * 

With the placing of denatured alcohol 
on the free li> rable intercs 

aroused in the possibilities of the use of 
alcohol for the propulsion oi motor vehi- 
tn many cities it is believed that 
alcohol will ultimately entirely dis] 
the H- ioline. The city of Peoria, 

III., is the leading center tor the manu- 
facture of alcohol and distilled spirits. 

Que collections for the Peoria 
district amount annually to approxi- 
mate^ $35,000,000. 

* * * 

The item, originally published in the 
News Letter, thai the president of the 
Southern Pacific Company was credited 
with giving his chauffeur $500 to quit 
smoking cigarettes has been across the 
cult incut live times to our knowledge. 
It has been rehashed and republished. 
with additions and embellishments. This 
is the latest: "E. H. Harriman has given 
his chauffeur $500 to quit smoking. This 
is an inspiration for all those who are 
the chauffeurs for millionaires to send 
ar mymously to their employers marked 
copies of the news item, and then begin 
to smoke excessively and with great os- 
tentation." 

r l he first Columbia gasoline automo- 
bile was built at the Hartford factory in 
1895, and consisted of a metamorphosed 
horse runabout fitted with a three-cylin- 
der air-cooled engine, which previously 
did duty propelling an old-fashioned tri- 
cycle. This machine has what was prob- 
ably the first planetary transmission gear 
ever used on an automobile. The power 
was conveyed by the gearing from the 
engine to one rear wheel only, the other 
one slipping. Steering was accomplished 
by lever and sector, and gear arrange- 
ment, which swung the entire front axle. 
Pneumatic tires were fitted to the wheels 
of the machine, which was purely an ex- 
perimental affair, and was considered 
quite a success, attracting no end of at- 
tention on the streets of Hartford and 
outlying districts. 






Messrs. Frank S Wolf, "The Tog- 
gery," 628 Market street, have now opened 
again at the corner of Van Ness avenue 
and Ellis streets. The arranging of the 
store is unusually unique and attractive, 
and the stock is new and up-to-date. Their 
numerous friends and the public generally 
will no doubt patronize them as gener- 
ously as ever. 



A Fair Offer 

To prove lo nifl 

Dyspepsia 

tie •• 

Glycozone 



$1.00 Bottle FREE 

one tend ins ihl - id 

K»y forwat Absolute! j 

armlr i* lndi>r«rd and ducce<nfull\ uicd 
by phy«klanv 

[ hisoffcMUnds roodon'y tcra short time. 
Write today 



64F Prince St.. Now York 



AUTO TIPS 

s.sx JOSE Hotel Vendome. Rendezvous for 
automobiles. Bathing pavilion; commodious 
garage; gasoline ■<( ;iii hours. 

i-' 1 iR g isoline, sundries and repairs at San 
Jose stop at Letcher's Automobile G 

COmeT First ami St. JameS. Tel. Main 808 

1,0s OIiIVOS— Hotel I,os Olivos. Mldwa; 

1 \ n Santa Barbara arm San Luis Obispo. 

First-class in all respects; auto parties run- 
ning between San Francisco ami Los Angeles 
all stop here. Good Shooting ami tishinp; tim- 
ing seasons. 



HEADQUARTERS— 

Automobile Clothing for Men and Women 
ROOS BROS. 
Goggles, Hoods, Robes, Etc. Fillmore and OTarrell Stree 



TRfeyRLE. COMPANYS 

InvafiHyiolHng Chairs 






XNDlUlCYCLE CHAIRS 



Gity Abstract Co., Inc. 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS 

69 City Hall Avenue 



Will resume business on or about June 5, 
1906. Bank renewals will be given imme- 
diate attention. 



-ALSO-- 



Fire Insurance Corporations desiring in- 
formation as to record title of property 
covered by insurance can be furnished 
same promptly and on special terms. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1906 



THE F. THOMAS PARISIAN 
DYEING & GLEANING WORKS 

Cleansing Dainty Garments our Specialty 

Our new monthly contract for gentlemen 
— 1 suit a week cleaned and pressed in- 
cluding small repairs 



We clean ladies' and gentlemen's auto- 
mobile su'ts to perfection and return in 
24 hours if brought to 

1158 McAllister Street 

Oakland Office — 1164 Broadway 



Cook With Gas 

To 
Cheer the Home 
Bake the Bread 
And Roast the Meats 
That Make the Man 

Fuel Gas at 90 cents. 

Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company 

13th and Clay Streets, Oakland 

Optical Goods and Scientific Instruments. 
Photographic Apparatus and Materials. 

Hirsch & Kaiser 

1757 Fillmore Street, Near Sutter Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CARNEGIE BRICK AND POTTERY COMPANY 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile, 

Fire Clay, Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, 

Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile 
Fire-Proofing, Semi-Dry Pressed Brick, 
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe, Brick and Tile 
Mantels, Flue Linings, Urns and Vases, 
Flowerpots. All kinds of Vitrified Salt- 
Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tcsla, Alameda County, Cal. 

Yards: San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, San Jose, 

Office, 10th and Division Sts., 

San Francisco 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Gold 
Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby driven that at a meeting of 
the Board of Directors, held on the 12th day 
of June. 1006, an assessment (No. 81) of ten 
(10) cents per share was levied unon the capi- 
tal stock of the corporation, payable immedi- 
ately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at the Office of the company, room 919 
Kohl Building, northeast corner California and 
Montgomery streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 

18TH DAY OF JULY, 1906, 
will he delinquent, and advertised for sale at 
public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 8th 
day of August, 1906, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the cost of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. E. DIETZ, Secretary. 

Office — Room 319 Kohl Building, northeast 
corner California and Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 



NEW ZEALAND'S LOSS. 

The newspapers of the United Stairs 

have I n so engrossed in affairs at home 

that the}' have given but scant notice to 
the death of one of the great men of 
modern times. Richard John Seddon. 

The News Letter of last week made 
mention of New Zealand's loss and since 
that time many enquiries have come to 
the editor for particulars as to when 
and where Mi'. Seddon died and when the 
burial look place. Mr. Seddon died on 
June 10th, quite suddenly, on the steam- 
er Owestry Grange, while on his way 
from Sydney, New South Wales, to New 
Zealand. An enormous number of people 
followed the remains to the grave, on the 
twenty-first of June, at Wellington. The 
taking off of Premier Seddon must be 
accounted not only a loss to New Zealand 
and the Australian colonies of the British 
Empire but to humanity. No Colonial 
statesman of any age or of any country 
has ever achieved a wider world fame 
than Seddon. 

Outside of New Zealand, Seddon was 
called a socialist. His political oppon- 
ents dubbed him a "jingo" politician. He 
was neither one nor the other. He was 
simply a patriot, endowed with an un- 
usually great executive ability and a con- 
suming desire to carry out the commands 
of an ideal commonwealth. He died of 
overwork. Under his hands experiments 
become certainties and he so fashioned 
with the tools placed in his hands, by the 
Eorce of popular will, that he made suc- 
cessful operative facts of the theoretical 
dreams of social reformers. 

He was horn in humble life in Lan- 
cashire. England, in 1845 and his early 
education was a meagre one. At the age 
of IS he emigrated to Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, and from there migrated to the 
geld fields, where he easily adapted him- 
self to the rough life of the prospector. 

In is; 0-71 he removed to the newer 
country of New Zealand. His first pub- 
lic office, in that country, was as Mayor of 
Kinmiiii. In 1879 he entered Parlia- 
ment and his parliamentary Life con- 
tinued until his death. [n 1891 he be- 
came Minister of Mines and in 1893 he 
became Prime Minister, which he contin- 
ued to be until the end of Ins life. 



The Vienna Cafe, at 1226 Post 

street, will open this Saturday evening 

with everything newly Idled up in line 
style. There are three large dining rooms 
on the first floor. Here ladies, when 
out shopping, will find it most convenient 
to stop Eor coffee or chocolate and colls. 
Mr. F. B. Galindo, the proprietor, was 
formerly of the Vienna Cafe in O'Parrell 
street. The new location will he as popu- 
lar as the old. and this is assured because 
the management is the same and must 
efficient. 

New Gampi's Restaurant 

To Open July 1, 1906 

French and Italian Dinners 

1569 Ellis St., Near Fillmore 



"The Busy Man's Train." 

Appropriate in Its Name, 
Appropriate in Its Route, 
Appropriate in Its Character, 

"THE 20TH CENTURY LIMITED." 

This is THE century of all the ages. 

The New York Central-Lake Shore 18 hour train be- 
tween Chicago and New York (the two great commercial 
centers of America) is THE train of the century, and in ap" 
propriatcly named 

"The 20th Century Limited" 



A beautiful etching of this train, printed on plate paper 
24x32 inches, ready for framing will be sent free to any 
address on receipt of SO cents by George H. Daniels, Man- 
ager General Advertising Department, Room 19-A, Grand 
Central Station. New York. 

C. F. DALY, Passenger Traffic Manager, New York. 



C. K. Marshall N S C 

House Renting and Real Estate Agency 
Careful attention given to the care of non- 
resident property. Resident Agent, Am- 
erican Central Insurance Company, 1070 
Broadway, Oakland, Cal. Telephone 
Oakland 3523; Residence, 1903 Telegraph 
Avenue. 

The Waldorf 

Hair Store Branch 

346] Sacramento Street. 

SWITCHES, WIGS AND HAIR ORNA- 
MENTS. 
Phone West 5606. 

MANZANITA HALL, Palo Alto, Cal. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Every Incentive to work and right living. Ideal 

dormitory system. One teacher to every five 

boys, Modern languages under foreign teachers. 

A new cinder track for th* coming year. Pre- 

l-ans v .-siu-i-killy I'm- Stanford or Yale him', 

i ' Eastern institutions. Catalogue on re- 
q in st. l ith year. 

J. LEROY DIXON, Principal. 

Remington Typewriters 



Desks 



Chairs 



Supplies 



REMINGTON TYPEWRITER COMPANY 

—Main Office— 

1015 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



EUROPE 



FIFTY TOURS 



Tours de Luxe and Vacation, covering all Europe. Varied 
routes; choice of steamship lines. Including all traveling ex- 
penses$l75to $1185. Leisurely traveling. 125 offices 
abroad. Established 1841 

Independent Travel Tickets Everywhere. 

Trios. Gook & Son 

Now located at 

410 Fourteenth Street, Oakland 

And Ferry Building, San Francisco 



Smiths Gash Store 



Mutual and co-operative. Now No. 16 Steu 
.in Street, San Francisco, just around the coi 

ner from the old location, First store iltj 

front to resume Mail Orders exclusively. 






1900 









R®s® Jar 



■r thr 
mnn 
\\l ilk of tl- 

•i the gladncM of hope* »-bom- 

Whili' \rt ihr li|M <>( tin in tn-inMr — 
iliiinh. 

I believe in the «>i. freah sm.-ll ..f the 

Caught an. I kissed by the conquering 
sun. 
I believe in the mreeht thai hide in the 
lows 
liv grmy Btone walls, where still 
brooks run. 

I believe in the long, straight beams thai 

nuiver. 
Falling down through the greal white 

day. 
While under the face of the 'glittering 

river 

Currents are moving, and eddies play. 

J believe in the rising scent of the flowers 
Filling the cup of the afternoon; 

I believe in the height of the cloudy 
towers 

Built in the west, to fall too soon. 

I believe in the music of hidden thrashes 
Onlv heard in the tangle of trees? — 

1 believe in the lullaby wind as it hushes 
Green little leaves, and the drone of 
bees. 

I believe in the good, great world, and I 
love it, 
T love and believe in Man, and the 
call 
Of the sou] that is in it, and yet above it. 
I believe in the God who made it all. 
— Winfield Scott Moody in Harper's 
Magazine. 



GYP8YING. 

Your spirit makes a wanderer of mine! 
I cannot choose but leave my hearth and 



I care not where nor how — 

If but on hill or sky you shine, 

At pleasure of the gypsy wind 

Like to the whirling leaves I blow ! 

I cannot choose but catch your hand and 



The tenderness of yesterday from me 

Is gone — the poppy-drugs of passion go, 

And duties that were dear; 

I feel a tidal ecstasy, 

The savage in me calls — I hear 

My mate where'er deep waters flow — 

I cannot choose but listen till I go. 

In green gold glamour of the early spring 
The daffodills are dancing — I must go ! 
In madrigals of flight 
The sea-gull in me now takes wing, 
The morning madness blurs my sight, 
And when your pagan pipe you blow — ■ 
I lock my life a while, escape and go ! 
— Martha 0. Dickinson Bianchi, in Har- 
per's Monthly. 



We Recommend 

GEORGE MAYER.LE 

German Expert Optician, now at 1115 GOLDEN GATK AVENUE. Hi* Optical 
Skill, knowledge and many yean of practical experience arc powerful factors to hi* great 
success. Mayerle's Eye Water 50 cts., by mail 65 cts. Mayerle's Antiseptic Wipers to be 
used when glasses Mur. tire or strain the eyes. I for 25 cents. Eyes examined free. 



t 



85 CENT GAS 



,N 



The Gas Company 



Begs to announce to its consumers 

and the public at large that the 
general rate for GAS commencing 
July 1st, will be 



85 cts. per Thousand Cubic Feet 

Offices for the transaction of consumers' busi- 
ness and the sale of gas and electric appliances. 



600 Haight Street 

Cor. Fillmore 



421 Presidio Ave. 

Near Calilomia 



1260 9th Street 

Near H 



925 Franklin Street 

Cor. EUi. 



"AT YOUR SERVICE" 



% 



The San Francisco Gas & Electric Co. 



Santa Fe 

% w 



Yosemite 
Valley 






via 



L 



The Santa Fe and The New Railway 

The most comfortable way. Only $28.50 for 
the round-trip. Reduced rates at camps and 
hotels. Write for Pamphlet, 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices 

Ferry Building, San Francisco 
1112 Broadway, Oakland 
130 J Street, Sacramento 
23 South First Street, San Jose 
1031 J Street, Fresno 



-J 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1906 



US 



Jt is time that Oakland e rged Erom 

the country village condition and became 
a city. She has 100,000 people, and her 
suburbs bring what might be counted as 
her actual population up to over 200,000. 
Yet she is not a city; and she never will 
be so long as her streets maintain their 
shiftless appearance. It is not only that 
they are dirty — and unusually dirty — but 
the buildings that line them are neg- 
lected and in. painted, and a general air 
of unthrift prevails. It is different when 
one goes into the outlying residence dis- 
tricts. There beautiful homes are found, 
facing well-kept streets. They are mod- 
ern homes, architecturally pleasing, com- 
fortable and inviting. 

Why does not the business section look 
as well? There is only one answer — the 
business men are unprogressive and lack 
pride. They are willing that their 
stores shall lack paint, that clouds of dust 
should fly through the streets. The city 
has a Chamber of Commerce and other 
such bodies. They should put in a little 
over-time work and give their city a 
cleaning. 

* * * 

It is said that in a little ever a year 
from now what is known as (he "Cohen 
tract," in Alameda, will he thrown open 
and sold off in lots. It will he a great 
buy. Even that part of Alameda that lies 
along the bay shore is not so beautiful as 
this tract at the east end. There are many 
acres of it, and it is covered with magni- 
lieeni spreading oaks. A eucalyptus-lined 
avenue flanks the tract, and altogether it 
is ideal in every way. The land de- 
scended to the family from the Southern 
Pacific lawyer, Alfred A. Cohen, who grew 
wealthy here in early days, li is on ac- 
count of some legal restriction that the 
land cannot be sold until some time next 
year. 

* * * 

I am after information. Can somebody 

tell me the uses of the tidal canal ? Maybe 
you are even more ignorant than I. and 
don't know what the tidal canal is. Well, 
it is the strip of water that separates 
Alameda from tin- mainland, and makes 
the town an island. It is an extension 
of (he Oakland estuarv and connects San 
l.eandro hay with that part of San Fran- 
cisco bay adjacent to Oakland. I can re- 
member that in the dim and distant past 
there was a mighty hullabaloo over build- 
ing a tidal canal. Il was a mallei' of ur- 
gent necessity that ships should he able 
to pass from San Leandro bay to San 
Francisco hay. Congress appropriated 
money, ami the ditch was dug. To all ap- 
pearances, it is completed, hut no one has 
ever seen a ship pass through it. Small 
boys bathe in its waters and patient fisher- 
men stand on the draw-bridges that span 
it. their hopes kept up by legends of a 
five-pound hass that some mythical fisher- 
man dragged fr its depths. But ships 

— well, maybe a ship will pass through i 
some day and scare to death the fish, un- 
accustomed lo such strange sigMs. 

Traffic between Oakland anil Alameda 
is again delayed by the laying of new 
broad gauge tracks along Water street, 



Oakland. It becomes necessary for the 

passenger lo walk one block in order lo 
make connection. The Alameda cars 
now stop at the foot of Franklin street. 

Speaking of street cars makes me think 
of that wonderful semi-occasional line the 
streel car company operates on San Jose 
and San Antonio avenues in Alameda. 
It operates every twenty minutes or there- 
about, and the cars used on the line are 
of the designs adopted about the time of 

William the Conqueror as house-boats, 

and later on adapted to electric land pro- 
pulsion by One 'if the earlier inventors. 
This is the line of a thousand wonders. 
The passengers wonder at one another. ,i 

thousand times a day, why they patron- 
ize the road. There are plenty of these 
old-fashioned ears, and more might be 

put on to advantage, 'the line is well 

patronized, since people have snipped 
riding on the railroads, locally. With 
the increased patronage a live minute 
service would be warranted, and, instead. 
the company gives a twenty-minute ser- 
vieo and the pick of the worst cars in the 

barn. 

* * * 

Fruitvale is again terrorized by the 
small boy thug. Numerous robberies of 
chicken roosts give evidence of his ac- 
tivity. Why not make a round-up of all 
I he criminally inclined and send them 
over in a body to join Blaker and the 
other " jimcrows?" 



SAN FRANCISCO'S 

M( i vim; pictures. 

Mr. .lames O'Neill tells a funny inci- 
dent of his seeing the Fire Pictures of 
San Francisco. The lecturer, who was 
describing these pictures, announced: 

"Ladies and gentlemen, the next pic- 
lure represents the ruin and disaster pre- 
vailing at Van NeSS avenue ami I'lup- 
Ihieth slreet I" Lo, behold ! the next pie- 
lure was a picture of San Francisco go- 
ing to the races. \ot noticing it. (he lec- 
turer proceeded: "The populace of the 
city was always, as you know, a light- 
hearted one; it frequently occupied itself 
with spoils ami gaiety of all kinds, as you 
will see i.i the next picture." 

Tin' next picture represented a ceme- 
tery. 



.1 GREAT REST SPOT. 
The soft, balmy air just tempered to 
the proper temperature by the sea breeze, 

the cool, balmy nights, the reposeful days, 
ideal hours of idleness, recuperative min- 
utes spent in pleasant surroundings, all 
these come lo the tired business man at 
the Hotel Rafael. Here are the sunny 
days and cool nights, health builders for 
rosy-cheeked wife ami children. Comfort- 
able quarters and unexcelled cuisine. 



EARTHQUAKE IN WALES. 

Thai singular country. Wales, has had 
an earthquake this week that shook off 
the chimneys and scared the Welshmen 
into hysterics. It is said the exclama- 
tions by the fleeing citizens, in the native 

tongue, were fearful to hear. Imagine 
a general gab-fesi in the Welsh language, 
and you have a realization of confusion 
worse confounded. 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLE 

Bear the script name of Sit 

Hartshorn on label. 
Wood Rollers Tin Ro 




PRESS CLIPPINGS 

Get the Habit 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marveJ at the results. The "Argus" has 
many eyes, you only Iwo, so lei us do the work for you. Send 
five dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spengler, Director 

352 Third Ave. - - - New York City 



Dr. H. J. Stewart 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
Special course for singers desiring church ap- 
pointments. 



STUDIO 1925 OCTAVIA ST., 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom 

Tailor 

2415 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Formerly of the Mutual Savings Bank Building. 



Rock Island 
Frisco Lines 



Passenger and Freight Offices 
OAKLAND— 410 Fourteenth Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO— Ferry Station 



F. W. THOMPSON, 

General' Western Agent 



THE CALIFORNIA DOOR COMPANY 



DOORS— WINDOWS 



16th Street Station, Oakland 
Real Estate Company 

John Partridge, President 
759 Fillmore Street San Francisco 









IFe Tallac 



|T». 



Lake T«ho*. Col 

mm —I Uk~ u>J II n I «di.<. » I 



Headquarter* for Rod Fishermen 

Sm Fimkmcmm u* nnwn tMr mnKtl lo wiilt far 

M LAWRENCE &. CO.. Tallac. 



LAKE COUNTY 

Trir WM. SKIERS- 

SPRING STAGES. 

- 

bin Springs, n.n<l return. $7. To A 

and return, 

•half hour for 
otel. Fifty pounds 
■'.v.-.l villi .■■;!■ h ti.'kf't. Ti.-k 

- 

Samuel M. Shortridge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1101 O'Farrell Street, corner Franklin Street 
San Francisco, 

Hiram W. Johnson 

Attorney-at-Law 

Has removed his office to 1905 
Webster Street, corner Pine, San 
Francisco. 

Paper of Every Description 

A. ZELLERBAGH & SONS 

405 Jackson St., San Francisco. 

514 Eleventh St. Oakland 113 N. Los Angeles St. L. A. 
114 K St. Sacramento 54 First St. Portland, Or. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

San Francisco 
PAPER 



Temporary Office: 



419 11TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CAL. 



FIRE-PROOF 

BURLAP 

For Tacking on Walls 

Wall Paper 

UHL BROS., 71 7 Market St. 

Doing Business at the Old Stand 



II 

iklyn. 

ml ll.nr\ J. 
. tin' well known and Moved 
of the Second I' n Church. Now 

tin' elder Van 1 1 r and 

Mr. i libson's son, ,■•. are to 

be married. 

To write again the name of \V. Hnmil- 
ton Gibson . and to know 

thai it refers to a living man, stranger 
still. W. Hamilton Gibson died in bis 
prime, a naturalist, a great writer and 
nn incomparable artist in bis particular 
line. 

Young Gibson is of t906 Harvard 
class, and VI iss Brooke Van Dyke is an 
and fiction writer. 



.1 CARTOONIST HORSEMAN. 

Homer Davenport is growing apace. 
Tin' Sultan lias issued an irade allowing 
him in export to the United States a num- 
ber of pure Alabian mares and stallions. 

Th" ancieni Arabian sage ami savant, 
Ben-el-Abbas, was the author of a say- 
ing that has boon handed down from gen- 
eration to generation, ami which is of 
interest to all lovers of the horse: 

" Love thy horses — take care of them — 
spare thyself no trouble; by them comes 
honor, ami by them is obtained beauty. 
If horses arc abandoned by others, I take 
them into my family; I share with them 
and my children the bread ; my wives 
cover them with their veils and wrap 
themselves in their housings; I daily take 
them to the field of adventure ; and, car- 
ried away by their impetuous course, I 
can light with the most valiant." 



THE NATIONAL BANK 

OF TEE PACIFIC. 

The first of the big banks to re-locate 
in its old quarters in a permanent way was 
the National Bank of the Pacific in the 
Call building. By the installing of a 
mezzanine floor the quarters have been en- 
larged and made comfortable. The new 
partitions and floors are of fire proof 
material and permanent in construction. 
In after years this will be pointed out as 
one of the banks which accomplished won- 
ders under the most trying circumstances. 



A FINE RECORD. 

Uncle Sam's young wards in the Phil- 
ippines began their school term last Mon- 
day, just when their far away American 
cousins are preparing for the summer 
vacation. It is estimated that 500,000 
young Filipinos will be in attendance at 
Hie schools during the term . 



Giving I In' Devil His Due. 

Botts — Well, as they say, every man 
foi' bimself and the devil take the hind- 
most. Purdy — But generally when every 
man is for himself the devil takes the 
whole bunch. — A rnericm Spectator. 



White Hot Sulphur 
Springs 



Napa county. 2 miles from St !!• 



I fader management of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Sandfbrd. 



Rates, $io Up. 



Del Monte Offers 

During the reconstruction of San Francisco, 
Hotel Del Monte ofters a welcome shelter 
to those desiring a homelike place 
for rest and recreation. The park- 
like grounds, the golf links, the flowers, the 
many walks and drives were never more at- 
tractive than at present. The entire hotel has 
recently been renovated and improved; with 
steam heat, electric lights, hot and cold water, 
telephone in every room. Why not make this 
attractive resort near San Francisco your per- 
manent home? Special terms for families. Ad- 
dress Geo. P. Snell, Manager, Del Monte, Cal. 

A Permanent. Home. 

Mrs. Mary Page Sheerin 

AFTERNOON TEAS and BANQUETS 

"The Colonial" 

Strictly First-Class 
Phone Main 661. LOS GATOS, CAL. 

Klamath Hot Springs 

Klamath Hot Springs is one of the choice places 
in the State for rest, pleasure and comfort. Fish- 
ing is first-class. Rates $2 and $2.50 per day; ap- 
ply for information at the Peck- Judah Co., 414 
Fourteenth St., Oakland; or Edson Bros., Bes- 
wick, Gal. 

Hillside Villa 

Novafo, Marin County. 

Good Room and Board One Dollar Per Day. 
Fishing and bathing. Driving, Horse-back rid- 
ing. Six trains daily. Fare 70 cents. Monthly 
tickets, 25 cents Round Trip. Address MRS. 
FARISH, Novato, Marin county. 

Agua Caliente Springs 

&mumta (Somttu, (Ualtfarttia. 
Not injured. Better than ever. Rates the same. 



Address 



. BUrlmr&H, 



Agua l£ alli'iit i\ (Cat. 



CKACGC 

^HOT SPRINGS, SONOMA COUNTY* 1 ' 

Only four and a half hours from San Francisco. As to the desirabil- 
ity of place 1 refer to any guest of the past 1 1 years. Information &{ 
Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St., or of J. F. MULGREW, 
Skaggs, Cal. 



28 



H» 



To those who moved in the great world 
of the nineteenth century, there is no fig- 
ure that stands out with greater clearness, 
with stronger outline, and with more won- 
derful wealth of color than the figure of 
Sir Richard Burton. Great statesmen, 
Imperial cardinals, Royalties, diploma- 
tists and poets — all the glittering and be- 
ribboned crowd thronging London recep- 
tions — fade into a background which 
only serves to intensify the memory of 
this vigorous and romantic personage. 
you could not enter a room where Burton 
was present without finding your eyes 
caught by the spell of him. He was a 
lion of the jungle at such times in the 
midst of menagerie lions, obedient to a 
whip. 

You must see him in the mind's eye. 
A tall man, of upright stature and broad 
shoulders, with hair of raven black, a skin 
like old ivory, and deep, melancholy, cav- 
ernous black eyes that glitter with light. 
Across one cheek is a scar where an Arab 
sabre once slashed at the defiant head. 
The chin is prominent, thrust forward 
with a doggedness that is almost forbid- 
ding — " the eye of an angel, the jaw of 
a devil," as one of his friends has it. The 
cheek bones are high. The brows come 
down low over the eyes, and are massive 
and heavy and weighted with care. You 
see in him. when the face is in repose, a 
man accustomed to lonely journeys over 
the waste places of the earth. You see in 
him, when the face lights up and the eyes 
shine with animation, a man who is at 
home in the society of every city under 
heaven, and one who has sounded to its 
depth almost every passion and almost 
every experience which can fall to the lot 
of a man. 

This was the man who would disguise 
himself as an Arab and penetrate into the 
most secret places of Arabia as one of the 
Elect: a man who spoke with idiomatic 
perfection nearlv twenty languages: a 
man who had at his finger-tips all the 
religions and vices, all the superstitions 
and customs of practically every people 
under the sun; a man, in a word, more 
nearly a citizen of the world than any 
other man that has ever lived. 

Such, in brief outline, was the wonder- 
ful man wdiose love story it is now our 
province to relate. He was at the age 
of thirty, with his spurs yet to win, when 
he first encountered Isabel Arundel], He 
was back from India, where be had seen 
a little fighting and had learned the 
Koran by heart, and was staying at Bou- 
logne when occurred that momentous first 
encounter. One day, as he strolled upon 
the ramparts of the town, he came sudden- 
ly upon a bevy of beautiful English girls, 
and had his eyes instantly arrested by the 
most striking member of the party. This 
was a tall and graceful girl, ' 'with yards 
of golden hair," eyes of the most tender 
blue, and a complexion which seemed to 
a man fresh from India angelic in its 
utter fairness and its tender softness. Be- 
witched by this girl, the young officer 
walked to and fro till he had attracted 
her attention (very like a swain at 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

IRidnnipcal Eknrfosm 



Brighton or Margate!), and, this done, he 
proceeded in the most romantic manner 
imaginable to approach the object of bis 
worship. With a broken chip of chalk he 
wrote on the rock : " May I speak to you?" 
and. leaving the chalk where the beautiful 
girl had seen him write, he strolled away, 
and strove to look as unconcerned as a 
professional guide. 

Isabel Arunilell — who. as soon as she 
had seen Burton, exclaimed under her 
breath: "That is the man!" — managed 
to leave her party and to write the ans- 
wer to his question. When he came 
strolling idly back, smoking a cigar and 
swinging a leisurely cane, he found writ- 
ten on the rock: " No; mother will be an- 
gry." 

This was enough to lire the enthusiasm 
of any man, and soon Burton contrived to 
get himself introduced to the tantalizing 
young lady. So far as we may judge, she 
meant to him very little more than the 
hundred and one women who arc always 
ready to like a good-looking young man. 

lie wanted to amuse himself by a harm- 
less flirtation before be went back lo the 
East, and here was the means to his hand. 
But to her the matter was more than seri- 
ous — it was life itself. In girlh 1, this 

superstitious young "Creature bail pictured 
to herself tin' ideal man. and lo! here was 
the very figure of Iter dreams. If be was 

philandering, she was hungering — nay, 

praying, night after night, with the 
crucifix in her hands — that this young god 
should profess his love for her. But noth- 
ing happened. lie sent her some verses 
and she danced with him — the sash worn 
on that occasion being ever alter consid- 
ered as a tiling sacrosanct; but beyond 
hintings and compliments and sightings 
anil langiiisbin.es — lite ordinary accom- 
paniments of a seaside acquaintance- 
there was nothing. 

It was four years afterwards. when 
Burton's name bad become world-wide by 
bis marvelous journey to Mecca, that 
these two mortals met in the Botanical 
Gardens. "You won't. I hope," said 
Burton, "chalk up that 'MotheT will be 
angry' now?" "Perhaps not," smiled 
Miss Arunilell; "but she will be, all the 
same." 

Every day for a fortnight, " quite by 
accident," they met in the gardens, and 

;ii lasl Burton declared that he loved her, 

and so lighted in Tsabelle ArundcH's heart 
a fire of devotion which burned with 
inteiisesi EervoT io the day of her death. 
Lady Burton's name has been stormed and 
assailed with every manner of bitterness 

ami even opprobrium, but none has ever 

1 n found to dispute the indisputable 

fact that she adored and reverenced Bur- 
ton with such a passionate love as has 
become in modern days almost a sole- 
cism. 

The Arunilells were an old Roman 
Catholic family, and were closely con- 
neeteil with the peerage. Burton was 
poor and with no great status in society; 
as for religion, so far as people knew, he 
was a Moslem. Mrs. Avundell. who de- 



Jult 7, 190G 

tested him'from the first, would not hear 
of the engagement, and sternly forbade 
her daughter to have anything more to 
do with him. But Isabel, placing round 
her lover's neck a steel chain with a medal 
of the Virgin Mary (which he wore very 
comfortably to the day of his death in 
company with a star sapphire and several 
Asiatic amulets) bade him be of good 
cheer and remain faithful to her, as she 
would lie faithful to him to the day of 
her death. 

< >nce more Burton went away, and once 
more covered himself with glory as an ex- 
plorer. It was live years this time before 
the lovers met again, and Burton was 
then "more like a mummy than a man, 
with cavernous face . . eyes protruding, 
and his lips drawn away from his teeth — 
the legacy of twenty-one attacks of fever." 
We have an account of that meeting in 
Isaliel Arundell's own words: "On May 
22, 1860, I chanced to call upon a friend. 
I was told she had gone out, but would 
be in to tea, and was asked to wait. In 
a few minutes another ring came to the 
door, and another visitor was also asked 
to wait. A voice that thrilled me through 
and through came up the stairs, saying: 
'I want Miss ArundcH's address.' The 
door opened, I turned round, and judge 
of my feelings when I beheld Richard! 
* * We rushed info each other's arms." 
After their embrace they went down- 
stairs together, "and Richard called a 
cab, and he put me in and told the man 
to drive about anywhere. He put his 
arm round my waist, and I put my head 
on his shoulder." 

Mr. Arundell was approached, and 

yielded an unwilling consent to their 
marriage; but Mrs. Arundell remained 
steadfast in her opposition. "As we 
cannot get your mother's consent, we bad 
better marry without it," said Burton. 
" No," replied Miss Arundell. "that will 

not do." "You and your mother," re- 
joined Burton, "have one characteristic 

in common — you are as obstinate as 
mules." and he went off to study the 
Mormons in Salt Lake City. By the end 
of the year he was back, and this time 
bis persuasions conquered Miss Arundell, 
so they were married. 

Then followed the most splendid de- 



CHAS.MEINECKE 
& COMPANY 

Importers 



Temporary Offices: 

1003 1-2 BROADWAY ROOM 15 
OAKLAND 



' 









man 
: .-• ii- 1 
; an 1 
ami lh«>n 

rton; 

i. tint inu.-l 
mil contriving I 

l> i m ronvirtiil in tin' Roman Catholic 

faith. She carried abonl with her n Ihii- 

ili- .if li.ih water fur baptismal pui 

nml had mi altar nt her house ni which 

mtinnal prayers fur her 

mil's conversion. But Burton was 

• f tin- world, and bore all this 

with admirable complacency, chaffing 

her gently in moments of too great fer- 

iml always postponing the hour of 

inversion. 

In hastening to th oe in this 

narrative, we must ask the reader to con- 
sider that Lady Burton fought like a 
tiL'er for her husband in the matter of 
his worldly interest, and was forever 
championing him against the bitter at- 
tacks of his innumerable enemies. She 
it was who kepi his place in society, who 
won for him the reward of a K. C. M. G., 
and secured for him those various ap- 
pointments whereby this terrible spend- 
thrift was just enabled to live. She was 
lik'p a tiger fighting for one of her cubs 
when Burton's fame was in question. Her 
whole life was given to his honor and 
glory. Let this always be remembered of 
her. 

And now we come to the scene in 

which we find the mighty lion stretched 

upon his death bed, with the beautiful 

woman bending over him — hungry 

for his soid. 

"I am dyin? : I am dead!" cried the 
wounded lion, and on her knees Lady 
Burton prayed her "heart out to God to 
keep his soul there till the priest ar- 
rived." He was dead. The priest came. 
Lady Burton insisted that her husband 
was still alive. "Lose not a moment,"' 
cried the distracted woman, "for the soul 
is passing away." And so " the last com- 
forts " were administered by the priest 
to the dead body, and Ladv Burton was 
able to claim that her husband died a 
member of the Eoman Church. We 
shudder at all this; to manv it will seem 
as foolish as vain ; but let us remember 
(he long years of devotion, the patient life 
given to her husband's fame. 

What followed will have more interest 
for our readers. Burton, up to the time 
of his death, had been working upon the 
translation of an Eastern work called 
" The Scented Garden." Beading over 
this manuscript, Ladv Burton was 
shocked to find that it dealt with subjects 
which English literature never touches. 
But the notes of the great Oriental 
scholar, as well she knew, were of such 
extraordinary value to serious men that, 
even in her hatred of the loathesome sub- 
ject, she felt that the work was far too 
precious to be thrown away. She may, 
too, have reflected (in her poverty) that 
the manuscript meant thousands of 
pounds to her. 

She looked up from the papers, and 



thai 

ti in ix I : nml tl> 

: would be 

iund study. B 

■ retunu d, each tunc ex- 
claiming " in n sterner nml more au- 
thoritative 1 oil ' : ' Bui I 

" By this time." Bays Mr, Wright in his 
Sir Richard Bun. .u. " her 
excitement bud passed nway, and a holy 
joy irradiated her soul. She took up the 
manuscript, and then sorrowfully, rev- 
erently, and in fear and trembling, 
burned it sheet after sheet, until (lie 
whole was consumed. As each lea! 

licked up by the fire ii Beei 1 to her thai 

'a fresh ray of lighl mel peace' trans- 
fused the soul of her beloved husband. 

For ibis deed — rightly or wrongly — 

Lady Burton was condemned by the 

whole of Europe. To us it seems a fitting 

conclusion to a passionate adoration 

which had by the very force of its earnest- 
ness, all the color and fire and supersti- 
tion of a mad fanaticism. We do not 
know that Lady Burton could have fin- 
ished her extravagant worship in a man- 
ner more dramatic and astounding. And 
— we forsive her. — Tid-Bits. 



.1 BIGOTTED AND STUPID LOT. 

" We. the Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union of Watsonville, standing for 
those principles which uplift humanity 
and tend to a proper observation of God's 
holy day. desire to most earnestly protest 
against the Sunday afternoon band con- 
certs. We believe that it is contrary to 
the conscience of a large proportion of 
the community, therefore let us have it 
some evening when no conscience need be 
violated. 

"MBS. JAMES COTTRELL, Sup't." 

It is in Watsonville that the band plays. 
and it is said to be a good band, and the 
ladies of the W. C. T. IT. do not aver that 
it is not tuneful. Mrs. James Cottrell rep- 
resents a sentiment, and as such became 
the vehicle through which the above pro- 
test, was voiced. It is not stated that the 
tuba player ranged a note or two too high, 
nor was the picollo too strident, but the 
resolutions say that the band's blasts did 
not tend "to uplift humanity to a proper 
observance of the Lord's day!" 

The sentiment, expressed in these reso- 
lutions belongs 'wav back in the days of 
New England blue laws, scarlet letter 
times, and does not merit a moment's con- 
sideration at the hands of modern, sensi- 
ble California people, except to be ex- 
hibited as something extraordinary and 
stupid. These people are the apostles of 
darkness and gloom, and they would de- 
prive mankind of Sunday sunshine and 
jollity. Why do they not form a colony 
somewhere and gloom together? 



See Spences 



Invisible, neatest eyeglass in the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL CO. 
1315 Golden Gate Avenue at Fillmore 



CHINN-BERETTA OPTICAL COMPANY 



Have Located at 



1821 Fillmore Street 

Between Bush and Sutter Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 



OAKLAND OFFICE 466 13TH STREET 



One Paper City 

Oakland, population 105,000. Suburbs 
75,000, has one great evening newspaper, 

The Tribune 



Exclusive Associated Press Dispatches. 
Inside political news. All the society 
news. 14 to 26 pages each day. 



FOR CONVENIENCE, 
always have a supply of Borden's Eagle Brand 
Condensed Milk on hand. Suitable for all house- 
hold purposes. For puddings, cake and all kinds 
of desserts. Send for Recipe Book, 108 Hudson 
street, New York. 



MURPHY GRANT & GO. 

Wholesale and Dry Goods 

8th and Franklin Streets, - - Oakland, Cal. 

New goods constantly arriving and on sale 
at our temporary quarters, Eight and Franklin 
Streets, Oakland, Cal. 

The erection of a new steel structure will im- 
mediately be commenced on our old site, Bush 
and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 

W. and J. SLOANE & GO. 

Temporary offices: 
1730 Pacific Ave., San Francisco Cor.14th and Franklin Sts.,Oakland 

Absolutely the Best French Laundry Work 

AT MODERATE PRICES 

E. CANDEVAN, 

1925 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone West 1901 

J. G. Lubben Geo. Lubben 

Tel. Alameda 500 

West End Livery Stable 

1701, 1703, 1705, 1707, 1709 

WEBSTER STREET, 

Cor. Pacific Ave., - Alameda, Cal. 



30 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1906 



IkiMTJlInKS© 



Two Radical Needs. 

It was noted at the time of the recenl 
lire and earthquake horrors in San Fran- 
cisco thai certain English papers 
took occasion to warn British insurance 
companies against investing in America. 
" that land of sudden calamities." 

Americans have so long been wont to 
look on the] [selves as a chosen people and 
their land as one of special promise thai 
this foreign point of view seems to them 
almost sacrilegious. Certainly, however, 
the records would seem to show a de- 
pressing array of figures pointing to un- 
precedented losses through earthquake, 
fire. Hood, accidents on railroads, on 
bridges, in mines, in tunnels, in fac- 
tories, apartment houses, and all nianuei 

of lofty and weighty structures. The 
plain lesson of these casualties, in very 
many eases, is that the American people 
with all their genius and versatility at 
ai hieving new effects ami compassing new 
ends, arc not thoroughly familiar with 
the proper uses and limitations of the 
building materials they employ. 

During the past live years, the annual 
fire lossin the United States has been 
$2.50 per capita, as compared with 33 
cents per capita in the larger European 
countries. During the last ten years the 
total fire losses in the United Stales 
amounted to $1,350,000,000. The insur- 
ance companies paid out in this period 
$897,000,000, and it is reasonable to as- 
sume that the premiums paid by the peo- 
ple of the country during the same 
length of time for protection against fire 
exceeded these figures. The old proverb 
about the relative value of an ounce of 
prevention and a pound of cure would 
seem to have some application to the 
situation. 

The amount of money spent by the peo- 
ple individually and collectively in rear- 
ing temporary structures of doubtful 
value is colossal. The Government is now 
,.■. pending $20,000,000, and the country 

$1,000,000,1 yearly in building I 

construction work. Judged by the lessons 
of the last decade, much of this sum will 
go up in smoke or collapse in indistin- 
guishable ruins before all of u^ aiv dead. 
It is clear, therefore, to every thinking 
businessman that two things are 

needed. They are ( 1 i re\ ision of the 

building laws and [■>.) accurate knowledge 

concerning the Btrength, fire-resistance, 
ami other properties el' building mater- 
ials. 
The United States Geological Survey 

lias made certain tests of structural mater- 
ials, especially cement and concrete, dur- 
ing the last tew years. It- work in this 

direction might be greatly enlarged with 
untold benefit to the nation. It is esti- 
mated that investigations such as it pro- 
poses to make would lessen the quantity 

and improve the quality of materials used 
and cause a saving of lull) 5 per ceni of 
the total expenditure. This would amouni 

to a saving „f $l.tii)0. ..early in the 

work of the Government alone, and cer- 
tainly many millions of dollars annually 
in work done by the States, cities and 
people of the country. Indirectly, 



the knowledge obtained from such inves- 
tigations would save many more millions 
by diminishing the COsI of insurance ami 

preventing much of the terrible less of 
life and property from lire. 

It is proposed that these investigations 
he conducted by members of the ecologi- 
cal Survey, but under a heard on which 
are representatives of the \'a\y Depart- 
ment, the War I lep.iriment ( isthmian 
Canal Commission and Corps id' Engi- 
neers), the Treasury Department (Super- 
vising Architect), and the national engi- 
neering and architectural societies of the 
country. This arrangement will prevent 
the duplication id' such work ill different 

departments. 

* * * 

Some Insurant e Dividends.. 

The London and Lancashire Life As- 
surance Company announces that a half- 
year]} dh idend to June 30th at the rate 

of ■-"-' per .-hare per annum will he payable 

mi July 2d. The directors of the Sea ln- 
surarn e I (ompany ( Limited ) have r ;- 
solved to declare an interim dividend, free 
el' income lav. of $1.48 per share, being 
at the rate of 30 per cent, per annum. 
'I he directors of the Reliance Marine In- 
surance Companv have declared an in- 
terim dividend of $.48 per share, tree of 

income-tax. 

* * * 

Insurant e in France.. 

The new French law provides that all 
American insurance comics, doing business 

in France, must invest strictly in French 
securities to the full amount of the legal 
reserve on policies written in France This 
edict, if applied to the life companies 
would hit the Mutual Life of New fork 
lather hard, for it would have to segre- 
gate $15,000,000 to s;-.'o.onii. ooo for this 
purpose. 

Resignation and Promotion. 

George S. Cockran is the new presi- 
dent of the Pacific Mutual Lib' Insurance 
Company. Wilbur Tupper voluul.n i] ] 

resigned the position some I ime ago. M r. 
t lochran lias been < ice-presidenl of the 
company, ami will he succeeded in that 
position by .Mr. Gale I!. Johnson, who 
is advanced from the position of third 
vice-president. 



e 



*\ 



E. MESSAGER'S 

Cloak 

and 

Suit 
Store 



1 732 Steiner Street,, San Francisco 

The newest and the most fashionable 
styles are ready for inspection. For this 
week we are showing a lot of fancy 
long coats in fancy styles and latest 
weaves, $6.00. 



V 



J 



W. R. GRACE & GO. 

Importers of cement 

and Structural Steel 

TEMPORARY OFFICE 

NEW TRIBUNE BUILDING 

8th Street Oakland 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and commission merchants 
General Agents 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

(Standard Portland Cement.) 

OCEANIC DOCK 

Also temporary office 1112 Broadway, 

Oakland. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London, England 



This corporation, May 17th, gave notice to their policyholders in the San Francisco con- 
flagration, through the local papers and otherwise, that they extended time for giving 
notice of loss and filing loss claims to September 1 , 1 906. 

We have already- settled on an honorable basis and paid over 350 claims. 



Dickson CBl, Thieme, Managers 

ADJUSTING DEPARTMENT, 

ACENCY OFFICES, 900 Eddy Street 



1788 POST STREET 












BANKINC 



Til Cailiu Bilk ol CoMerw 

*n.*:s*mAlr.J Ih* lUnk of 
MEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

IM.000.000 

ItlTORY- I'Jirion nn.l Wlilt,- 

IN UNITE '■• and 

■ ering the piincl- 
:i. Manitoba 

Bank. 
1'nltin of London and Smith's 
Ltd 
AOKNTS IN CHICAGO— The First National 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS The Comnior- 

. i:il National Bank. 

San Francisco Office — 325 California Street. 

A. K.utt.a. M.m.iiier. Bruce UeathCOta, Assist- 
ant Miin.iKtT. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd, 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscrihod Capital, $i:..V'rt,000 

•up Capital, $2,000,000 
Reserve Pund, $i.:'U0.0O0 
MKAD OFFICE 40 Threadneedle St.. Lon- 
don, E. C. 

ota — New York — Agency of the London, 
Paris a nil American Bank. Limited, No. 10 
Wall street, X. v.: Paris — Messrs. Lazard 

17 Boulevanl Poissonier. Draw 
direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial ami Travelers" Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. 
GREEN, Sub-Manager; R. ALTSCHUL, Cash- 
ier. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building al 710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 300.000 

Surplus 320.000 

Deposits, January 1, 1906 10,213,801 

James P. Phelan, President; S. G. Murphy, 
Vice-President; James A. Hooper, Vice-Presid 
ent; George A. Story, Cashier; C. B. Hobson, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, 
John A. Hooper, James Moffltt, Frank J. Sul- 
livan. Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Jas. 
M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on ap- 
proved securities. 

. Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, 
Fargo & Co., or exchange on city banks. 

Security Savings Bank 

316 Montgomery .Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 500,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 280,000 

Banking by mail a specialty 

Directors— William Babcock, S. L. Abbott, 
O. D. Baldwin. Jos. D. Grant, E. J. McCut- 
chen. L. F. Monteagle, R. H. Pease, Warren 
D. Clark, James L. Flood, J. A. Donohoe, John 
Parrott, Jacob Stern. 

The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. 

Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $700,000 
The bank transacts a general banking busi- 
ness, sells drafts, makes telegraphic transfers, 
and issues letters of credit available through- 
out the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILENTHAL. 
m „„ „„ Managers. 

T. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. 
Guaranteed Capital and Surplus. .$2,526,763.61 
Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash .. 1,000,000.00 
Deposits, December 30, 1905 39,112,812.82 

F. Tillman, Jr., President; ' Daniel Meyer, 
First Vice-President; Emil Rohte. Second 
Vice-President; A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; 
William Herrmann, Asst. Cashier; George 
Tourney. Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secre- 
tary; W. S. Goodfellow, General Attorney. 

Directors— F. Tillman, Ji-., Daniel Meyer, 
Emil Rohte, Ign. Steinhart, L N. Walter, N. 
Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. Kruse, W. S. 
Goodfellow. 



B ANKINC 

French American Bank. 



Till I// 

«'.,-u! C..I ■ » I 000.000 

-I, M» Cm. 

k. 'I Imu oft ° £*" , , 

\ sweel abandon in my lad *""■ 



Amber-hued panacea for mv woes and 

ills. 

Thou needsl no cursed encomium from 

those 
\Vhi> try sweel resignation fi>r their 

Ami claim thy warmth and peace the 

pace thai kills. 
Willi,, mi thy charms there still would 

flourish sin — 
Why weep if thy warm kisses lei the 

devil in r 

Poised in the air nrj glass, 1 quaff to 
thee, 
linker and breaker of a thousand 
bonds : 

Cares disappear when wave thy magic 
wands. 

And wedlock's prison sets its captives 

free. 

Weaver of destinies! Progenitor of 

thought and wit ! 
Life would be unworth while with 

thee immune from it. 
— Charles Ellmore Nettleton in Broad- 
inuj Magazine. 



THE TOUCH OF A HAND. 
At times when the world seems dead, 

And the heart is bound in frost, 
Where every bird or blossom 

Forgotten is, or lost; 
A hand is laid in ours — 

All, the world is not so wrong, 
And for every bud that blooms 

The heart leaps up in song! 
— Margaret Bidgely Scliott in Munsey's. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

Corner Market, Jones and McAllister Sis., San Francisco 
At a regular meeting nf the Board of Directors of this society held 
June 27. Ifliio, » dividend lius lu-on declared at the rate of three mid 
unc-half (3 1-2) per cent tier annum On all depOBitS for the six month 
ending June 80. 19<I<1. free from all taxes and payable on and nftcr 
duly 2, 1908. Dividends not called for are added to and bear the same 
rate of interest as the principal from July 1st. 1000, 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Columbus Savings & Loan Society 

Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets, 

For the half year ending June HO, 1006, a- divioend has heen de- 
clared at the rate of three and six-lmilhs |:i u-10] percent per iitiiiinii 
mi nil deposits, free of taxes, payaolo on and after MONDAY, July '2. 
10(10, Dividends not milled f..r are added lo and bear tile same rate of 
interest as the principal from July 1, 1000. 
F.IN. BEL GRAW.CashJer. 1. W. HELLMAN,Jr.,Presiden t 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Humboldt Savings Bank 

020 Market Street 

For the half year ending June 80, WOO, a dividend on all savings 
deposits has been declared al. tlio rale of throe and six-tenths \,\ i.-inj 
per cent per annum, freo of taxed, payable on and after MONDAY, 
July 2nd, MOB. Dividends not called for lire added I" and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal from July 1st, IWtl, 

W. E. PALMKR. Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Savings and Loan Society 

101 Montgomery Street, corner Sutter 
Has declared a dividend for the term ending June 80, 1000, al tbft 

rate of three nod ..iu-half [tt 1-2 per cent per annum on all .lc i-sil* 

free of taxes, and nay - "» «»<1 »Hcr July 2 1000. D.v.d.m. \, ...... 

called for are addo.l to and bear the sumo rate of interest as principal, 
EDWIN BONNELL, Cashier. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., Corner Sutter. 

■ 
AinliMiiz,..i t,, 

Snli.lt.. I I | Pnj- 

lnjf» \ num. 



Member Stock 

and Bond Exchange. 

J. C. Wilson 

BROKER 

STOCKS and BONDS. [INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 
Telephone Temporary 815 KOHL BUILDING 



New York — Phone Call 3177 Broad. 

E. F. Hutton & Co., Bankers 

Members New York Stock Exchange, New 
York Coffee Exchange, New York Cotton 
Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade. 
33-35 New St., Branch 547 Fifth 
Ave., NEW YORK. 
PRIVATE WIRE. 
Richard E. Mulcahy, Manager. 
490 California Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
424 Tenth Street. Oakland, Cal. 



J. Barth & Co. 

2295 Franklin Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

STOCKS AND BONDS 

INFORMATION ON ALL INVESTMENT 
SECURITIES 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Company 

Corner California ami Montgomery Streets 

For the six months undine Juno 30, 1000, dividends have boon de- 
clared on the deposits in the savings department of this company as 
follows: On term deposits at tile rate »r :i 0-10 per cent per 
and on ordinary deposits at tlio rate of 8 1-2 per cent per anm 
free of taxes, and payable on and after MONDAY. July 9, 10011. 

J, DALZEIX BROWN, Manager. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 



of Market and Church »t« 



i Fri 



Has declared for the six months ending Juno 80, 1000, a dividend 
Of five per cent per annum on ordinary doposlbt, six per cent on term 
doposita, and sis per cent on monthly payment Investments. Interest 
on deposits payable on and after July 1st, Interest dii ordinary de- 
posits ii"l called for will be added to (lie principal and thereafter hear 
interest at the same rote. 

WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
WILLIAM CORB1N, Secretary. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 190G 



THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA. 
The first concert of the summer season 
at the Greek Theatre was held hist Thurs- 
day, ami the theatre was about two-thirds 
filled. The audience was a cultured and 
appreciative one, but did not. warm up to 
rapture and applause until after the 
" da use Maeabee " of Saint-Saens. This 
is a grotesque dance, a death waltz, and 
it is full of weird melodies and striking 
instrumentation. There is the rustle of 
leaves and the dancing of many imps and 
nymphs, the chatter of voices and the 
clatter of dancing Eeet and sybillant 

sounds singing swift requiems. "Fidclin." 
Beethoven's only attempt in the operatic 
line, was rendered splendidly as 
the fourth number on the programme. 
The Brahm '•Academic Festival Over- 
ture '" evoked considerable applause, and 
was the final one of five fine numbers. 

The programme for this Thursday is 
as follows : 

1. Quartette in C Major, Mozart; %. (a) 
Serenade, Haydn, (b) Traumerei, Schu- 
mann, (c) Minuet, P.occherini ; 3. Quar- 
tette in ]) Minor, Op. 75, Bazzini. 



/" 



THE MIRACLE WORKERS. 
Old silver is being made new by the 
deft workers in the manufacturing depart- 
ment of Hammersmith & Field, at their 
new store, corner of Van Ness and Eddy. 
Loved relies, dinner sets, spoons, teapots, 
quaint cups and salvers are being remod- 
eled and made new by the silversmiths 
employed by this enterprising and well- 
known firm. Bright and beautiful is the 
rehabilitation of old battered and burned 
silver, and a visit to Hammersmith & 
Field's to see the wonder workers is well 
worth the trouble. 



GROWING IN PUBLIC FAVOR. 

The White automobile demonstrated its 
lasting qualities and absolute reliability 
during the great San Francisco lire. The 
factory has been rushed to fill orders, and 
the representatives at San Francisco soon 
after the destruction of the city had sold 
out every available machine, so great was 
the demand for the incomparable modem 
steam machine — the White. 



Til E REALM OF THE DRESSER. 
It is gratifying to record that the 
many "Goodform " devices of the Chi- 
cago Form Company are to be bad of the 
Palace Hardware Company. Trousers 
anil coat bangers and all good-form sets 
that go so far to completing the equip- 
ment of a gentleman's wardrobe, are 
made by the Chicago Form Co. 

Cash Capital. Sl'ufl.llOO. Cash Assots, $539,512.25 

Pacific Coast Casualty Go. 

of California. 
Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, 
Elevators, Workmen's Collective, Vessels, Bur- 
glary. Plate Glass insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green. President; John 
C. Coleman. Vice-President; F. A. Zane, Secre- 
tary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deer- 
ing, Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Botliin. Edward 
L. Brayton. John C .Coleman, F. P. Deering, 
E. F. Green. I. W. Hellman. Jr., Georpe A. 
Pope. Henrv Rosenfeld, Adoiph A. Son, William 
S. Tevis. 
Temporary office, 2324 Clay St., San Francisco. 

Marshal A. Frank Company, General Agents 
for California. 

Kohl Building, San Francisco. 



NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



■\ 



Montpelier, Vermont. 



G. M. STOLP &. SON, General Manager 



Temporary office now located at 801 Union Savings Bank building, Oakland, Gal., 
where all communications regarding extensions, lost policies, etc. should be addressed. ,n 



California Insurance Company 

Of San Francisco 

Head Office (after June 1st), - No. 230 California St., S.F. 

Time for giving notice of loss or filing proofs will be extended 
on request. Our adjusters will make up proofs of all losses 
adjusted without expense to claimants. 

M. A. NEWELL, President. 
GEO. W. BROOKS, Secretary. 



American Central Insurance Company of st Louis, mo. 

Saint Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of st. pam, Minn. 
Mercantile Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of Boston, Mass. 



HOLDERS OF POLICIES in the nhnve companies, covering property in vol red in San Francisco conflagration. 

hereby notified that notice of I»sh is waived. POLICY HOLDERS should, however send us their present add 

TIME FOR FILING PROOFS OF LOSS is hereby extended to August lSlh. 

P-ili. II- • .in ohlitin r.'oinl Uicrtnif ut nnr Oakland office. 

Claimants need not incur expense of the employment Of attorneys, as lo: 

by our adjusters. 

Office for the adjustment of losses and fur country business. Telegraph A 

Ollko for San Francisco city business, 715 Van New Avenue. 



Policy holders who have lost their 
■o will be adjusted and proofs made 
iuo and Twentieth street, Oakland, 



GHRISTENSEN, EDWARDS & GOODWIN, Managers 



New England Mutual 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

918 ElliS Street ABOVE VAN NESS AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. 

HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent 
Policy holders please send addresses that notification may be 

given as usual. 



Notice 



Mortgagors of HIBERNIA BANK who have not yet 
made their proofs of loss at the Bank please call 
immediately and do so. 

The Hibernia Savings and LoanSociety 

By R. J, TOBIN, Secretary. 



Continental 
Casualty Company 

CHICAGO 

Write* all form* of Accident and Health 
Insurance. 

Saved all It* record* and I* doing bull 
nes* as heretofore. 

Producers and all others interested address 

W. H. BETTS, 

Manager. 

54 and 55 Bacon Building, Oakland, Cal. 

Paul M. Nippert Co. inc. 

General Agents 

The /Etna Indemnity Co. 

George F. Hatton, - Attorney 

Surety Bonds. 
Plate Glass, 
Burglary. 



1844- Sutter Street, Corner Webster 

San Francisco 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

of Philadelphia, Penn. 
Alliance of Philadelphia 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 5,622,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 
538 San Pablo Ave., Oakland. 



AACHEN & MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE CO. 
HANOVER FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CESAR BERTHEAU, MANAGER; AL- 
FRED R. GRIM, ASSISTANT-MANAGER. 
N. E. CORNER CLAY AND ELEVENTH 
STREETS, OAKLAND, CAL. 

Pacific Surety Company 

of CALIFORNIA 
FIDELITY COURT AND CONTRACT 
BONDS 
PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Bonds for lost policies, bank books, or 
change of occupancy will be furnished by 
this Company. 

Paid-up Capital $250,000 

Cash Assets : 428,000 

Officers: Wallace Everson, President; 
John Bermingham, Vice-President ; A. P. 
Redding, Secretary. 

Temporary office, 652 Broadway, 

Oakland, California. 

1 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Go,, Ltd 

of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents, 

San Francisco 



416 Jackson St. 



Fir*. Marine and Inland Insurance. 

Fireman's Fund 

Insurance Company of 9an Francisco. Cal 

Capital. $1,000,000. Asset*. $6,500,000 

Odd Fellows' Building, < 

Cor. Eleventh and Franklin St*., Oakland. 

C. J. STOVEL 

Temporary headquarters 

Bacon Building .... Oakland 

Phone Oakland 987. 

Our clients and friends are requested to 
renew their policies and bring in notices 
of loss to the above address. 

The London Assurance Corporation 
Niagara Fire Insurance Co. 

W. J. LANDERS, Pac. Coast Manager 
Reeds Hall, 13th and Harrison Sts., Oakland 

Phenix Insurance Company 

of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

J. H. LENEHAN, General Agent. 

A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast. 

Temporary Offices: 

Polytechnic Hall, Corner 12th and Harrison Sts. 

Oakland 

North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company 

Of London and Edinburgh. 
Combined Assets Over 
Eighty-Seven Millions. 
To the Public and Our Patrons: 

The North British will pay all fire 
losses just as soon as adjusted. Our of- 
fice for handling all loss claims is locat- 
ed in the Tribune building, northwest 
corner of Eighth and Franklin streets, 
Oakland. Our office for genral fire busi- 
ness is at 2027 Sutter street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Tom C. Grant, General Agent for Pacific Department. W. J 
Nichols, Genera) Adjuster. 

Fire Marine 

New Zealand Ins. Co. 

Auckland, N. Z. 

Cash Capital $1,250,000. 

Reserves $2,025,000. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders 



312 California St. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Fire Insurance Losses 



ConWntil Budding and loin Amciitio* 



Offices: Cor. Market and Church Sts. 

OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 

l> WaJmso. Dad*. W3ks. Cart... 

I'mdrM Sec. and O 



Pacific Department 

NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE 
SOCIETY 

of Norwich, England 



ROOM 88, BACON BLOCK, 
Oakland California 

Scottish Union and National Ins. Go. 

Of Edinburgh, Scotland 



Established 1824 

Capital. $30,000,000 Assets over $45,000,000 

Temporary offices, 468 Eleventh Street, Bacon 
Block, Oakland, Cal. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

of Hartford. Established 1850. 











Surplus to Policy Holders 


2.729, 1 73 



BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific 
Department, 525 13th St., Oakland. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent. 



JUST FILL THE BILL 

The Rio Grande 
Scenic Line Excursions 

For Women 
and Children . 
Traveling Alone 

Personally Conducted to the East 
NO CHANGE OF CARS 

Details — also free books of 
travel, handsomely Illustrated, 
may be had of 

W. J. SHOTWELL, General Agent 
DENVER AND RIO GRANDE R. R. 
1070 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAL. 




The 



Egyptian 
Cigarette 
of Quality 

AROMATIC DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

"°UR.ITY 



At your Club or Dealer's or 
THE SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 




tfEADACHt-^ 

ONLY roURfTlMEslN CoMPE'i IT10N 
R)URTlME| ) ~tl\IUMPHA.NJ 

P/VRI^-ST L 0UI^-LlEGe-P 0RTL»ND 

! Official WfflSKE/ Of-The 
I U.S.MARlNfrtlOSPltrVL 

H.W.OLMSTED .-*-* 

I PiCIFlC-COAST-REPRESENTATIve- 6 " 

II HrtPsaT ai D: SAN FRANC. S^d. 



ZADIG & CO 

STOCK BROKERS 

Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed busineu in their 

own building 
324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New 

San Francisco Stock and Exchange Building 




133 Spear Street, San Francisco. 



Edward B. Haldon 

..INSURANCE BROKER.. 

Fire : : Marine : : Casualty 

482 California Street ... San Francisco 

Telephone Weal 33 1 5 

Oakland Branch - . - . 270 I I ih Street 

Telephone Oakland 7327 



ADJUSTERS: 

0. A. Spencer 
E. J. Jolly - 
E. B. De Golia 



APPRAISERS: 

Warren S. While' 

Frank C. Birch 

E. R. Smith of Fresno 



Your Insurance Business Solicited 



J 



Back East 

On certain dates in July, August and September the Santa 
Fe will sell round-trip tickets to the East and back at 

Half Rates 



Santa fe 

% w 



These tickets will be good on the 

California Limited 

Three days to Chicago 

Four days to New York and Boston 

TICKET OFFICES 
Ferry Building, San Francisco 
1112 Broadway, Oakland 
130 J Street., Sacramento 
23 South First. St,., San Jose 
1031 J Street., Fresno 




S »M r«Miei* eo 



•\ 



NewsMett 

titaUf r n t ii X& to rti s jc r. 



adMM -., 




VOL. LXXI 



San Francisco, Cal., July 14, 1906. 



No. 27 



TW SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER » printed and puhnahrd cwr Salurdar bv ihr 
Pnvatu. Fmlnrk Mamon. Saa Franmco. C«l . II WS LincoUl Atr . Alamoda. C«l . and 1121 
LananSt . TtarprW Alaaarda 11)1. San Franorco. \* '«■ 3W 
E a *n i J ,1 AUwrA PoatoaWc as aprond dan. Matter 

N«w York O fcet---(wt n* tnlornaapon mar be obtained retarding luracripaons and adtemnne) 
206 Bmhw. C C. MarpfiT. Rrprarouivr London OSor— 30 Corneal). E. C . Eroland. 
Greene Street fc Co 

Al Mxsal ilem*. laaai wtiiitu b, tuning, commercial and financial new, note*, adteil i aftnenti or other 
■inn ■tjniiiil for pubicanon. in the current number of the NEWS LETTER ihould be rent to the 
Alameda naarf not later than Fridar raomtnB. 



Announcement 



The Business Office of the NEWS LETTER is located at 1121 
Laguna Street, San Francisco. Address all communications to the 
Editorial rooms, 90S Lincoln Avenue, Alameda, temporary office. 
Telephone Alameda 1131. 

Gladstone called the House of Lords "the last fortress 

of privilege." The American Senate is the boudoir of the 
billionaire. 

The Russian Bear seems to be on top in all the invest- 
ments markets, though the British Bull is getting his horns un- 
der the beast. 

The only Idling the matter with the business streets of 

San Francisco is they need cleaning up, and rows of sky- 
scrapers along either side. 

When a man whom you cannot exactly locate in your 

memory rushes up to shake hands, you will he Quite sale in 

asking what office he is after. 

There is this about pushing the trusts too close to the 

wall : They can always raise prices to pay the cost. Always and 
always the people pay the freight. 

One thing is certain, and that is the determination of 

the American people to never elect a man to the presidency 
who parts his hair in the middle. 

Instead of enforcing the lese majeste rule in Russia, the 

Czar merely tells his detainers to go to where the worm diet!) 
not. This is the better way by all odds. 

The old-time political cinch is losing its grip all over. 

It is not so much as it used to be, when the political boss thun- 
dered " the cattle on a thousand hills are mine." 

Tainted politics anil tainted money have formed a com- 
bination to hold onto San Francisco indefinitely, without refer- 
ence to the wishes of good people or common decency. 

If Oakland is really anxious to commit suicide, let 

her change her name to "East San Francisco." The tail end 
of the animal is good to brash flies oil', hut it is never pictur- 
esque. 

Not to have even the appearance of desiring to discrimi- 
nate, the party who runs California's earthquake business is 
treating all parts of the country to shocks. That's right. Pass 
them around. 

The main reason why the Standard Oil Company escapes 

tin' argus eyes of anti-monopolv legislation is that it has a 
buy-product which is housed in banks out of sight of those 
not directly interested in it. 

Have you noticed how glaringly straw, shavings, chips, 

whet-stones and limelcss mortar show up in the debris of the 
wrecked City Hall? And the contract called I'm- the very best 
materials known to the building husiness. and. what is more 
to the point, a new edifice is to he erected. These are times 
■ when tax-payers should do a whole lot more watching than the 
other thing. 



There seems to he a previousness about the Bryan boom. 

loner • Folk, of Missouri, was noi consulted, and hi- friends 

claim that he already holds three aces and i- confident of the 
fourth. 

For the real article in the buneo line, jusl take a glimpse 

.n the fellows who are drawing $6,000 a year to "husband'' 

tin- relief fund, which i em- to over $6,000, and more 

coming. 

The shacks and sheds in 9an Francisco will do lirst-ralc 

for temporary use, bul where and when is temporary 

leave oil' and the real thing begin? A whole !"t depends on thai 

question. 

Strangers will please not comment on the "thrill of the 

desolation" as they would in the corpse of m gianl : besides, San 
Francisco is only a wounded warrior, and will soon lie in the 

thick of it again. 

The question is. has a Texas cyclone any advantages that 

would give it preference over an earthquake? 'I he latter leaves 
a fellow at Inane and the former is likely to oblige him to walk 
home from the next county. 

A New York judge holds that tin' woman who is run- 
ning after J. Pierpont Morgan to marry him is not crazy, hut 
very rash. This vindicates the rigid of women to ask for what 
they want when it is not in sight. 

Anyway, most of the restaurants in the burnt districl 

are educational. They teach a mail' how not to hi' fussy or par- 
ticular, hut to take witat he can get, and move: besides, what is 
the use of napkins and linger howls when in a hurry? 

San Francisco has as much ground as ever for building 

business and rash of trade. Now rush the debris out of the way 
and set the architects and building trades to work, and very 
soon only a dim recollection of the great disaster will he left. 

The late United States Senator Gorman died rich. Bul 

do not all United States Senators die rich these days. The 
"main chance" and "get there. Eli," is whal "e pluribus 
unum" stands for, as those wise ami dignified patriots under- 
stand it. 

Unless a close watch is kept up, several new millionaires 

will be born of San Francisco's distress. Ban-els of money will 
he required to rebuild city, school and other public buildings, 
and unless strings are tied to (hem every other barrel will go 
to " extras." 

Factory made hash came near killing a lot of soldiers 

in the Presidio last week, and still there are those Bfho proles! 
against Government inspection of packing house products. 
However, this is a free country, and those who prefer to have 
their meats embalmed before eating should have them that way. 

It is absolutely and unqualifiedly false that fte Statu 

Christian Endeavorer Union, while 
appointed a committee 1<> go over 
Schmitz combine. Even Christia 



in convention last week 
over and " labor " with the Buef- 

ian missionaries have to draw 



the line at the impossible. No, the combine is Bphraimitsh 

and joined to its idol— the relief fund. 

_A Post-office interdicted Socialistic-Anarchistic publica- 
tion has the insolence to call itself "Appeal to Reason." In 
fact it is an unreasonable newspaper monstrosity, based upon 
the 'assumption, as an excuse for its existence, that all men and 
all women are vile, and only waiting for a favorable opportunity 
to lint in practice publicly what is now forbidden by decency 
everywhere. And yet the impure and seditious sheet has a fol- 
lowing. Does personal liberty mean so much? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1-1, 190<; 



THE SCARCITY OF LABOR. 

There is a scarcity of labor all over the United States, and 
the howl goes up from the farms of Minnesota to the corn 
fields of Texas. In Texas the farmers are working night and 
day and Sundays. Texas is in a bad way. because all labor 
is intercepted by Oklahoma. Louisiana and Arkansas. In Cali- 
fornia, the situation among the hop growers, vineyard ists and 
farmers is slightly better, but the labor supply is far below 
the demand. Labor is wanted badly, and the East should 
unload its surplus population into the Southwest and West. 

In the skilled trades and in unskilled labor in the West, and 
especially in California, there is a woeful scarcity. This has 
been created by the dog-in-the-manger policy of the labor 
unions. The apprenticeship system has been crippled by syste- 
matic effort, till there are no young men growing up to take 
the places of their fathers. By this method the labor unions 
have added to the criminal class. They have established an 
unwritten law that relegates the sons of workingmen to the 
penitentiary or to the professional ranks. How many of these 
boys, of poor parentage, can afford to go through the neces- 
sary schooling to enter the professional ranks? The influence 
of the union is being used for the benefit of the present gen- 
eration, and the devot f union principles is following the 

theory of the motto: "After me comes the deluge, and the '< ;| 
take the hindmost."' This dog-in-the-manger theory i> making 
hoodlums and thieves of [die boys in every big city of the coun- 
trv. It is high tine- that the labor unions evolved some Moses 
to lead them out of the wilderness, and if this Moses doesnt 
soon appear, the public will reap a destructive whirlwind that 
will engulf the good and the bad alike. 

If it were possible to show these boys that they should go 
to the country, go to the grain fields of the San Joaquin, to 
the ranges of Kern, to the lumber camps of Shasta, to the 
vineyards of Kern, to the chicken ranches of Sonoma, and the 
thousand and one other places of the State at large, they 
would be saved to the world as good and useful citizens. 

The unionist has made this impossible by spoiling the boy'i 
mind at tin' same time that he deprived him of his opportunity 
to make a living at his father's trade. The union principle 
has made it impossible to reclaim, to reform the youth of the 
land. He is wed to city ideas. He has no education and no 
chance to acquire one, and his hands are tied in all directions, 
save those of crime. It is a dark and gloomy picture this 
systematic stunting of the opportunity of the growing boy, 
and yet it is a policy conceived by the boy's natural pro- 
tector. 



LITTLE PIGS AND BIO HOGS. 

San Francisco officialdom is in the middle of a little earth- 
quake, and a far greater shake is expected to develop all along 
the line almost any day. So long as the fountain is muddy, 
hogs will wallow in the stream that flows therefrom down the 
valley in which arc the caves and bungalows of public plunder 
concealment, and wherein the grafters congregate and divide. 
No doubt Ruef is right, according to his "idea," in or- 
dering Schmitz to cut the strings that bind many of the office- 
holders to a public desk, for Ruef plays politics of the most 
practical and business-like sort. He invests iti men for office- 
holding purposes as a rancher invests in pigs, looking for his 
profits when they become hogs. But there are many kinds 
of pigs, and only a few kinds become hogs of great enough 
capacity to devour the whole of the corn when the crop is 
extraordinarily large. 

The calamity which pounced down upon San Francisco on 
April 18th enlarged the fountain enormously, and the stream 
down the valley swelled beyond its banks, which in turn re- 
quired larger eaves and bungalows. The hogs that then wal- 
lowed in the filth of graft were of a breed that meet all re- 
quirements. But in the light of the millions of dollars that 
the calamity has set adrift on the bosom of the stream, these 
hogs look new-born pigs whose eyes are too weak to stand tin.' 
strain of the glitter of the new opportunities to feed. There- 
fore, they must hie themselves to the fastness of the hill.- thai 
hogs — big, strong hogs — may wallow ami wax fat. And from 
the view point of the City 'Hall gang, Ruef ami Schmitz are 
right. The calamity created opportunities for hogs, not for 
little pigs. 



THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

It has at length come to pass that the contentions of the pro- 
ponents of the "Mecklenburg Declaration'" have proven a 
clear case. North Carolina may now claim that she is the mother 
of independence. The town of Charlotte. Mecklenburg County, 
may justly say it is the cradle of independence, and it was from 
llus remote North Carolina town that the first pipings for ab- 
solute secession from Great Britain emanated. 

Recently discovered evidence goes to show that this " de- 
claration" was actually made on May 19, 1775, and that the 
original MSS. was transmitted lo the Continental Congress, then 
sitting at Philadelphia, ami that it was by the president 
of that body deemed "premature" in its resolutions. There 
can, in the light of recent discoveries, be little doubt as to the 
.late or authenticity of the declaration. Because of the fact 
thai this may be news to many of our readers, and for the 
reason that Thomas Jefferson and Richard Henry Lee are sup- 
posed to have been guilty of plagiarism in drafting the later 
and official document, adopted by Congress, assembled at Phila- 
delphia, the text of the Mecklenburg Declaration is given below: 

I. Resolved, That whoever directly or. indirectly abets, or in 
any way. form or manner countenances, the invasion of our 
rights, a6 attempted by the Parliament of Great Britain, is an 
enemy to his country, to America and to the rights of man. 

II. Resolved, That we. the citizens of Mecklenburg County. 
do hereby dissolve the political bonds which have connected us 
with the mother country, and absolve ourselves from all al- 
legiance to the British Crown, abjuring all political connec- 
tion with a nation that has wantonly trampled on our rights 
and liberties, and inhumanely shed innocent blood of Americans 
at Lexington. 

III. Resolved, That we do hereby declare ourselves a free 
and independent people; thai we an', and of right ought to be, 
a sovereign and self-governing people under the power of Cod 
and of the General Congress: to the maintenance of which in- 
dependence we pledge to each other our mutual co-operation, 
pur lives, our fortunes and our most sacred honor. 

IV. Resolved. That we hereby ordain and adopt as rules 
of conduct all and each of our former laws, and that the Crown 
of Great Britain cannot be considered hereafter as holding any 
rights, privileges or immunities amongst us. 

V. Resolved, That all officers, both civil and military, in 
this country, he entitled to exercise the same powers and au- 
thorities us heretofore, ami every member of this delegation 
shall henceforth be a civil officer and exercise the powers of a 
justice of the peace, issue process, hear and determine contro- 
versies, according to law. preserve peace, union and harmony 
in the county, anil use every exertion to spread the love of liberty 
and of country until a more general and better organized sys- 
tem of Government be established. 

VI. Resolved. That a copy of those re.-olulions be trans- 
milted by express to the President of the Continental Con- 
gress, assembled in Philadelphia, to be laid before that body. 



PI I / /. / 1 'PINE SELF-GO VERNM FN T. 

In the line of the general policy of giving the Filipino the 
largest measure of self-government, the courts have been given 
over almost entirely to the native jurists. Gregorio Arenato, 
a splendid Bpecimen of the enlightened native clement in the 
islands, and one who has been supreme judge and then solicitor- 
general of the islands, has now 1 n made attorney-general of 

the Insulin- Government, at a salary of $7,000 a year. 

Senor Arenato is thirty-five years of age. He has mastered 
the English language since the war, and can make an arguuiciu 
in court, in eil her tongue. 



DR. POIIEIM'S RETIREMENT. 

Dr. Poheim retires from the Police and Eealth Hoards with 

the respect of the community. The action is an entirelv volun- 
tary one, and it is said that the doctor will also give up the 
medical profession. He will engage in the crockery and glass- 
ware business. Dr. Poheim's resignation came at an inoppor- 
tune lime, because the public is apl to connect ii with the de- 
mands made for resignations by the Mayor, ll is safe to Baj 
that had the doctor desired to hold ihe commissionership, he 
might have 'lone BO indefinitely. 









DRBAD i UOLERA IN U iv 

lemberod at this 

hat tlini wonderful rnmcnt, tlu> 

Imml. *ml (1ml it is still il 
I 
'". ami tl available in the Philipp 

:lit U\ if iiti.l. • 
nnn-nt. In there can be nn 

manner of doubt Tl army, no I«hK .»f men, under 

imniand of am Oovcrnntenl on cat 

wfully with any problem tlmt may, by the foi 

them. Ami" in no departmeni 
truly demonstrated aa in the medical de- 
ltas been repeatedly shown in the United 
in Louisiana during the Bmall-pos and yellow fever 
epidemics, ami in Manila, on repeated occasions, aincj 
occupation of the islands. Certainly the efficiency of the army, 
in nil its branches, was demonstrated in San Francisco during 
■ ■mi. his times immediately after the greai fire. The 
sanitary mmps. the perfect order, the splendid hospital ser- 
tnd the very general devotion to duty, without graft, was 
always to he found in the military establishment, and not in 
the civil. Another element that will greatly assist in stamping 
out the plague in Manila is the vast number of the better vlass 
natives who haw ionic- t.. understand that American rule is 
beneficent rule, ami who. thus converted, stand ready to second 

the efforts of the authorities. Of murse. there are still thou- 
sands upon thousands of natives who know nothing of this, and 
who will Btubbomly fight every measure taken to protect them 
from the ravages of dread disease. It is safe to believe that the 
plague will not spread far. and that, thus early in the game, 
the authorities are right in asserting, with every show of con- 
. that they have "the disease well in hand and under 
control." 



77//; FRENCH VIEW OF STRIKERS. 

They are having trouhle with lahor unions in France. M. 
Clemenceau, the radical leader, and French Minister of the 
Interior, declared in the Chamber recently that a man who 
sought and found employment, although not a member of a 
union, had the right to work without hindrance from his fellow- 
workmen. 

M. Clemenceau makes a distinction between the striker and 
the worker by saying that the striker has a right to strike for 
better wage, but he had no right to force a strike ore men who 
had families to support. " The striker is fighting for a better 
living; the worker is fighting for life itself.". This is a dis- 
tinction that is commended to the consideration of the American 
judiciary; they should ponder on it deeply. 

M. Clemenceau ridiculed socialism, and he stated further 
that it is the man that must be reformed, not the frame-work 
of society. Man, when better, would know what social con- 
ditions to select. 



A WISE AND UPRIGHT JUDGE. 

Judge Carroll Cook has given the right kind of a decision 
in the case of Edward S. Boynton in the matter of the killing 
of Heber C. Tilden. Steps should immediately be taken to 
follow out the lines laid down by the judge, and to ferret out 
who gave them the "lulling" orders and place the blame 
where it really belongs. The city authorities are accused 
of having given orders exceeding all bounds, and it was only 
after the militia and the regulars came in that anything like: 
system in policing came out of the municipal chaos. While 
General Funston has disclaimed, over his own signature, any 
laurels for the excellence of the work by the regulars, the 
public readily gives him the credit for the excellent service 
rendered. It is a well known fact that a State guardsman 
or a regular army private never uses a gun, except according 
to regulations, and the high-handed actions and killings were 
nearly all committed by people masquerading as officers or 
as citizens' police. 



"//.■/' Nil) 

■ n though linn 

American i 
n the world, and it- - not equal 

nationality hai on ii„. » 

18 there has been ■ iteadj improvement \i that 
time the navy was nsm.- black powder, and the sights and othei 
of the equipment were poorh developed, and it «;>. 
conaidi eal to fire one shot in five minutes. Th ■ 

heavy tnrrel guns of the present day have fired three )ho 
and made three hits in one minute. 

In tonnage, batter] power, speed and safety, the Louisiana 
and Connecticut will rank with the best warships afloal 
under any Hag. Thev will embod" all the latesl improvements 

in warship (.instruction, and an- over a thousand Luis heavier 

than our n.-\t largest ships. Four more bal of the 

same class are building— the Kansas. Minnesota, New Hamp- 
shire and Vermont Poised on her rudder alongside the highesl 
skv-scraper in Son Francisco, the Ijouisiana's bow would tower 
400 feel in the air, seventy feel above the Call buil 
In beam these ships are seventy-sis feet, ten inches, the width 
of three ordinary building lots. This huge mass is driven 

through tin- water at a s] 1 of more than eighteen knots 

an hour by engines of 16,500 horse-power. For these nowerful 

engines then- is a normal coal supply of 900 tons, but on.- of 

the factors that will make these new battleships especially effec- 
tive engines of war is that, if necessary, they can carry enough 

coal to steam continuously at half s] 1 for a distance of 5,000 

miles. Xo battleship in any navy has over equaled this record. 
Officially, the Connecticut and Louisiana arc known as sex- 
going battleships, with two 12-inch and four 8-inch turrets. 
For their nrotection and safety the armoring of these vessels is 
unusually heaw and extensive, while their bulkhead arrange- 
ments are such as to insure them against sinking under almost 
any imaginable conditions. 



OAKLAND HARBOR. 

Unusual activity is being manifested all along the Oakland 
water-front, due to the Key Route and its wide improvement 
scheme of deep water frontage facilities, and also to the work 
of the Santa Fe Railroad and Southern Pacific Company. Tt 
is only a question of a short time when a belt railroad will 
have to be constructed to facilitate the handling of Oakland's 
ever-increasing commerce. 

The city of Oakland is contemplating extensive improve- 
ments for the disposition of its sewage by a comprehensive sew- 
erage system and adopting the admirable flusher system of dis- 
charge now in vogue in Alameda. This will employ hundreds 
of men along the water-front in construction of outlets. The 
most serious question arising is the great scarcity of labor, 
and the contemplated railroad and municipal works are thus 
seriously retarded in fruition. 



LIFE IN CHICAGO. 

Not satisfied with the distinction that comes to a com- 
munity by the possession of a Packingtown, Chicago makes 
the claim, through the mouth of State Supreme Judge John 
Gibbons, that it is the Mecca of free love. Said the Judge re- 
cently: "Chicago opens its doors to all mismated members of 
the human family seeking solace in illicit relations. The law 
of divorce here prevailing and enforced practically establishes 
legalized Mormonism." This naturally gives rise to the ques- 
tion: "Are you ma 'vied, or do you live in Chicago?" 



FRANKLIN K. LANE. 

The confirmation of Franklin K. Lane as Interstate Com- 
merce Commissioner by the Senate is gratefully received by 
Californians. Mr. Lane is comparatively a. young man, but 
he has, to use the Gallic phrase, arrived. Regardless of politics. 
all Californians acclaim President Roosevelt's action and the 
Senate's confirmation of the act with pleasure. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jol-s 1 1. L90G 



Tin' renomination of Littlefield from Dingley's old districl 
is not exactly a rebuke to Roosevelt, Inn ii shows that the 
State Hi' Maine indorses Littlefield's opposition to many of 
the Presidents' pel measures, h shews this to be the fact 
because Littlefield's fighl againsl administration influences be- 
came a State as well as an affair local le thai Congressional 
district. The Republicans of Maine have made Dingley their 
patron saini because lie was the author of the existing tariff 
enactment, called the "Dingley tariff," ami it was to have 
been expected thai the President's advocaq of a revision of 

pretty much the whole schedule of duties would he resented 
iii Maine, though opposition to revision was not as vigorous 
as the stand-patters expected, old politicians think they see 
in the Maine squabble considerable danger of a serious division 
in the party's lines in all the States on the tariff questions. 
the more so because Roosevell has hinted pretty broadly thai 

the trusts could not he successfully supervised by national 
authority without a much nearer approach to a tariff for revenue 
only than high protection permits. It is clear just now that 
the question of tariff revision is going to enter largely into the 
coming Congressional campaign, especially in the Middle West, 
where the presenl duties are nol al all popular. 



The strangest thing is, thai the Republicans are becoming 

more confident every day thai they will have Hie majority of 
the Missouri and Arkansas delegations in the Sixtieth Con- 
gress, and have a good chance of carrying the State ticket in 
the last-named State. In the latter. Republican hopes are not 
founded upon any change of political sentiment, hut former 
Governor I >a\ is has been such a merciless hoss for several years 
that the people are prellv sure to resort to the only mean.-. 
they have lo break up the ring, which is to throw the State 
into Republican hands. In the State Convention, the other 
day. Davis presented a platform of his own making, and sub- 
mitted a tickel of bis own selection, and forced the convention 
to accept hull). Loud protests were filed, but the majority of 

the convention were Davis's henchmen, and they accorded the 
minority liltle consideration. There was no open bolt, but 
enough was asserted on the floor and on the streets lo convince 
almost any one thai there is a scheme on foot lo combine with 

the Republicans and eleel their ticket, and thus break Davis's 
hold on the machine. 



"Tom" Taggart's gambling hell at French Lick Springs, 
one of (he most notorious places in the country, together with 
the West Baden Springs gambling resort, was raided to-day," 

went the rounds of all the Hearst newspapers si days ago 

in the shape of a "special" despatch. As everj one knows. 
Tom Taggarl lives in Indiana, ami is chairman of the Demo- 
cratic National Committee. Naturally the affair has stirred 

the Democrats id' Indiana lo a boiling heat of indignation, and 
si't the pet to sizzling all over the country. Tom Taggarl is 
one of the most popular men in his State, where he has the 
hacking of pretty much everybody in things personal. Ili- 
denunciation of Hears! is something frightful lor manufactur- 
ing such a base falseh I and retailing il all over the country. 

Taggarl does nol deny thai he is the principal owner of tli.' 
resorts named. 1 .u t he points lo the fact that they are the 
most aristocratic and fashionable summer resorts in Indiana. 
\nyway. the end us nol yet, for Taggarl enjoys the confidence 
if his party's leaders in ami out of Indiana. The trouble with 
Hearst, so Taggarl says, is he has been read out id' the Demo- 
cratic parly for disloyalty, trickery and too ambitious to rule 
the party lor one having his quantity ami quality id' gray mal- 
lei-. Undoubtedly Hearsl did nol have the correct measure of 
Taggarl, or he would not have printed thai •'special." 



A new political issue i^ expected to ,- e to the front by the 

time of the oexl national conventions, ami ii is imported f 

France. One of the articles of the Radicals' programme is 
"old age pensions," and the idea has taken rool in this country. 



Of course, it will he short-lived ami give way to some other 
equally preposterous theory. Estimates have been made id' 
what the annual charge upon the Government would be. based 

II] the French estimates for France, which is $75,000,000. 

Upon thai basis ii is estimated that fully $125,000,000 would 
he required for the United Slates, and upon a continuously 

upward sliding scale. The issue has already I n attacked by 

some of our political economists on the ground that the system 
would in lime destroy the bahil of our people to economize and 

" lay up something for a rainy day, which would have the effeel 
sooner or later (o cause them lo lose self-respect and force 
of character. It is a socialistic scheme, of course, but the 

leaders do mil care lo stop and consider that there would be 
no occasion for the individual lo he frugal or economical if be 
was sure thai on and after a given age be would be eared for 
lo the Government; that when everybody care- for everybody 
there is on individuality left, and thai without pronounced 
Self-assertive individuality the race would rapidly drift into 

a state -of nlal and physical inactivity. Still, the fad will 

he agitaled. ami for a little while il will appeal to a greater 
number than some suppose. 

* * * 

Nol in the history of the nation did the I pie and the 

politicians begin so early on the Presidential campaign. There 

is more talk and bluster and scheming now than is usually seen 
before the opening of spring of the election year. A few weeks 
ago n was Roosevell ami Bryan without a doubt, but now 

ioiIi are beginning lo he hedged about by adverse criticism. 

Undoubtedly the big corporations are knifing Roosevelt, and 
his favorite candidate, if he finds ii not wise to himself play 

for the nomination, while Folk, of Missouri, and Bailey, of 
Texas, are beginning to intimate thai Bryan is not absolutely 
essentia] lo the salvation of either the country or parly. There is 
no doubt that Bryan's London speech hurt him a lot. Evidently 
imperialism in contradistinction to republicanism impressed him 
deeplv as possessing desirable advantages. He has tried to 
explain it all away, hut this explanation is not up to (he strength 
and force of his usual utterances, and il will be used againsl 
him in the Populist communities. 



Ami now comes the short-haired women of Russia de- 
manding equal rights with men in all things, and the long- 
haired men are al their 1 Is shouting for them. Bui is il not 

living in the lace of the Lord for women lo demand so much 
when lie did nol create them thai way? There is an eternal 
liluess of things as they are. The shuttle can never become 

the loom, nor the I the shuttle, else there would be no fabric. 



Ii was like W'hiielau lead, ambassador to (he court of 

King Edward, and editor "f the New York Tribune, to omit the 

na £ Horace Greeley from the list of the founders of (be 

Republican party; Iml perhaps the great man was left out. 

lest bis name in prini would have revived memories of how 

Creelev was let out :i ii< 1 Ueiil lei into the editorial chair of the 
Tribune. 



f- 



^ 



The Hub 

CHAS. KEILUS & CO. 

Exclusive 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No branch stores — no agents 

We are now located at King Solomon's 

Hall, Fillmore street, near Sutter, where 

the same high standard of excellence of 

smart clothes will be dispensed at our 

usual square and fair prices. We saved 

our stock and new goods are arriving daily 

KING SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, Near Sutter, 

San Francisco. 



*N 



J> 









inLr ..f 

l» a' in 

"' '•'«• thi I been reai In : || 

1 i.. 
mixed np with, for all ..f them km 

about the Chamber that the reason of I 
nerease tl the war at, wind, I - 

rved for nearh ■ fortnight, was the Kaiser's not. 
tl "' ,, " |,; Germany's participation in the fortheon 

pie international conference. As ai unccd in tin- column 

at the time, the Kaiser's conditions of sending a delegation 
!•> The Hague was that all plans for the reduction of armii ■ 
they now are, or any sorl of disarmament, must be eliminated 
from the programme before the session opened, and in no way 
referred to thereafter. This, and semi-official bints tin-own out 
from Berlin court circles to the effeel thai Germany would re- 
n the Morocan controversy in the near future, gavi Prance 

Bufficicnl reason, the Qovcri nl considers, to make haste 

toward complete preparedness for whatever Germany ma} 

a few dinlomatists are of the opinion thai German} 
ing a game of irritation to the end thai France may lose all 
patience, and herself make the declaration of war thai is ex- 
pected Germany will make, the idea being to burden France 
with the responsibility, or apparently so; if the clash comes. 
Anyway, no one supposes thai France would cohsi.Lt for one 
moment a proposition to yield even a fraction of the nation's 
hold on Morocco, without being driven to it on battle-fields. 
There is ample reason to believe .there lore, that the French 
Minister of Finance was fully justified in saying the acute 
Btage had been reached, and serious complications were almost 
inevitable. Tn any event, however, the Anglo-French alliance 
warrants the French Government in going forward with every 
assurance that dear Britain will lie on hand with troops anil 
warships at the right moment. In this connection, it may he 
observed that France is carrying a bigger national debt than 
any other country, anil ->t has plenty of money to loan on good 

security, as witness the $50,000,000 that has' just 1 n placed 

on American railway bonds at three and one-half per cent. No 
one seems to be able to fathom the resources of France. The 
billion dollars that Bismarck exacted at the close of the Franco- 
German war was nearly all raised by the rural districts on the 
nation's bonds. It is estimated that the people of France have 
fully three thousand million dollars invested outside of their 
own country. 

* * * 

The Second Scare. 

The other of the more serious of the war scares would be 
ridiculous and amusing if it, were not for possible complications 
which might set all Europe ablaze. Eoumania and Greece have 
severed their diplomatic relations, and they are shaking their 
fists at one another across two neutral nations that lie between. 
and through the Dardanelles which neither would be allowed 
to pass had either a navy. And what makes the estrangement 
all the more amusing is that the real basis of the falling out 
is largely a controversy over religious faiths. But the danger 
of international complications lies in Macedonia, where the 
Greeks and Vlachs are already conducting a war in the interest 
of their respective countries. Should the Sultan of Turkey 
conclude to take advantage of the disturbing state of affairs 
in Macedonia and tighten his grip on that country, which he is 
pretty sure to do, the powers would have to interfere. Naturally 
England would espouse the cause of Greece, and Italy and 
Russia the cause of Boumania, because of blood lies and political 
interests. Germany would stand aloof and wait for the main 
chance, and France would have no interest other than (o watch 
Berlin. The Sultan, with the Dardanelles to trade oil', would 
lie in a position to strike a good bargain with either (ir -u 






• • • 

I lie third |j I. miiI. imi mi 

I ndoubtedly, I.' | the botti 

laration o nsl Japan to annul thai 

in 'hi' Ports hi li treat) win, Japan the suzcreigntv 

of Korea. Japan has since interpreted " auaerainetv *' to 
full ownership, and ha- occupied Korea with a bod) of I 

-i tins move the Km- oi Korea protests with an an I 

and for liis pan .-.in- prisoner "of the Mikado, 

and to impress Russia with Japan's terrible earnestness in the 
premise-, the Tokio Government ha- diplomatically intimated 
to tin' St. Petersburg Government that am move toward Rus- 
sian interference will b I ilitice 

on the plain- of Maiichuiia. 'I bus i- a nation. Korea, eliminated 

from the family of nations to eed ol Japan. 

* * * 

The Fourth Scare. 

The fourth -care comes from Central Arabia. Fortunately 

or unfortunately, you cannot strike a man anywhere on the 

face of tl arth, seemingly, of which (it-cat Britain does nol 

feel the pain. The Sultan of Turkey is organizing a large force 
io invade Central Persia, with the mowed purpose of helping 

certain tribes to secure Supreme authority, which will he sur- 
rendered to Turkey in due time. Great Britain already has 
a substantial footing in ihal country through the ant i-Sultati 
tribes. England's mere appearance of authority has been mis- 
taken by the Sultan to he a bluff. But now the London Gov- 
ernment notifies the Sultan that his proposed struggle For 
supremacy in Central Arabia is not at all io he between Turkey 
and the people of Central Arabia, but between Turkey and 
Creat Britain. Nevertheless, the Sultan is hurrying on the 
necessary preparations to ship Ins expedition to the scene of 

action. England has promised him to be then ti It 

is pretty generally believed in European state circles that at the 

proper time the Sultan will order his expedition Io " right 
about, march." England's scheme has been from the first, 
which was several years ago. to be the paramount influence 
all over Arabia,, and it is not at all likely that she would let 
the Sultan of Turkey thwart her plans. Still, there is no tell- 
ing what •'understanding" the Sultan may have with the Czar 
in which the Dardanelles play an important part. 



It is not strange that prize-lighting heroes should man- 
age to reach San Francisco on the day the dives are opened. 
However, there is an eternal fitness in the copartnership. 



E. C. HELLER, formerly of Heller 8 
Frank now at 1884 Fillmore Street, near 
Bush under the firm name of 

E. G. HELLER 8 COMPANY, 

Clothiers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900 




Hear&eCrKt-t hOe tfcdevil 'art UXHif 
'Ooe Out wil/phjr tie tjen/.jir, *7t&}m 



There is a nasty row brewing in local British colonial 

circles, and a batch of correspondence by the last mail arrived 
here from people in Australia and New Zealand to their friends 
here — sufferers, more or less, by the recent catastrophe — as 
to the disposition of relief funds sent here by Sympathizers in 
both countries. It is well known that New Zealand alone sent 
over $25,000. Whether or not this money was sent for the 
specific purpose of shipping people back who wished to return 
to Xew Zealand has not been definitely ascertained, but steps 
have already been taken to know if at least a portion of :t 
should not have been devoted to the relict of New Zealand people 
here, who had more immediate need of a loaf of bread than • 
passage home. Some wry strange stories are told in connection 
with the way people from these countries and Canada were 
treated here at a lime when common humanity should have sug- 
gested liberal efforts for their relief, regardless of danger of any 
possible imputation for indiscriminate" charity, or of .imposi- 
tion by persons able to provide for themselves, and this, too, 
at the hands of those entrusted with their relief. Keller would 
it be to fall the victim of rascality, upon occasion, than that 
one deserving person should have' been turned away empty- 
handed or treated harshly at such a distressful period! Bad it 
not been for the friendly aid of American citizens, it might 

have gone hard with many | pie, natives of countries only 

too willing to subscribe for their relief. We leave the truth of 
these stories to be determined during an investigation by a 
commission which, if warranted, will present the facts de- 
veloped before the home Government. The information sought 
is as to the sums of relief money sent here from the colonics, 
and to whom sent, and how it was distributed. 

The case of the unknown woman, afterwards identified 

as a Mrs. Hamilton, picked up unconscious by policeman 
Small at Twenty-second and Kentucky streets, in a living con- 
dition, is a most pitiful one. Small carried her to the Potrero 
Hospital, only to find the hospital closed, and after kick- 
ing in the doors, finding no attendants. Because of (his inat- 
tention to duty on the part of city officials, the woman, who 
is supposed to have taken carbolic acid, will probably die. 
There is no possible excuse for such crass misconduct, and 
the official responsible should not only be discharged, but 
tried for manslaughter in ease of the woman's death. 

My friend, Mr. Andrew Furuseth, claims that all Chinese 

sailors should be discharged from the employ of the Pacific Mail 
Company because " they do not speak English." This state- 
ment is the chef d'oeuvre of an unconscious humorist. In the 
ranks of the union, which he so misfitly represents, there is 
divil a bit of an individual who speaks the" language intelligibly. 
Furuseth pronounces -union"' " jewnion." and in many other 
ways murders the king's English and dislocates grammatical 
construction. 

— —That was a beautiful mix-up in Placer County. A man 
going gunning for an admirer of his wife, killed by mistake 
a man who resembled his intended victim. Seeing his em- 
barrassing blunder, he still pursues the real villain, but the 
latter was too quick and got him first. The man shot by mis- 
take doesn't know ho was avenged, and the man who was lo 
have been shot can marry the woman without the bother 
of her getting a divorce. Beautiful ! 

The plumbers have won at their little hold-up game 

and are now getting $6 a day for helping to rebuild stricken 
San I rancisco. It was announced after the fire that the labor 
unions would discountenance any gouging. Their prices were 
extortionate, anyway. But they are rapidly falling into line 
and doing their best to plunder the public by demanding an 
unjustified increase. 

,, — _T T^w Beale wiU P robab] y b e called upon during 
the Thaw trial for expert testimony on the manner of shootinl 
a man in the back. & 



In the line of moral suasion and with a desire to peace- 
fully impress unionistic ideas on a misguided fellow-workman 
who imagined, foolishly, that he lived in a free country, the 
Furuseth forces gave a Mr. Robert Wood, a marine engineer 
from Mexico, an unmerciful beating last week. The unsophis- 
ticated Mr. Wood admitted to the committee that he (while 
attempting to make a living to which he had no right), had 
assisted in unloading lumber from the s(eam schooner Yosemite. 
Hence the beating and the consequent removal of Mr. Wood 
to the Harbor Hospital. As soon as it was seen that Mr. Wood 
had relapsed into unanswering unconsciousness, the assembled 
crowd decided that the unionistic argument was the most con- 
vincing they had ever beard, and peacefully dispersed to their 
various kennels. 

The assurance and impertinence of (his man Furu- 
seth, of the Sailors' I'liion. are almost beyond comprehension. 
As lime goes on. and bis power grows, bis arrogance increases. 
lie has been making himself a nuisance around the headquar- 
ters of the inspectors of bulls and boilers, demanding that they 
make their decisions to suit his views, and threatening to 
have them removed from office, lie has (he idea that these 
inspectors can prevent a ship leaving port unless its crew 
comes up to the law's requirements, when the truth is that 

their sole function i^ to report the condition of the crew to the 
Collector of (he Port, who is (he one to then take action. But 
Furuseth has convinced bis square-headed followers that he 

knows the law. and (bey will follow him even to the extent of 
doing murder. 

The Bulletin has little to do when it keeps before its 

readers one Edward Graney, prize-fight follower and saloon- 
keeper. Before the fire, Graney was proprietor of thai notorious 
and malodorous dead-fall, known as the Belvedere. No man 

who derives bis living from such a place should receive any but 

adverse newspaper mention. Yet (be Bulletin, writing of him 
in light ami facetious rein, gives the impression that he is a 

person of si ■ consequence in the community. Also, it makes 

him a hero in the eves of bovs who read of him. A " home 

paper." the Bulletin calls itself; It might be acceptable to the 
inmates of a Magdalen home by reminding them of the gay 

times they once had. 

At last the Federal warrant has been issued against 

Carrie Nation for sending obscene literature through the mail-. 
'Ibis warrant was issued because of the publication called "The 

Hatchet." Texas authorities have been authorized to arret 

her on a Federal warrant. It is high time this horrible example 
of the woman temperance advocate militant. Mrs. Carrie 
Nation, be jailed for a permanently indefinite period in order 
to dispose of a persistent national nuisance. 

There is a strong suspicion that the man who he] I 

up tin 1 Yosemite stages is an insurance adjuster out of a job. 



SHREVE ®> 
COMPANY 

HAVE ON SALE 
THEIR USUAL 
COMPLETE STOCK OF 
DIAMOND and COLD 
JEWELRY, WATCHES, 
SILVERWARE, GLASS- 
WARE, ETC., AT 

Post Street and 
Grant Avenue, and 
2429 Jackson Street 
San Francisco 

Prompt and. careful atten- 
tion given to correspondence 









Inn. 
With .;> chilly. 

■ 
■'••mini mi' 
Art thou not I " l t.T iiml wholly nkin 
To my own «iin SOU I uid my own wan 
Ami my own wan nose-tip, tilted 

Thi ler than Bin, 

That I bought for a half|>eiiny 

My long, lithe lily, my languid lily. 

Mi lank, limp lilj-love, how shall I win — 
Woo thee to wink nt me? Silver lily 
How shall 1 vini: to thee, softly or shrilly? 

What shall I weave for thee — what shall 1 spin 
Rondel or rondeau or virelai? 

shall l bun like a bee with my face thrust in 

Thy choice, chaste chalice, or choose me a tin 
Trumpet, or touchingly, .tenderly play 

<)n the weird bird-whistle, sweeter than sin. 
That 1 bought for a half-penny yesterday. 

My languid lily, my lank limp lily, 

My long, lithe lily-love, men may grin — 

Say that I'm soft and supremely silly — 
What care I while you whisper stilly? 

What care I while you smile? Not a pin! 
While you smile, while you whisper — Tis sweet to decay. 

I have watered with chloridine, tears of chagrin, 

The church-yard mold I have planted thee in, 
Upside down in an intense way. 

In a rough red flower-pot, sweeter than sin, 
That I bought for a halfpenny yesterday. 

— Anon. 



THE GRAND JURY AND WELCHERS. 

The action of the Grand Jury in taking steps to bring the in- 
surance companies to hook is justified bv the actions of the 
welching companies. Foreman John E. Brannan is quoted 
as follows : 

"Certain members of the Grand Jury have been investigating 
the insurance situation for some weeks, and according to re- 
ports I have received, I believe we will have . evidence enough 
in a short time to present to the Grand Jury with a recom- 
mendation that drastic action be taken. 

" If these welching insurance companies think that the Grand 
Jury is not keeping an eye on them they are in error. When 
the proper time comes, we will divulge the names of the men 
we now suspect, no matter what their position." 

This is a step in the right direction, and may result in 
making some of the companies nay up. It may also establish 
proof on which the President will apply the fraud order 
against welching companies, via the Postmaster-General's 
office. 



It is hard luck if a man loses his gift of prophecy just 

when he needs it most. Here is John Houghton, who gets 
a three days' start on the fire in San Francisco, because he 
knew things were going to happen, unable to foretell his inabil- 
ity to sleep out of doors and live without food. The Alameda 
Board of Health sent him to join the other misfit prophets in 
the county infirmary. 



The most unfortunate thing that lias happened to Gov- 
ernor Pardee is not the attack of correspondent Palmer in "Col- 
lier's," but the support of Hearst by the " Examiner." The 
volunteer service in behalf of Pardee by the "organ of filth " 
should be put a stop to by injunction. Pardee is a respectable 
citizen, and entitled to the sympathies of the entire State in 
his latest affliction. 



>>\KI.\\l> I 



ii (it 1 in ; 

-at up nights dreaming of lln 

tllC pi II III hole. 

1 lorky w hen he 
wiih a left-handed wire, while the right-handed oni 
the children on the far Russian »tcp|Mn. and wondered 

the result would U- when llie Gaekwar paraded down I 

the full quota of helpn t- allowed him by the ethics 

oda trooping ai his beets.. What if the help-meets should 

wear the famous peek-A-boo waist of the Orient! 

Many dreams of lie- hold-over Contingent remain dreams, ami 

no amount of Oriental inn convert them into reali- 

ties. Tin- Prince of India left the glories of the Durhar be- 
hind him. lie dropped off tin- Stockton train looking like 

an effigy of the Queen of Sheba ; h I col- 

lections of jewels were represented by one diamond on I: 
ger ihat could I"- picked up at Tiffany's for two hundred 

dollars any Monday morning. And. "I. alia Rliook " 

-the Maharinal If Thomas Moore had taken for a model this 
solitary expression of the eternal feminine as she is found 
in the East, that a ipanied the Gaekwar, it is safe to say 

the highest priced poem of its time WOUld never have seen the 
lighl of day. 

To add insult to injury, the (biekwar appeared to ha\. 
born with a knife and fork in his disposition: he ale like an 

Englishman. He made onlj conventional use of his fingers 
at dinner; nor were the bones picked up from under the table 
by (he servants and kept as souvenirs. He refused bo squat 

bow-legged for the onlookers. His hooka, if he has one, was 
supplanted by the ordinary cigarette of commerce. 

Altogether the prince was a social disaster in the city over 
the bay. Those who had stayed over to see him, yawned through 
a lew extra games of bridge while waiting for their trains to 
take them to the springs. 



AN IMPERIAL INNOVATION. 

Mr. E. S. DeWolfe, for a number of years the able manager 
of the Hotel Plcasanton, and who has been absent for one 
year, returned since the fire, and has acquired " Haddon 
Hall," changing its name to the Hotel Imperial. This is an 
excellent location in Eddy street, at No. 951, only one block 
from Van Ness avenue, and with direct electric car connection 
with the ferries. It is fitted out with baths and steam heat, 
and patrons are extended splendid courtesy. The house has 
been refurnished throughout. Mr. De Wolfe is one of the 
leading hotel men of San Francisco. 




lal&iuin 

Piano 



To the changing moods and measures which make up the musi- 
cal life, the Baldwin Piano brings a tone of rare distinction. Power 
is there, profound feeling— and refinement. 

We invite you to call at. our new Display and Sales room 

DM nil nilflM P Oil 2512-14 Sacramento Street., 

. H. DALUWin 06 UU., Near Fillmore San Francisco 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTKli. 



July 14, 1906 



UBI^igteTABLE 




Owen Wister's Latest. 

Lady Baltimore is a delicate cameo. 
Those who remember its serial publica- 
tion will rejoice t" see ii in book form. 
"1'is a whimsical, sympathetic Southern 
story, told in charming style. There is 
a sense of hut lor and a delicate touch 
thai make this story an exquisite pic- 
ture. 

It is a true picture. Every Southern 
heart will leap, and there are many in 
California, and exultingly tell the world 
that here is an artist, a true limner of 
the Southern life. They, of the South. 
will pay a willing tribute to the eliann of 
its style, ami to "the perfection of the 
art with which it is told." It is haul to 
imagine the author of thi' "Virginian" 
writing such a story. We have heir 
hero who is surrounded by a bevy of de- 
lightful women, young ami old. and play- 
ing his part with unaffected skill in tin 
high comedy of the hook. It is rather 
more than comedy, for it gives one an 
idea of the blood surge of human kind- 
ness thai flows through the Southron's 
heari — the apparent bond of human 
brotherhood — and as the editor of .1 
Southern newspaper has put it. it is "a 
messenger of conciliation as well as a de- 
lightful story." The Maemillan Com- 
I any. New York. 

//' )'niilli bfli Knar. 

This is the hook you read over and 
over again, tin' ln.uk that lives. Your 
first experience was as ii appeared as a 

serial, and you fretted and fretted until 
vou had the last instal Imeiil before you. 
Now you have it in hunk form, and you 
air surprised because you lost so much 
on the installment plan. The News Let- 
ter had an occasion to give this re- 
markable novel a fore-notice, and it is 

with pleasure (hat the story of the old 
musician and the two young lovers is 
again brought to the notice of the read- 
ing public. "If Youth Hut Knew" is 
our oi' the modern stories that will live. 

Among its many actors is an old. wan- 
dering musician, a man with a deeply 
tragic past, a mysterious, almost fantas- 
tic figure, caustic yet invariably benevo- 
lent, who roams the world, unable In rest 
long anywhere. One sunset hour up in 
the mountains his path crosses that of a 
young man whose essential qualities oi 
heart and manliness he quickly detects. 
Finding the young man strangely blind 
to the glory of his years, lie undertakes 
to teach this youth to In- yoygigj to real- 
ize the delicacy of the spring of man's 
age: to taste the Eragrance of adventure; 
to hoar the music of young love: to know, 
in short, the beauty of ihi s world before 

its colors begin to fade in the eyes of 
age. 

The Maemillan Company. New York. 



Paul Elder & Co. announce the imme- 
diate publication of a work on 'he San 



PrancisCO disaster, by Charles Keeler. 
.Mr. Keeler writes from the standpoint of 
a participant in the scenes he describes, 

as he came to the stricken city from his 
home in near-by Berkeley the morning of 
the earthquake, to take active part in the 
relief work, and stayed through all the 
days of the conflagration and first re-or- 
ganization. 

* * * 

Will Irwin's story of old San Franeism 
which appeared in the Sun three days 
after the earthquake, has been revised 
and will soon he issued in hook form, as 
"The City that Was." by B. W. Huebsch. 
'I he motto of the I k is that proud say- 
ing of Willie Britl. our own inimitable 
little lough: "I'd rather he a busted 
lamp-post on Battery street, San Fran- 
cisco, than the Waldorf-Astoria." Mr. 
Irwin, it is said, is to he managing edi- 
tor of McClure's Magazine. 



EFFECT OF DISASTER 

IX ENGLAND. 

An English correspondent sends souir 

interesting information and comment 
concerning the effect of the San Fran- 
cisco calamity upon the London slock 
market. " The common stocks of the 
eighteen American railways dealt in in 
London showed an aggregate depreciation 
of nearly $75,000,000 in two days. Now 
of these only two companies can possihlv 
have suffered direct loss from the earth- 
quake and the lire — the Atchison and the 

Sniulirrn Pacific. Nevertheless, Union 

Pacific shares fell from 163 to L.'ih,. 
and Atchison from 91 to 92. The rally 
from the bottom was as rapid as the full 
had been, for it was quickly recognized 
thai the scare had been over-done. Bui 
the ical fear was that the unexpected call 
for large quantities of gold for dispatch 

to California would so aggravate the 

monetary stringency in New York as to 
involve hea\\ liquidation of slocks. It 
is now seen thai the rebuilding of San 
Francisco will add enormously to the 
revenue of the western railroads, and put 
millions of dollars into the coffers of the 
Steel Trust. 



AN IMPORTANT MATTER. 

Tt is an important matter to know that 
yon can find the same exquisite service 
and the same conking and baking al 
" Swain's" as before the earthquake. The 
location a< Mil Post street is convenient 

to the new shopping district, and is sure 
to command the patronage of San Fran- 
cisco's gentle ladies. 



The Accident Cabinet Company, 

Kalamazoo, Michigan, is placing mi the 
market a small Sick and Accident Cabinet 
suitable for travelers, autoists, etc. Tt 
contains '.'-I articles most likely to he 

nee led in case of sickness or accident. 

Price of same is only $1.50, less than 
the retail value of the contents. They also 
manufacture larger sizes for use in fac- 
tories, shn|is. etc. 



THE FLETCHER MUSIG METHOD 

Simplex and Kindergarten 

TAUGHT AT 

THE FLETCHER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
2251 Clinton Ave. Phone Alameda 1264 

ALAMEDA 

This system places the study of music on a truly psycho- 
logical and educational basis; hence the drudgery is elimin- 
ated, and the pupils develop naturally and artistically, 
learning to express themselves, not merely to be copyists. 

The Fletcher Music Method has completely revolution- 
ized the old systems of teaching music to children. 

Residence 225 1 Clinton Avenue 
Alameda* Cal. 



La Grande Laundry 

Of San Frai 



is now located at 
234 1 2th St . , San Francisco, Cal. 



EAT 



Moraghan's Oyster House 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

Now open at 1212 Golden Gate Avenue. 

You know our oysters. Wholesale and 

retail. 
A messenger always in attendance for immediate 
delivery of Oysters in bottles, Oyster Cocktails. 
Oyster, Chicken or Squab Loaves. 
6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 



Dr. Geo. J. Bucknall 



Office and Residence 



1121 Laguna St. 



San Francisco 



Emmons Draying and 

Safe Moving Company 

Wreckers, General Contractors 



318 Market Street 

San Francisco 



also 



1060 Broadway 

Oakland 



The most complete outfit in San Francijco 

WESTINGHOUSE 
Electric Manufacturing company 

Westinghouse Air and Traction Brake Co. 

San Francisco office: 1843 Fillmore Street 

Oakland office: 1115 Broadway 

Phone Oakland 7482. W. W. Briggs, Mgr. 

Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 



SUPPLIES 
MOTORS 



DYNAMOS 
REPAIRS 



— Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Win o 
ing syrup for your children while teethin , 



Century Electric Construction Co. 
18 Fell St,., near Market. San Francisco 









& 









llfully applied, 
. mill 



ciiDono of cool, shimmer- 
•■rrnttc flight all 
ii|> mul down it : her bloc obi— liki- mi 
-grown pil with 

and atop o( all was her face, lily- 
fair under the high, satiny black 
fnre; her slanting — ah, Ar: 

helped Nature then — her eyes at once 
luring and childlike, and Uie scarlet line 
that ««.- her month. 

When Raeburn, lately arrived in V - 
kin. came ii> the teahouse under the wis- 
terias, his beauty-loving nature rejoiced, 
and he told her that she was " like rosea 
and gray mist." 

ii Taya San looked pleased, altho 
all she understood was the "oung jester's 
smiling eves: but she poured his tea, and 
clapped her shell-pink palms together for 
more cakes, and, when another frirl shuf- 
fled in, they danced, in movements as 
graceful as roses swaying in the wind. 

Ii was late before Raeburn remem- 
bered that he hadn't Btopped in Tokio 
merely to visit tea houses, and that he 
must get back to Dunn's rooms as fast as 
a "rickshaw and a one-legged coolie would 
take him. 

He was comforted to find that Dunn 
had turned in; it saved the bother of ex- 
planations. Only a sleepy servant re- 
mained in the hall, to be gently prodded 
and kicked into wakefulness. 

There was a late and hurried breakfast 
the next morning, after which Dunn, as 
a good servant of Governmental red tape, 
went to his office, leaving his friend to 
spend the day as lie liked. He was 
pleased to loaf throughout the morning — 
to write a few letters, to scribble some of 
the inevitable postcards, and, late in the 
afternoon, clad in creaseless white, to 
travel via 'rickshaw to a teahouse — a cer- 
tain teahouse with purple curtains of 
wistaria flowing all around it. 

Taya San was there, and tinkled at 
an instrument that seemed a cross be- 
tween a banjo and guitar; Raeburn sat 
himself down with easy grace, in the 
cross-legged manner of his vis-a-vis; they 
laughed together over her quaint efforts 
to talk English, and the task of teaching- 
was so pleasant that when Taya San 
lifted her thick lashes and said, "You 
come again — some more?" he answered, 
"Certainly," quite as if he were in Tokio 
only for the pleasure of talking to pretty 
teahouse girls. 

" She's beautiful," he confided to Dunn 
a few days later, after that lean-jawed, 
cynical person had been jeering at him 
for " going daffy over a mere teahouse 
girl, kept there for such chumps as you." 

"My dear boy," replied Dunn, lan- 
guidly interested, "they're all beautiful 
— in Tokio — hut vnu're bound for Yo- 
kohama on serious business matters, and 
then home ; and let me tell you, if you've 
a sweetheart at home you'd better let 
this little what's-her-name " 



- 

- 

Racbun him, 

Hut's 

-'>. Dunn: I never hear) 

and I'll in. i begin with this little 

• r." 

Hi- companion laughed- a laugh if 

unbelief— but he told bis irate friend t i 

calm down, and wheedled him into going 

fur a rule 

■• . Dunn knew his Tokio well; like- 
his Yokohama. Perhaps that is 
whj he mad.- ii a iNiint of trotting Rae- 
burn around to the nicest people be knew. 

and giving him a chance to meet 
of friendly English girls. 

Urn the boy was blind to whatever 
charm they possessed — blind to the mem- 
ory of a girl at I ie. who saw no other 

face than bis. His eves were only for i 
little figure in a gray kimono — for a 
with welcoming eyes, with red tips pout- 
ing i bildishly for his kisses. 

So he Forgot, and continued not to re- 
member, in spiie nf Dunn's occasional 
protests and the smiling faces of those 
nice English girls. 

The teahouse under the wistarias knew 
him for a frequent guest; Taya San 
blossomed like some wondrous flower in 
a new kimono of blue, with glints of sil- 
ver- woven through it; she danced, she 
sang to him the songs of Nippon, and 
he taught her — for she was a willing pu- 
pil — much of his speech. 

There had been other Englishmen, but 
none like him ; when he came, straight 
and tall, fair, blue-eyed, with bright hair 
curling from his forehead, with his six 
feet of immaculate white-drill, his gleam- 
ing smile, who could resist him? 

Certainly Taya San could not. 

Raeburn's luggage was piled in the 
hall ; his steamer was due to leave the 
next day, and he was solacing himself 
with cigarettes. 

" You can't take her along with you, 
you know," was Dunn's silence-breaking 
remark. 

" Who ?" 

" Your pagan friend, Taya San — 
who else? Don't you know," Continued 
the informing one, " that the girl is a 
slave, owned, body and soul, by the grin- 
ning old devil who owns that teahouse 
and others like it? Don't you know that 
you" would have to buy her, just as you 
would buy horses at home?" 

" Don't ; I can't stand it." Kaeburn 
jumped up, pushing his chair away nois- 
ily. " Pagan or not, slave or not, she's 
a dear little girl, and I'm done up at the 
thought of leaving." 

" What about her ?" came the pitiless 
query. 

For answer, Raeburn said thinss which 
would have to be represented on this 
page by . dashes, and flung himself out ; 
Dunn heard him in the street whistling 
for his 'rickshaw. 

" The boy's a fool," he mused, " but he 
has ~ot a lifetime to learn in." 

A curtain of purple blooms lifting to 
the breeze; in a teahouse, two that 



uhirlni" luh k to 

The ship 
all cruelly alike, followed it. 
coolies dashed up i., the 
and oilier men m white Buitt 
little tables : but life was not tl ■ 

rase ui rouge skillfnllv applied, 
little geisha's cheeks were rosy; and be- 
cause of paint her lips were very, 
red. like threads "i crimson silk ; her graj 
kinmnii shimmered like a silken mist, and 

■ in crazy flight trailed all across it, 
but il yea of Taya San wen- closed, 

die did not answer when they called 

her name. 

As for Raeburn ! But Raeburn would 
never know. — D. A., in Illustrated Bits. 



POPULAR AND GROWING. 

Santa Cruz, because of the enterp 
of ils citizens, is growing with wonderful 
strides, and to no one man is more praise 
due than to Fred W. Swanton. His en- 
ergy and personal courage and continual 
booming Eor Santa Cruz has infused a 
wonderful spirit of enthusiasm in the 
entire population. 



HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 




this trade -mark 
represents the 
highest standard 
of excellence, the 
American gentle- 
man's WHISKEY. 



CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CO. 
ban Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1906 




Attention lsj 

Gambling Insurance now centered! 

Fakers. upon the op-| 

erations of :J 
number of schemers in Chicago, and La] 
iis vicinity, who are now engaged float- 
ing a lot of new insurance companies,' 
with the intention, it is believed, of ^ 
stepping into the business of defunct 
concerns which have defaulted in their 
payments of losses by the recent fire, and 
fled the Slate. If some of the rascals 
are caught in their trickery, jail will Ij3 
the proper place for them. They have 
found San Francisco a paying field for 
the confidence game they have been en- 
gaged in, and they doubtless dislike very 
much being driven out. Some people mav 
call it business to carry $160,000,000 of 
insurance on their books, with total as- 
sets aggregating a little over $2,000,000, 
including everything, as at least one of 
the concerns did, according to its own 
figures when it came to a show-down. 
Others, again, have another name for it. 
which is the more correct, and that is ob- 
taining money under false pretenses. Be- 
fore all is over, it begins to look very 
much as though the criminal courts will 
have their work cut out for them. 



Some of the Lame Ones. 

The Hamburg-Bremen advances a 
queer excuse for non-payment of losses. 
The allegation is made, according to 
attorney Walter P. Johnson, that "while 
ihc company had plenty of assets to pay 
all its losses in full, yet the fact that 
the earthquake deprived the city of watei' 
is sufficient reason to delay or not pa) 
losses; that it was a condition not con- 
templated in the fixing of premiums, 
etc. The general rule in all settle- 
ments in the past had been about 70 
per cent, and it was preposterous in i 
case of total loss to expect more than 
this." This is the way one of the lame 
company's agents explains the action of 
his company. Here is a clear case Eor 
the placing of the fraud order against 
the company that offends in (his way. 

* * * 
A Wealthy Welcher. 

Herr Witt, who has come to this city 
as a representative of the Austrian-Phe- 
nix, says that the European companies 
are sadly misinformed as to the exteni 
and total loss in San Francisco. All the 
comfort he advances to policy-holders is. 
that "he hopes the company will pay.'' 
There is, because of this, a great amount 
of anxiety and much talk of organization 
to compel action bv this foreign corpora- 
tion. There is no earthquake clause in 
this poliev, and the company is fully able 
to pay,and yet it is reported as not hav- 
ing made even an offer of settlement or 
any attempt to adjust a single loss. In 
justice to Mr. Witt, it must be stated thai 
he is of the opinion that the courts of 



Ibis count i will recognize any judgment 

Igiven here against foreign corporations. 
• * * 

They have Incorporated. 

Policv-holders in the North Genua i 
Insurance Companv have organized and 
incorporated to light the company in the 
courts and compel payment. The direc- 
tors are William J. Herrin, Martin A 
Maher, Louis Bartlett, Edmund 
Tauszky, C. H. Garoutte, Edward J. 

jTalbott ami John Reher. 
. . . 

MWilliamsburg's Court Populanhi. 

|$ J. R. Talcott is another claimant 
against the Williamsburg City Fire In- 
surance Company in the sum of $6,000 
for the loss on a 11111111111"- at 732 Sac- 
laiiiciito street. 



THE DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR 
ROLL OF HONOR. 

Aetna. 

American Central. 

American of Newark. 

Atlas of London. 

California Insurance Company. 

Citizens of St. Louis. 

Connecticut. 

Continental. 

English-American Underwriters. 

Hart lord. 

Home of New York. 

Insurance Company of North 

America. 
Kings County. 

Liverpool and London and Globe 
London and Lancashire. 
London Assurance Company. 
Manchester. 

Mercantile of Boston. 

Michigan. 

Mew Hampshire. 

New York Underwriters. 

New Zealand. 

Niagara Insurance Company. 

Northern Assurance of London. 

North British and Mercantile. 

I Irienl of Hartford. 

Pelican of New York. 

Phoenix of London. 

Queen 

Royal of Liverpool. 

St. Paul. 

Springfield. 

Slate of Liverpool. 

Sun of London. 

Teutonia. 

There are thirty-five of these 
companies. 



The Right Stand. 

The Supervisors of Nevada County 
me taking the riffht stand. Thcv have 
decided to cancel all " six-bit " com- 
panies' -olicies and place all business 
with companies paving claims in full in 
San Francisco. The county carries 
business in sixteen companies, and of 
these, six were found to be "six-hit' 
companies. Nevada City and Grass Val- 
ley will also take steps to look up poli- 
cies on public buildings, schools, etc.. 
and thus ascertain how many policies are 
carried in welching concerns. that 
changes may be made. 



An Incontestable Policy. 

A life insurance policy contained a 
stipulation to the effect that " after two 
years from its date this policy will be in- 
contestable provided the premiums are 
duly paid and the requirements of the 
company as to age and military or naval 
service in time of war are observed." The 
Kentucky Court of Appeals held, in the 
ease of the Kansas Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company et al. vs. Whitehead, that 
this stipulation embraced all defenses 
that could be made to its payment at the 
death of the insured except those specifi- 
cally excluded by its language, and that 
such a stipulation was not void as con- 
travening public policy. The court fur- 
ther held that where an insolvent- insur- 
ance companv, b" its receiver, turned 
over all its assets to another company 
upon agreement with the latter company 
lo reinsure all policies in good standing 
therein, and actuaries were appointed to 
ascertain and report all the policies then 
in good standing, such policies only of the 
insolvent company as were included in 
the schedule reported by the actuaries "as 
in good standing" were embraced in the 
agreement for which the contracting com- 
pany was liable. 

* * * 

They Will Sue. 

W. W. Montague & Co. will sue the 
Williamsburgh City Fire Insurance Com- 
pany for $7,000 on account of loss of 
stock during the fire. It has been re- 
fused payment by this Hamburg corpora- 
lion. which it is reported alleges non-lia- 
bility under the earthquake 'clause exist- 
ing in its policies, and the proofs of loss 
have been returned. W. W. Montague 
& Co. have already collected policies writ- 
ten by other companies, and they are de- 
termined to make the Williamsburgh City 
pay up if the law will support their con- 
tention. Attorney Walter II. Linforth 
will bring the suits for Montague & Co. 
■ The earthquake may have started the 
first fins." said Linforth, recently, "but 
so many other causes entered in that the 
earthquake feature became insignificant. 
I believe that the courts will compel the 
Williamsburgh City to pay all losses 
where the insured building stood after 
the earthquake, but was destroyed later 
bv the lire. This applies also to stocks 

of goods in these buildings." 

* * * 
The Policy of Delay. 

The policy of delaying adjustments 
and payments still obtains with many of 
[he companies doing business in San 
Francisco. As outlined in the New 
Letter hist week, the Scottish-Union and 
National Insurance Company has not 
changed its general method of " laisse/. 

allcz " in any way to benefit the holder of 

a policy. The tip-toeing, mysterious de- 
lav, the technical questioning, the thenr; 
of depreciation, and any old excuse to 
put oil' the ultimate payment and to 
secure an offer, because of the neces- 
sitous condition of the insured, at a ilis- 
eoiinl from the face value of the contract. 

is the goal to be reached by the ageni ] 









ll 



Takir: . 



deplorable 



- 

8 

ace that will amply protect the 

any I uld |>,. 

from the S 
company refusing to comply to its 
provisions. This p 

worded that any child niiirlit understand 

mpany 
should be allowed to inter thi 8 
business except under these conditions. 
Any company ii"t complying would then 
red an outlaw, and ibis would 
protect the complying companies from 
shark outside companies, and would pre- 
vent the placing of insurance with East- 
. rn companies by the largesj of our retail 
busim rtain of these ] 

have always bought their insurance 
where they bought everything else — in 
the East To-day they stand face to face 
with a possibility of an immense loi 

n of the fact that the New Tork 
■ companies seem to 
think they cannot be compelled to pay- 
up. 

• • • 

Liberal ami Quick. 

It is now about ninety days since the 
fire and insurance comnanies, which have 
ample funds, are coming to the front 
with their loss payments. Among these 
arc the German-American and German 
Alliance of New York, whose losses are 
being settled by one corps of adjusters, 
and which have paid to date $1,300,000 ; 
the Phoenix of Hartford has paid about 
$1,000,000, and the New Hampshire 
about $180,000. It is one thing to vote 
for payment of losses " dollar for dollar,'" 
but their actual and prompt payment tells 
the story. This group of companies will 
pay in all over $5,000,000, and witli 
eighteen or more adjusters busily en- 
gaged, they hope to be among the first 
to report all San Francisco claims settled. 
Their adjustments have been universally 

commended as liberal and fair. 

• • « 

The Fraud Order. 

A number of policy-holders, in welch- 
ing foreign companies, have taken steps 
to bring the matter before the Postmas- 
ter-General, with a view to utterly nre- 
venting these companies transacting busi- 
ness in any State or territory in the 
United States. The allegation is made 
that payment of premiums has been regu- 
larly made f.r years, and that the com- 
panies now hedge behind the earthquake 
clause, and refuse to make any kind jf 
payment at all. This is working insur- 
ance on the same basis as the get-rich- 
quick concerns, in the mining line, so 
quickly and effectually squelched 

through the fraud order. 

* * * 

" Now You See It, Now You Don't." 

The deadly parallel is being drawn on 
the German Insurance Company of Free- 
port, Illinois. The representative in 



if tin 
than 

Orleai 

• • • 

Klirimnr i M i 

the I - I 

aoains liamsburg In- 

surance Company. 

' » • » 

H. M. I I I »' Kan el! 

suing for \ n on his building. 

•■allied at $110,00 

raits aroinsl the Williamsbui i 
led tan- bo become at as the leaves 

in Vallambrosia. 

• • • 

Sava ed an assessmenl of L0 

cents. Work is now being actively car- 
ried on in ibis mine, and the report Bled 
last week shows that on the Stttro tunnel 
level the main drifl from the smith lat- 
eral has been pul in good repair foi B 
total distance of :;.".; 

* * * 

The North Shore Railroad Company 
; i i- levied an assessment of $10 pec share. 

* * * 

The Rhine ami Moselle Insurance 

Company is another one of the big and 
wealthy companies, amply able to pay up 
its debts, which claims inimunitv from 
responsibilitv. for some mysterious rea- 
son. 

* * * 

The German Government is to be 
asked to take action as to these com- 
panies, and official Germany is already 
a'-og as to what the Kaiser and his Gov- 
ernment are goin"- to do about the wel- 
chers. The Kaiser, it is said, is indig- 
nant that any German company should 
act in this indefensible manner, and as 
he is a man who, apart from anv other 
characteristic or foible, is plainly honest, 



mid 

un to i: 



IFFAIHS. 

mil ii) ll,. 

of interest on 

bonds, the property of il 

ash in Company becomes liabl 

for the period of sut months, 
holders hai ing thai time in which to 

»p. ll is to be hoped that it will not, 
and that foreclosure proc lings will re- 
sult, which «ill clear up the whole buai- 
the company to • 

afresh, free from the burden of debt In 
all. the company now owes in the n 

borhood of $4, .■>■"! including the bond 

issue, and an over-drafi od $1,500,000, 

to .1. D. Sp Bros., who are the 

holders of the bond issue. The 

outlook certainly does not look very 

eh ering For any small share-holder who 
mav have paid up on (he la 
ment. 



Among the many guests at Del Monte 
arriving last week were Mrs. George 
Gibbs and Miss H. E. Gibbs, of Sail 
Francisco; Elmer Be Camp of Los An- 
geles; Mr. T. D. and V. P. Wood of 
Santa Barbara ; A. Don Hines of Sacra- 
mento; Mrs. Mark llequa of Oakland; F. 
Omori, the celebrated Japanese scientist, 
and Graf von Sternberg, Secretary of 
State for Germany, and suit, including 
Major D. von Unhtrite. 



The Pot Boast Cafe and Grill is 

now open at 917 Market street, opposite 
Mason street. This makes one of the 
most convenient places down-town for 
the business man, as the location is con- 
venient to more than one business cen- 
ter. 



STATEMENT 

of trie 

Fireman's Fund Insurance 
Corporation 

OAKLAND, June 28,1906. 

This new corporation was organized on May 16, 1906, with a capital stock of $1,000,- 
000, divided into 10,000 shares of $100 each, and in addition thereto a net surplus of $1,000,- 
000, payable in quarterly installments of $500,000 each. Nearly $400,000 has already been 
paid in in cash. Succeeding quarterly payments fall due September 20 and December 20, 
1906, and March 20, 1907. 

The corporation was licensed to do an insurance business by the California Insurance 
Commissioner on May 19, 1906. 

IS HAS NO LIABILITIES IN THE DESTROYED DISTRICT OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, AND IS NOT AFFECTED BY THAT CALAMITY. 

This new Corporation, even at this time, is financially stronger than most insurance 
companies operating on the Pacific Coast. 

It has assumed the outstanding, unburned liability of the old Fireman's Fund Insur- 
ance Company, for which service it has received adequate payment. This compensation, 
together with the cash paid in by the stockholders of the new Corporation brings its present 
cash assets up to nearly $3,000,000, all of which is available for meeting its liabilities under 
policies, contracts or guarantees. 

The guarantee of the new Corporation will be endorsed on all policies of the old Fire- 
man's Fund Insurance Company not involved in any loss, if the policy-holders will present 
their policies to the agents of the old Fireman's Fund. 

W. J. DUTTON, President. 






12 



SAN FRANCIS v NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 190G 




FINANCIAL^ 




A question which 
Minimis on Tap we would like some 
for Nothing. of the grea'1 author- 
ities on mine valua- 
tion to answer is this: Why should a 
mine selling for $15,000,000 lose $10,- 
000,000 by depreciation within the space 
of a few short hours, if ii ever ap- 
proached the first-named value upon in- 
trinsic value, jus! because two of the 
management talk back to one another. 
Tonopah Extension is posed before the 
public .-is a $15,000,000 proposition one 
day; the next il is nuoted ai $4,500,000, a 
depreciation of over $10,000,000 when 
McKane & Schawb fall out in Pittsburg. 
In other wo,rds, $10,000,000 of ore in 
sight has been translated into thin air 
in the twinkling of an eye. This is i 
poser For people uninitiated in min ■ 
valuation on the system now in vogui 
when a promoter's tout lakes to figure 
on an ore body, given a surface outcrop 
one foot wide, opening out to 13 inches 
at the bottom of a 30 foot prospect shal I, 

an area open to surmise. 1,500 feet long 

on the surface, with indefinite possibili- 
ties at depth, ranging from the earth's 
center to a vision of dawn some morning 
through a crack in its periphery at the 
Antipodes. If it look twenty-four hour' 
lo knock $10,390,000, io be exact, off 
Tonopah, how long would it take to cut 
\"< w York Tonopah, or some othci 
bonanza stock, in two. should two of its 
directors engage in fisticuffs Now we 
are offered a chance to pick up $15,000,- 

000 at a third of ils value or the] i - 
ithouts while the two men supposed to 
know everything about the underground 
showing in the mine look on as the dea' 
public helps itself to gold bricks for i 
bagatelle. All of which is a very likely 
state of affairs, ami likely lo strengthen 
the confidence of people in mining specit 
la lion. 

Beginning on 

Weighting ilia "Monday hist, nor- 

i fomstoi It Pmrii. mal conditions 

prevailed on 1 1 1 • 

San Francisco Stock ami Bond Exchange 

in the mallei' of daily sessions of th- 
Hoard, and two are held daily, one in the 
morning at 9 :30, and again in the after- 
noon at 2 o'clock. Conditions are still 
a little chaotic in the matter of housing 
the Comstoek companies, but within ,i 
fortnight the new offices in the Exchange 
Building should he completed and all 
comfortably settled. The market has 
been rather dull and weak of late, al- 
though the news from the mines is such 
as lo sustain the confidence of dealers 
in the future of the lode. The sole trou- 
ble "ii tin- -i reel seems to be the act ivitv 
of a certain bear clique workins tooth 
and nail to weaken prices by heavy sales 
of Ophir on a downward scale of prices 
This manipulation is plain enough l> 

1 lie eye of the veriest tyro in the husi- 
ness. For instance, the stock was offered 
in lots to suit on opening call Monday 



al from :','■'■ , to 3.65, and to 3.50 in 
three consecutive offers, followed by 
quick hid of 3.40 for one hundred shares. 
'1 his. of course, is not the work of an 
outsider, hut manipulation pure and 
simple, the object of which is but loo 

apparent. That is the mosi objection- 
able feature of the ( 'onistoek market — a 

dealer is always playing against some in- 
side cabal which bars out operators of the 
very class which should lie the slay and 
sunnorl of the speculative branch of the 
business. Xo man of intelligence is go- 
iii"' to invest monev in a one-sided game. 

and intelligent people do not believe 
street yarns to the effect that bonanzas 

are blocked out al different points along 
the lode, ready to be trotted out al some 

unexpected moment at the will of some 
member of the combination known and 
revered by the old men of the curb as 
" they." The day for that nonsense has 
gone by, and the science of Comstock 

manipulation has lost all mystery to the 
practical man of 1 1 1 1 ~ i m-^s. who has lived 

to learn a few things, until now ho 

is about as wise as the gods themselves. 
It cannot be denied that the (' stock 

lode has proved a wonder in the past, and 
that it has a great future as an ore pro- 
ducing proposition. On this basis, men 
of money will he found readv and willing 
to invest money lor ils development. The 
liroposition to sink to still deeper levels 

than those alread" opened up is not only 

sensible, hut safe lo undertake. The 
movement has been well under way for 

S years oast, and the progress mad" 

hv the long-headed and enviable men wh > 
bine already made the drainage of the 
deep levels a practical success, shows that 

a portion of the C stock management 

knows its duty, and is willing to do it. 
Thev are the men whose hands should 

be strengthened as worthy of full con- 
fidence, i" the exclusion of the thimblit 
and the pea contingent content to run a 
game of "now you see it and now you 
don't " — a one-sided little picayune gam ■ 
of beads 1 win. tails you lose. The peo- 
ple with the welfare of the Comstoci< 
mining interests at heart. while iho, 
recognize ahe suicidal policy of such a 
game, have been handicapped lor years 
hv it. They can see the danger of such 
methods, which sooner or later will clean 
the public off the street. They have done 

and are doing nil in their power to avert 

ibis disaster, bucking against an evil 
which in tin 1 course of years has grown 
so deep-rooted ihat ii can defy all ordi- 
nary efforts for its eradication. It will 
he hoped that the interests devoted lo (lie 
legitimate exploitation of the lode may 
yet devise some method to rid themselves 
of this incubus, which is not only ham- 
pering their efforts, but ruining the pros- 
pects for business on i he -i reet. 

'I'll.' stock and Bond 

I.,,, ,ii sin, lc* Exc] gi opened up 

and Bonds. again after the mid- 
summer vacation. 
Business since then has been I'.-iirlv active 
with price- generally linn. Hawaiian 

Co) creial scored quite an advance. 

and among the other sugar stocks. Pau- 
haii. ( Inomea, Makaweli and Hutchinson 



were higher. Fireman's Fund sold up 
lo $20, and Bank of California at $350, 
ex-dividend. The Telephone stock was 
quoted lower. During the week the 
Board of Supervisors of this city passed 
to print an ordinance granting the Home 
Telephone Company a fifty years' fran- 
chise, to establish a new system in the 
city ami county. 

The market for New 

Dull Market Nevada shares is not 

for Miufs running away, and 

of uierit. the most enthusiastic 

whoopers on the street 

just now arc brokers who seldom descend 

from their airy attitude among the stars. 
when there is a possible commission in 
sight. The difference between the old- 
line broker on Pine street and the up-to- 
date article on Bush street, is that the 

ancient refused lo discuss slocks and 
mines with his client. "He was there.' 
be would remark, "to execute orders, not 
lo act as adviser." His modem proto- 
type waxes enthusiastic over the stock he 
is retained to market, not scrupling to 
-a\ what be thinks about dim Brown's 
wild-eat exhibits. This may he profitable 
lor the moment, hut there is a reflex 
moment in store for the client when the 
promises of the vendor do mil pan out, 
and the stock gradually sacs below tha 
purchasing mice. The dull tone id' Ih ! 
New Nevada list as a whole is disap- 
pointing, lo say the least, ami il is safer 
io the long run to let dealers take their 
own chances. Some of the leading New 
Nevada stocks have certainly done well. 

fulfilling all the pr ises of their wn- 

dors. But there is a large majority, on 
the other hand, which so far have not 
come up to expectations, to put it mildly, 
and they, as usual, influence public opin- 
ion. Failures always cut more of a fig- 
ure in influencing the human mind than 
Successes. The hitler are more rare. 
Many of the mines in the new camps, 
the shares of which should lie strong 
and active in the market on absolute 
merit, are dull and neglected, and til's 
is what gives such a tame view to th" 
situation. Better things were expected 
when the Boards opened up again for 
business, judging from the way the stocks 
held up during the past crisis. They 
may do better before long, hut it is high 



e. 



P. E. BOWLES 



E. W. WILSON 



^ 



AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 



DEPOSIT GROWTH 



Mar. 


3, 


'02 


$ 387,728.70 


Sept 


15 


" 


1,374,983.43 


Mar. 


15. 


'03 


2,232,582.94 


Sept 


15. 


" 


2,629,113.39 


Mar. 


15, 


04 


3,586,912.31 


Sept 


15. 


" 


3,825,471.71 


Mar. 


15, 


'05 


4,349,427.92 


Sept 


15, 


" 


4,938,629.05 


Mar. 


15. 


'06 


5,998,431.52 


June 


18 


" 


6,650,555.88 



^ 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BUILDING 

Francis Cutting, Geo. N. O'Brien 

Vice-President Cashier 



^ 









manimilaf 



HUM 

illli in thii 

(or *till 

only nutu' 

..f flii 

• • • 

Tli. n about tin 

tiremcnl of the P»lil H k and Oil 

md tin' di 
of the money now in the treasury nmong 
il„. mi . nil • would seem to be 

move, but still better it 
win could Ih' found to amalgamate it.~ 
membership with the Sun Fran 
Stork and Bond Exchange. This would 
unite interests which are too much 
l ere d ir the benefit "I tin" brok- 

rhile at the Bamc time it militates 
against th.ir clients. There are alwavs 
petty antagonisms created by the exist- 
ence of opposition exchanges, which are 
not conducive to prosperity in business. 
and any course tending to remove them - 

advisable. 'II il share markel should 

bear a closer relationship to the industry, 
which is now one of the mosl import ml 
in the State, and it musi be admitted thai 
under existing conditions it has uol re- 
ceived the attention it should. 



IIIH I 



l\ 



I 'HEERFTJLLY CORRECTED. 
Tlic News Letter 1ms inadvertently 
•rivi'ii the location of the La Grande 
Laundry as Oakland, and wishes to cor- 
rect the false impression that may have 
pained ground with its readers. The 
La Grande Laundry Company is located 
at 334 Twelfth street, San Francisco, 
with its office and works. 



I 

ulll lie ' 

tlic finam 

hank 
will .> ir the- 

: it will 1 1 n n . - ;i di 
men! for the landing of the trait 

in of tin- rai ions t panies 

; . and still another department will 
be devoted lo legal matters. Mnnagi 




playhouses in the thcatrii 

will he pcrmitl u ) on 

The institution will 
finance theatrical ventures ai various 
points. It will have it- quarters in the 
I heatre. 



Furniture 

Folks tell us the stock here is more complete, the prices lower and the 
delivery better than anywhere else. . . .Folks tell us this is the only store 
in town where the stock is complete and prices no higher than formerly 
.... Folks tell us this new store reminds them of the artistic shop we 
had at the corner of Post and Stockton Streets. . . .Folks tell us the fur- 
niture, carpets, stoves, draperies, bedding, linoleum, etc., etc., are priced 
so low they cannot resist buying. 

LAVENSON-SH1ELEY CO., HAIGHT and WEBSTER STS. 



f 



The many friends anil acquaint- 
ances of Frank Bros., formerly of Heller 
& Frank, Grant avenue and Market 
streets, will he glad to hear that they 
have now opened a store, 1344-1354 Fill- 
more street, near Ellis, with a complete 
line of men's furnishings. Their line of 
i lien's clothes has always been from the 
shops of the host makers, and up-to-date. 

.1 GENTLE HINT. 
Senator Dillingham, of Vermont, tells 
of a quaint character in that State called 
Jolly Jones, the proprietor of a "hotel" 
in Montpelier. Jolly was noted for his 
dry humor and his unfailing power of 
repartee. One morning after breakfast 
a guest was about to depart without pay- 
ing his bill. Jolly Jones walked slowly 
to the door with him, and in the blandesl 
of tones said : " Mister, if you should lose 
your wallet between here and Randolph, 
rememher you didn't take it out here." 

THE OLD MAN'S PLEA. 
Suitor— Mr. Bluffkins, I have come to 
ask for your daughter's hand. Bluffkins— 
Young man, this is a momentous affair to 
you, and I won't conceal the truth. I 
can't support you in the style to which 
you have been accustomed. 



Mount Shasta 

The most beautiful mountain in America— snow 
capped the year around. 



Well worth a long journey simply to 
see it once. But come here and 
live a few days or weeks. Finest 
of trout-streams, finest of camping 
places. Many hotels, resorts and 
mineral springs around its base. 



Get information and make arrangements with 

our agents. 



iS % 



Southern Pacific 



%i 



■j 



14 



SAN PEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1906 



THE WHITE HOUSE 



Opening of their Spacious 



New Stores 

Monday, July 23, 1906 

N. W. Cor. Van Ness Ave. and Pine St*. 

Raphael Weill ®> Co., Inc. 



CARRIED A STING. 

Dr. R. A. Torrey, the evangelist, was 
dining at a Philadelphia house when the 
talk turned to Easter millinery. 

In his ready way Dr. Torry used this 
topic as a peg whereon to hang a little 
lesson. 

" Some People," he said, "can plant a 
sting in the pleasantest remark. Most 
of us only care to wound when we are 
angry, but these folk, the bane of social 
life, are continually inflicting causeless 



"One of these people, a woman, met 
another woman, who is elderly, yester- 
day. 

"'Now, this is pleasant,' said the el- 
derly woman, after a few minutes' chat. 
'You haven't seen me for eleven years, 
and yet you knew me at once. I can't 
have changed so dreadfully, inn I?' 

'"I recognized your bonnet, 5 said (lie 
first woman." — American Spectator. 



GOLD BY THE TON 

FROM THE YUKON. 

Nearly four tons of gold were piled 
up in the assay office at Seattle on June 
6th, the bulk of which had been received 
from the north that day. The arrival of 
this gold did not excite more than a rip- 
ple of interest in the city. There were no 
crowds around to watch its disembark- 
ment. There were no crowds of bearded 
and bronzed miners coming down the 
gang planks of the steamships, each bent 
under the burden of a " poke " full of 
the precious metal. When the golden 
harvest is gleaned in the North, it reaches 
the marts of trade through Seattle, ami 
helps to make it one of the most prosper- 
ous and the most rapidly growing com- 
munities in the world. The Klondike 
of the North is not one single district 
now, but many. 



STRINGENT RULES 

FOR EMPLOYEES. 

In his factories at Buffalo and Detroit, 
Mr. Thomas lias posted this order: 

The newspapers are full of accounts of 
automobile collisions with street cars, 
railroad cars, vehicles and pedestrians. 

All employees are instructed impera- 
tively to slow down with throttle upon 
closely approaching any railway or street 
railway crossing, so that the car can be 
brought to a standstill within a few feet 
in case of danger. 

You are also notified that the law does 
not excuse collisions with vehicles, bicy- 
clists or pedestrians, merely because they 
lie on the wrong side of the road. 

Women, children and many men are 
ignorant of the road rules, hence they 
must be given sufficient consideration to 
avoid injuries to them. 

Driving through (he streets of the city 
at illegal speed is prohibited. 

The above rules are referred to owners 
of vehicles of all kinds, and Mr. Thomas' 
stringent instructions to his help might 
be applied to owners of automobiles all 
over the country, and especially in Cali- 
fornia. 



papers and the people who read them. 
Hitherto the Standard has steadily re- 
fused to talk to the public through the 
newspapers; now it has a man who will 
do nothing else. 

What Mr. Clarke is doinsr for Standard 
Oil dozens of men are doing for other 
corporations throughout the country. 
Much of this " publicitv promoting " is 
of the old- fashioned grape-vine variety, 
irresDonsible, nameless, and probably 
misleading. During the earlier stages 
of the insurance squabble in New York, 
each one of the more important contest- 
ants had his press agent, who worked 
secretly and could not be quoted save as 
"one in a position to know," or as " a man 

in the confidence of Mr. ." City edi- 

tors chafed and swore and reporters strove 
vainly to reach the principals. One man 
was shown in the Hughes innuiry to have 
been in the habit of paying papers liber- 
ally for publishing matter favorable to 
liis employers. — Public Opinion. 



RECOGNIZING THE NEWSPAPERS 
With (lie appointment of Joseph I. C. 
Clarke as " press agent" for the Stand- 
aid Oil Company, many newspaper read- 
ers learn for the first time of the exist- 
enee of a new profession in the corpora- 
tion world, that of promoter of publicity, 
or, to use the common term, press agent. 
Mr. Clarke's appointment is an admission 
by the Standard that it can no longer 
afford to ignore the newspapers and the 
newspaper-reading public. He will bear 
the same relation to the public that a 
lawyer does to a judge and jury. His 
business is to present his client-employer's 
side of the case: to give out statements, 
to receive interviewers; in short, to rep- 
resent Standard Oil before the news- 



Fine Writing. 

William Allen White tells of the pen- 
chant of the editor of a paper in a Ne- 
braska town for high-flown obituaries. 
On one occasion this editor was guilty of 
the following : " This most estimable 
young man, the deceased, first saw the 
light of day on June 16, 1877. He there- 
after left this terrestrial sphere in ample 
lime to celebrate his twenty-fifth birthday 
in the house of his eternal abode beyond 
the arching skies, leaving this earth on 
Saturday, June 15, 1 90S, at 8:10 central 
time." — Spectator. 



Wise — The current magazines have an 
unusual amount of illustrated fiction in 
them. Krankley — That's what! I saw 
a picture in one of them to-day of a Eel- 
low smiling happily while he seraped bis 
face with Somebody & Co.'s safely razor. 

— PhUadelph ia Press. 



11// IT SAX t I //'//. 




View of Mission District, looking down Twenty-first, 




New buildings that are being constructed in the Greater San Francisco rise like mushrooms in one night. 

6 ° . — From June-July Overland Monthly. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1906 




VTDMOBILE 



-O. 



By the Autocrank. 

The automobile department of the 
Secretary of State office has been a paying 
institution as far as it may be considered 
from a political standpoint. It has fur- 
nished work for a number of clerks thai 
were not needed until the adoption of the 
automobile laws. As the moneys received 
from the registration of automobile and 
chauffeurs, including the transfers of 
owners amounting to $18,893, for the 
year ending May 31, 1906, by the laws 
goes fo the support of the automobile de- 
partment, it lias been a paying proposi- 
tion to the State. Besides, some of those 
in the office have been able to pick up 
quite a bit of money on the side, as they 
have been charging business houses in- 
terested in the automobile trade two cents 
a name for daily reports of the registra- 
tion. A number of these lists have been 
supplied to persons in San Francisco, and 
it is presumed that the same has been 
done in other parts of the State, and in 
fact to dealers all through the United 
States. The demand of the dealers has 
been for the names of new owners. The 
list of owners for the year, at the rate 
of two cents a name, would amount to 
$127.96. This means that those who 
are in touch with the department at Sac- 
ramento would not need many subscrib- 
ers to their private business to make an 
income (bat would make the salary in 
the department a secondary considera- 
tion. 

One hundred and fifty lists would 
mean a duplication of the amount paid 
bv the automobile owners, not counting 
such list of the chauffeurs that might be 
supplied. One hundred and fifty lists 
is a small estimate, considering the num- 
ber of people in the trade who are hunting 
business. The competition in the auto- 
mobile trade is as keen as it was in the 
bicycle trade in former days. In fact, 
many of the old bicycle handlers are now 
handling automobiles. They have car- 
ried the hustling tactics into the trade 
of the modern vehicle, and it can be seen 
from this that a list like that which can 
be furnished daily from Sacramento 
would be very valuable. Taking every- 
thing into consideration, the automobile 
department has been a paying institu- 
tion at the Capital. 

* * ^ 

Tacoma, although practically just be- 
ginning the automobile game, is doing 
splendid work. Already the club of that 
city is putting up road-signs, and 
strangers motoring around in the vicinity 
of Tacoma report that these signs have 
been a great help to them in their trav- 
els. Some time ago there was a move- 
ment among the local automobilists to 
put up some of these signs, but the 
earthquake and fire evidently put a stop 
to the scheme. 

This should be one of the propositions 
to be considered hv the Automobile flub 
of California at its annual meeting. A 



special committee should be appointed to 
do this work. The signs can be ob- 
tained in the East free ; the club will 
have only to pay the freight. The trade 
representative members of the club 
should be on this committee. They, 
through their agents throughout the 
State^ could more quickly report how 
many anil of what nature of signs would 
be needed. Then, again, these agents 
could see that they were placed in the 

right places, and when once up could 
watch them, so they were not destroyed. 
It would be a good pronosition at the 
ne\t meeting of the Legislature to pass 
a law protecting these signs, for they are 
nut onl'- of assistance to the automobilist 
but to every one who uses the highways. 
This would be in keeping to a certain 
extent with the movement started in 
Washington by Representative Rhodes of 
Missouri, lie has introduced a bill "n 
Congress that seeks to establish a na- 
tional commission of public highways. 
The object is to work out with the sev- 
eral States and territories the plan oi 

bettering the highways and to bring al 

a uniform system of construction 
throughout the United states. The com- 
mission is to consist el' three members, 
one of whom is to lie appointed by the 

President of the United States, and who 
must have practical knowledge of road 
engineering and construction. This mem- 
ber of the commission is to draw down 
a salary of five thousand a year. The 
other two members of the commission 
are to be the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the Postmaster-General. The latter 
is to be the president of the commission, 
while the civilian member is to be the 
secretary. 

The bill provides that the legally con- 
stituted authorities of the States and 
territories, under whose jurisdiction are 

placed the public roads, on having ex- 
pended a certain sum of money before 
(lie first day of January. 1907, in es- 
tablishing and improving public roads. 
shall file with the auditor of the Stale i 
true statement of all money so expended. 
W ben any State or territory shall make 
application to the commission for na- 
tional aid for the construction or im- 
provement of public roads, it shall be 
the duty of the commission to immediate- 
ly appropriate a sum of money equal to 
the amount expended by the State or 
territorv in the twelve months prior to 
the date of die application. Tin' amount 

appropriated to any one Stale after the 
first of January, 1907, shall not exceed 
$500,000 in any one year. The bill pro- 
vides thai the SU 1 $50,000,000 lie set 

aside for the purpose of a national high- 
way— $85,000,000 in 1907, and the same 
amount in 1908. From the general ex- 
pression of t] U '. members of Congress 
who have discussed the bill, it is certain 
that it will get a large support from the 
members of Congress. 

:|: :!; * 

That the packing house report sent by 
President Roosevelt to Congress will have 
an effect, and possibly a decided one. mi 
the automobile trade and prices of cars 
for next season, ma\ sgem rather far- 
fetched. Nevertheless, it is the truth. 



It is the upholstering branch that is 
affected by the report. Tens of thousands 
of hides are used every year in finishing 
the bodies of motor cars, and witb the 
better grade of cars these are of the best 
quality. In the upholstering of a Thomas 
" Flyer," for instance, (luce full bides 
are used in making the cushions, and in 
this one Buffalo automobile plant alone 
more than 2,000 hides have been used so 
far this year. These are in addition to 
the enormous quantity of the best curled 
gray hail'. 

When the result of the Government in- 
spectors' explorations in Paekingtown 
were made public, there was an immedi- 





Making Dust 
on a Hill 



Every motorist knows 
that to "spurt" up a long 
hill requires a tremendous 
amount of reserve energy ; 
that to reach and sustain 
high speed under such con- 
ditions an engine must be 
capable of developing great 
power. These quali- 
fications have 
made 





famous 
not only as a 
hill-climber but as a car 
always to be depended upon, 
no matter how severe the service. 
And with it all the cost of main- 
tenance is so low that a small allow- 
ance for fuel and lubrication prac- 
tically covers the season's outlay. 

Your nearest dealer (his address 
will be furnished upon application) 
is waiting for an opportunity to 
tell you more about the Cadillac. 
See him. Also let us send our 
Illustrated Booklet M • 

Model K. 10 h. p. Runabout. 
Model M. Light Touring Car (shown above) 
Model H, 30 h. p. Touring Car. 
Lamps not Included. 

Cadillac Motor Car Co., 
Detroit, Mich. 

y^^\ Member Asso. Licensed Auto. JXfrs. 



For aalc by Cuyler Lee. 359 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, 
and Lee Molor Car Company., 1032 So. Main street. Los Anaele*. 



11. 1906 



- 






iianu- 
II ami win! 

with tin' supply ho 

from tin' time thei 
ipplv nf li 
npnolsl i.'.' 11 " high 

hail been contracted fur. The iriwlom of 
this move -""ii became apparent, 

.mi already thai several comp 
made efforts in the pas) «■ 
("lit nut fur a supply, Init have been un- 
able t" il" s". A prospect "f delayed de- 
liveries fur nexl season already confronts 

tliriii as a result. 

» * * 

In 1900 there were 1"!' concerns in the 
United States manufacturing antomo- 

u-iili an investment of $5, ,000. 

In 1905 abonl $40,000,000 was the in- 
vestment in plants. 

* * » 

News comes of the killing of a " motor 
hating dog" "ii tlir San Leandro road. 
This particular animal lias been a nui- 
sance i" all automobilists anil motor- 
cyclists. A motor-cyclist ran oveT this 
particular animal on Sunday, breaking 
his back. The cyclist sustained a few 
minor injuries ami departed before the 
angry Portuguese owning the canine 
could get his breath. The dog should 

have been shot long ago. 

* * * 

Mr. Harry Moore, of Phenix, Arizona. 
has demonstrated the value of carrying 
an anchoT as part of the equipment of 
touring cars. By the use of the anchor, 
Mr. Moore ami his two daughters were 
saved from a horrible end. They were in 
a liif: four-cylinder ear. and were ascend- 
ing a still' grade when tho machine broke 
down, and the brake being jammed, the 
automobile backed swiftly down the 
mountain. Below them, at a bend of the 
road, was a precipice, a sheer drop of al- 
most three hundred feet. Professor 
Moore shouted to his daughters to jump, 
hut they were too (error-stricken, and re- 
mained in the fast-moving machine. The 
father quickly thought of an anchor ami 
rope attachment he had designed for just 
such a circumstance, and, picking up the 
piece of steel, he hurled it far out among 
the rocks. It dragged a short distance, 
and then caught, held firmly, and the 
occupants saw the car hanging over the 
edge of the cliff. 

A. P.. Costigan, manager of the Pacific 
Motor far Company, which has the 
agency for the Packard and the Stearns 
cars, is making a trip through the East- 
ern Stales, lint will he hack in Ran 
Francisco next week. 

* * * 

Mr. S. ('. Hammond, who. with his 
family, is spending his vacation in Lake 
County, visited this city for a few hours 



Pierce 



cytutomobiles 



Great Arrow 



AGENCIES— 

The Geo. V Pierce Co., wholesale 

1013 Clay Street, Oakland, Cal. 

Tho Mobile Carriage Co., 

762 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco. 

Bush & Shields, 

953 South Main St., Los Angeles. 

Waterman Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

Covey & Cook M. C. Co., Portland, Ore. 

Broadway Auto Co., Seattle, Wash. 

To Secure Agency Write Oakland, Calif., Address. 



COLUMBIA 



24-28 Horse Power 



At Readville, Mass., races last month won the ten-mile handicap 
event for stock cars, beating ten other machines of leading makes 

"In winning this race the Columbia lived up to its great reputation of a year ago. '--Boston Herald. 

ABUNDANCE OF SPEED AND POWER 

Another car of the same model, stripped, made the fastest mile of any 
stock car, irrespective of size or power, during the Readville races. 

Middleton Motor-Car Co. ^ZoJ^XT^Z 



The Accessible 



PREMIER 



24H.P. 



LIGHT, 

SPEEDY 

DURABLE 

106 inch wheel base, 4-cylin- 
der, air cooled. 

3 speeds and reverse, se- 
lective type, sliding gears, 
$2,150.00. 

Demonstration by appointment with 

E. P. SLOSSON, 

Agent. Northern California 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The Proper Rent Service 



Our cars cannot be distinguished 
from private vehicles as only the 
latest side entrance high grade 
PopeToledo touring cars are used. 

GOLDEN .STATE AUTO CO. 

Walter S. Hale, General Manager 

Relocated at 547-. r )7 Pulton Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Park :i25. 



"DIRT IN THE HOUSE BUILDS THE HIGH- 
WAY TO BEGGARY." BE WISE IN TIME AND USE 

SAPOLIO 



is 



SAN FUANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 190G 



Cook With Gas 

To 
Cheer the Home 
Bake the Bread 
And Roast the Meats 
That Make the Man 

Fuel Gas at 90 cents. 

Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company 

13th and Clay Streets, Oakland 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

San Francisco 
PAPER 



Temporary Office: 



419 11TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CAL. 



FIRE-PROOF 

BURLAP 

For Tacking on Walls 

Wall Paper 

UHL BROS. , 7 1 7 Market St 

Doing Business al the Old Stand 



CARNEGIE BRICK AND POTTERY COMPANY 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile. 

Fire Clay, Oust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, 

Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile 
Fire-Prcofing, Semi-Dry Pressed Brick, 
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe, Brick and Tile 
Mantels, Flue Linings, Urns and Vases, 
Flower Pots. All kinds of Vitrified Salt- 
Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tejla, Alameda County, Cal. 

Yards: San Francisco. Oakland, Berkeley, San Jose. 

Office, 10th and Division Sts., 

San Francisco 



C. K. Marshall "iSt 

House Renting and Real Estate Agency 
Careful attention given to the care of non- 
resident property. Resident Agent, Am- 
erican Central Insurance Company, 1070 
Broadway, Oakland, Cal. Telephone 
Oakland 3523; Residence, 1903 Telegraph 
Avenue. 

The Waldorf 

Hair Store Branch 

3461 Sacramento Street, 
SWITCHES, WIGS AND HAIR ORNA- 
MENTS. 
Phone West 5606. 

John H. Ware 

Notary Public, Commissioner of Deeds, 1936 
Fillmore Street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
West 6098. At Western National Bank from 2 
l o 3 p. m. 



last Sunday, and says he is having a most 
delightful time touring through Lake 

County in his Model S Oldsmohile. 

* * * 

Mr. II. A. Vint lias recently joined the 
ranks of San Francisco motorists, having 
purchased from the Pioneer Automobile 
Company one of the famous Buick 
"scc.ni wagons." The machine is of the 
two lung variety, and is guaranteed to 
annihilate space. Mr. Vint has been do- 
ing considerable touring through the bay 
counties, and in company with a pari y of 
friends made a long run on the day 
we all celebrate. When questioned re- 
garding the car. be said : " It is the great- 
est ever, and I am more than pleased with 
my new possession. 

Mr. H. C. Culling returned to litis 
city on Friday, after spending several 
weeks in Tonopah, where he took with 
him his Model S Oldsmobile. Mr. Cut- 
ting reports having made several thou- 
sand miles in his ear. lie makes special 
mention of a trip from Hawthorn to 
Bodie. through the Sweei Water Country. 
Al times he was compelled to go over a 
Trade of 12 miles in length, averaging 
probably 20 per cent, and al points as 
much as 35 per eent. A great ileal of 
sand was encountered, and in summing 
up the trip, Mr. Cutting says be does no! 

believe there is another car Imill which 
will duplicate the nerformance of his 

Model S Oldsmobile. 

* * * 

Mr. TJri B. Curtis, the well-known min- 
ing man. has just returned from an ex- 
tended trip through the East, and writes 
that he saw more AVinton touring cars in 
New York than any other one make of 
ear. He is more than ever pleased with 
his Model K Winton, and made a trip 
of 500 miles, consuming three davs' time, 
immediately upon his return to Tono- 
pah. 

* * * 

Mr. E. P. Brinegar, of the Pioneer Au- 
tomobile Company, is in receipt of the 
following telegram from Mr. Harry 
Chickering, who is at present in New 

York City: "Wire Mr. . Tonopah. 

whether he can col Thmuas like mine. 
It's nerfect." The machine referred to 
is a Thomas "Fiver," purchased by Mr. 
Chickering and delivered tn him al Buf- 
falo. This telegram was smtl after mak- 
ing his initial run in the car from 
Buffalo to New York. Mr. ('bickering 

will tour lite New England Slales during 

the next few weeks, then ship his car 
back to Tonopah. 

* * * 

Mrs. J. H. Mackenzie received her new 
Thomas " Fiver " last week, and lias made 
several plea-ant trips through Alameda 
and other bay counties. She is a firm be- 
liever in the fat i thai the Thomas is the 
nnlv car. 



r 

• «L V 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name of Stewart 

Hartsliorn on label. 
Wood Rollers Tin Rollers 



% 



Gity Abstract Co., Inc. 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS 

69 City Hall Avenue 



Will resume business on or about June 5, 
1906. Bank renewals will be given Imme- 
diate al tentlon. 



-ALSO-- 



I'm. insurance Corporations desiring in- 
formation as to record title of property 
covered by insurance can be furnished 
same promptly and on special terms. 



MANZANITA HALL, Palo Alto, Cal. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
i i ■■■.- Incentive to work and right living. Ideal 
dormitory system. One teacher to every five 

boys. Modem languages i< r foreign teachers. 

\ new cinder track for the coining year. Pre- 
pares more especially for Stanford or Yale ant; 
other Eastern institutions. Catalogue on re- 
quest. 14th year. 

J. LEROY DIXON, Principal. 



EUROPE 



FIFTY TOURS 



Tours dc Luxe and Vacation, covering all Europe. Varied 
routes; choice of steamship lines. Including all traveling ex- 
penses $175 to $1185. Leisurely (raveling. 125 offices 
abroad. Established 1641 

Independent Travel Tickets Everywhere. 

Thos. Gook & Son 

Now located at 

410 Fourteenth Street, Oakland 

And Ferry Building, San Francisco 



Real Estate Company 

John Partridge, President 



759 Fillmore Street 



San Francisco 



AUTO TIPS 



san JOSE— Hotel Vendome. Rendezvous to. 

MiiliiniMliiiM.c t'.a thing pavilion ; mm mo 

gs rage; gasoline at all hours. 

I'"i »R gasoline, sun dries ami repairs at San 

Jose stop at Letcher's Automobile Gai 
corner First and St. James. Tel. Main 303. 
LOS OLIVOS— Hotel Los Ollvos. .Midway be- 
tween Santa Barbara ana ^^n Luis Obispo, 

First-class In all respects; auto parties run- 
ning between San Francisco and Los Angeles 
all stop here. Good shooting and fishing dur- 
ing seasons. 



HEADQUARTERS— 

Automobile Clothing (or Men and Women 

ROOS BROS. 

Goggles. Hoods. Robes. Etc. Fillmore and O'Farrell Stree 



^ TBIGyG.LE. COMPANYS* 
lnvaS3SJ5_olling Chairs 

k -TTH1CYCIX CHAIRS 



2018MarkclSl,Sei>Fra 
837 South Sprin. SI J 












v 









f 



- 

Iiauf- 

<1«'hI towar 

if followed in 

man; owners who allow their chauffeurs 

the latter who is hauled before the 

The owner willingly pays 
lino, hut he would nol hance 

if he had m go before the judge and face 
tlio music. 

* * * 

Frank W. Marston, owner of tin' Man- 
ton building on the northeast corner of 
Kearny street and Hardie PI* 
Francisco, won the first prize at thi 9 

Fourth of July celebration in his 
Peerless car. for the best decorated aui ■- 
mobile. Those in the ear included Air. 
and Mr.-. Marston, Mr. and Mrs. Bobct 
Neal, Charles E. Beck, Thomas \V. 
Iliekev. Exalted Ruler of San Fran 
f,od"c No. 3, and Herman Kohn, 
Secretary of San Francisco Lodee No. . 
Mr. Marston's ear was beautifully deco- 
rated, and drew forth a great deal of 

favorable comment. 

• • • 

Mr. John J. Mullin, of Tonopah, has 

driven his Model K Winton some 5,000 
miles over the desert, anil his car is 
reported as being in first-class condition. 
" Tin' Model K is just the machine for 

Nevada," said Mr. Mullin. 

* * * 

Another Model S Oldsmohile will go 
forward to Messrs. Oson and Hunter, if 
San Jose, during the present week. 

* * * 

The Winton factory, during the past 
.nil:, shipped to the Pacific Coast thirty 
Model K Wintons, as follows: Two car- 
loads to T.os Angeles, one to Portland, 
one to Seattle, one to Tacoma, and five 
to the Pioneer Automobile Company at 
San Francisco. Each carload contained 
three machines. In a letter recently re- 
ceived by the Pioneer people from Mr. 
Charles B. Shanks, general sales mana- 
ger of the Winton Motor Carriage Co., 
he stated that his company has shipped to 
date 1,100 Model K machines. Inasmuch 
as their output for the season is to be 
only 1200, there remain but 100 machines 
to be shinned. The Pioneer Automobile 
Comnanv have been fortunate enough to 
secure twenty-five of the machines unsold, 
and same will be shipped to them during 
the months of July and August. 

The success with which the Model S 
Oldsmohile has met all over the country 
has simply been phenomenal. This car 
was designed by Mr. E. H. Coffin, and 
was first shown at the New York Show. 
Deliveries, however, were nol made un- 
til several weeks afterwards. There have 



- M . B v\ 

mutual bul 
i automobile. 

• • » 

Mr. I •. ' • ad family made 

a trip around tl Sunday Is 

Model K Winton touring i 

• » • 

M iss Agni - \\ ood, who made so BUI - 
I a run from London to Edinburgh 
on a Clement-Talbol motor-cycle, also 
gained the tiist prize at the recent hill- 
climhing contest nl Froomes Hill, Berl 
fordshire, on the same car. 
• • • 
The nneumatic tire does ii"i seem t.> 

have much to fear from the rivalry of 

the soring wheel, in a recenl competi- 
tion in France for spring wheels, all 
the competitors, barring three, were ruled 

out. As there were three gold medals 

lor distribution, the final resull neces 

'lid nol pul any undue strain on 

die judge's forensic facull 

• * * 

The Pacific Motor Car Company, 
agents for the Packard. Stearns and Stev- 
ens-Duryea motor ears, has just com- 
pleted a splendid garage at 1416-1417 
Broadway, Oakland, where they are pre- 
pared to overhaul and adjust ears. They 
announce the opening of the garage, and 

make the simultan is announcement 

that the 1907 Packard touring car will 
fie ready for delivery about October of 
this vcar. 



TEE FMUMONT. 

The Law brothers announce the open- 
ing of the Fairmont in December. The 
original plans of Baumgarten, Mrs. 
Oelrichs' architect, who died a day or two 
alter the earthquake, are to be carried 
out. except that hard wood is to be used 
instead of soft. The lower floors are to 
be finished immediately, and later on at- 
tention will be given to I lie upper stories. 

By the way, the daily newspaper para- 
graphed persist in calling this great 
caravanserai the " Fairniounty" when n 
should be "Fairmont." 



Hotel Imperial 

93i toot stwet ui ruacisco 



European Plan 

Electric Cars Direct From Ferries 

Telephones, Electric Lights, Elevator 

Baths, Steam Heal 

Every Courtesy and Attention 



, 



E. S. DeWOLFE, Proprietor 



NOW IS THE TIME!!! 

To restore your silverware that has been 
injured by the fire 

Just Like New 

First, class repairing of 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY 
our specialty 

HAMMERSMITH & FIELD 

801 VAN NESS AVENUE, COR. EDDY STREET 
Phone Emergency 138 Cars pass the door 



.1 77,7/' TO MOQUI LAND 

AND THE GRAND CANYON. 

Between August L2th and August L5tu 
a special party conducted by Mr. F. \Y. 
Prince, tickel agent of the Santa I '. 
lines, will leave San Francisco for that 
most interesting country, known as 
" Mmpii Land," situated in the northern 
part of Arizona. The party will go to 
Canyon Diablo, and there take wagons 
to the (own of Oraibi, where the dramatic 
pagan ceremony of the Pueblo Indians. 
popularly known as the Mold snake 
dance, will occur this year. 

A stop of some hours will be made 
al a trading post known as "The 
Fields,"' in order to witness a big Navajo 
feast, pony races, foot races, lariating 
wild horses, Indian dances, etc. 

On the return, those of the party who 
imp- desire will be conducted to the 
Grand Canyon by way of Williams, Ari- 
zona, where several davs will be spent in 
viewing what is without question 
America's greatest scenic wonder. 



ef H 



\ 



A Full Stock of 

Chipped and Ground Glass 

At 1818 1-2 POST STREET 
Pacific Window Glass Co. 



*\ 



J 



90 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, L906 




b30Kffi ON 



Now comes Uie political manipulator 
with branding iron and rope read}' to 
"heel'' your "piker" statesman before 
allowing his name t<> go before the con- 
vention. There will be a whiff of dis- 
agreeable smoke, indicating singed hail', 
a cloud of dust and a puzzled looking 
political steer pawing the air and trying 
the while to cover the branded spot. If 
some provision could be made at Sacra- 
mento for the canning of these branded 
steers, instead of permitting them to in- 
flict on the community a rather poor 
quality of canned laws, we would be will- 
ing tn accept them, even if tie' label does 
not bear the dale of manufacture. 

That noise heard in the distance is nut 
lb.- dynamiting of unsafe buildings; it is 
merely Mr. Hearst making up his mind 
to support Bryan for the Presidency. 

* * * 

Evidences of the decay of the British 
empire multiply daily. The latest is tin' 
edict that the chimney-pot hat must go. 
Where will British respectability, as em- 
bodied in the top-hatted grocer, be when 
the low. rakish substitutes for head-geai 
we have with us displace the silk tile? 
Echo answers. Where? 

* * * 

Further exnerimentir in the matter 

of municipalization of lights — red lights 
— will he tried in San Francisco. The 
Board of Supervisors arc satisfied with 
the way the "man higher up" exploited 
(be district having a monopoly of this 
form of illumination previous to the lire. 
It is the purpose of the Board to extend 
the same courtesies with a trifle of added 
power to make u" for any possible loss 
arising from the recent calamity. 

* * * 

Diogenes, who long ago gave up his 
search for an honest man and turned his 
attention to the discovery of a corporation 
with a conscience, has put out his lantern 
and retired in peace to his tub. The 
corporation with a conscience unearthed 
bv Diogenes is one of the richest in the 
world — the Pennsylvania Railroad. After 
due investigation, it finds that there is 
a tendency towards showing partiality to 
certain shippers to the injury of others 
■jiliere its offiiinls ami employees liold 
stock in enterprises doing business nJnnij 
its line*. 

The officials and employees, witli an eve 
to the main chance, saw that cars were 
always on hand to move freight that 
would fatten their dividends, and where 
an enterprise, in which they held stock, 
could get a shade the besi of it by inter- 
pretation of the complicated classification 
code, the proper interpretation — for 
their pockets — was always forthcom- 
ing. This — in the language 
the initiated — is playing both ends 
against the middle, with the public and 
the smaller companies as the middle. 

President Cassatt, however, is working 



overtime to earn a halo. He has ordered 
the discbarge of any official holding stock- 
in any concern — especially mining — do- 
ing business along the lines of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad or any railroad con- 
trolled by it. 

* * * 

What has become of Ismar, the Gypsy? 
Xo more do her half-page advertisements 
loom up in the dailies. Xo move does she 
announce that she can tell the past, pres- 
ent and future. Xo more are the suffer- 
ing importuned to D e to her for solace. 

1 imagine the earthquake finished Ismar 
so far as prophecy is concerned. She 
could not announce that she knew before- 
hand all about the great disaster without 
raising the question: "Why didn't you 
warn us?" And to refrain from saying 
that she knew all about il is a tacit admis- 
sion that she was in ignorance id' what 
was to conn — which would be fatal to the 

prophecy business. 

* * * 

We notice that our friend, the Oakland 
Tribune, last Saturday quoted one id' 
Henley's best-known poems, with the air 
of having made a find, and then credited 
it to the Xew York Sun. This sort of 
thing will never do For the Athens of 

the Pacific. 

* * * 

Judging by ibe number of self-an- 
nounced candidates for the various vacan- 
cies on ibe Bench ai the forthcoming elec- 
tion, the question naturally arises how 
closely discrimination in practice is re- 
lated to the argumentation of judicial as- 
pirations. 

* * * 

It is time for a new version of the old 
saying "gone to pot," "Poheimed" is 
suggested as a substitute. The ex-Com- 
missioner went in for pottery and lost bis 
job accordingly, lie was done from the 
\i-vy start, lie should have been better 
versed in Aesop; Ihen he would have 
known that no mere porcelain vessel can 
safely Boat with a brazen article like 

1,'llef. 

* * # 

It is not at all unlikely that one re- 
sult of the late disturbance may be ibe 
popularization of Ibe knickerboekor. The 
dust ami lilih of the city have necessi- 
tated some wear oilier (ban the ordinary 
trouser. The men whom one meets in 

knickerbockers or in riding br lies and 

leggings look so much more comfortable 
than the ordinary that their example can- 
not fail of effect. The nether male habili- 
ments are much worn in Canada, where 
die English tourisl no longer appears to 
monopolize their use. Of course, the 
Anglophobe would cry out against the in- 
novation, bill nearly all progress has been 
made in spile of Ibe Anglophobe. 

* * * 

The Board of Health lias decided, per- 
haps wisely, thai though Ibe inhabitants 
of the refugee camps must have their legs 
pulled as a matter of relief, they shall 
be protected from having their teeth 
pulled by a woman. We are getting 
on. 

* * * 

You should see Xavier Martinez, the 
artist in bis red sweater and Parisian cor- 



duroy student trousers. Some misguided 
female writing for the daily press has 
called that sweater a waistcoat. Perish 
ibe thought ! Martinez would scorn a 
waistcoat. The loss id' bis studio and the 
consequent compulsory retirement of the 
artist to Piedmont lias been an excellent 
tiling for him. He has accomplished 
some splendid work, and will possibly 
date the recognition of his worth, which 
is really remarkable, from the notorious 
LStfa day of April. 



Poller Garnett, clubman and Bohemian, 
doing bis steady daily stunt of work, and 
doing it mighty well, is one of our new 
miracles. Garnett calls himself a pro- 
letarian now. He says that Ibe earthquake 
must have caused a veritable revolution, 
lb' found himself calling a colored per- 
son "old man," which for a hitherto un- 
reconstructed Southerner was certainly a 
remarkable, not to say, embarrassing con- 
dition of things. 



No affliction, no trouble, no combina- 
tion of circumstances, could prevent the- 
Examiner from being an agitator, an en- 

geiulerer of strife. 1 1 bas excited a lot 
of foolish women of San Francisco into 
mobbing the supply depots and demand- 
ing Hour. Xo one is denying that Ibe 
-ale of a large quantity of Ibis Hour was 
a criminal blunder: but if what is on 
hand were to be given out indiscrimin- 
ately, as the Examiner is urging the peo- 
ple lo demand, il would not last a month. 
Some sort of a system must he main- 
tained. Perhaps the one employed now 

is not so g 1 as il might be: bul il is far 

better (ban the lack of system advocated 

by the Examiner. That paper's true 
character is understood by many. But it 
has a lot of adherents who read no other 
paper, who lock upon whal il says as gos- 
pel, and who are willing to follow any 
advice it gives. The paper could be made 
a great source of good : but conducted as 







' 









till' 
lii. Hears! papers in thr 
ni more Uian a 

. ami in a hun- 

■iii that ho has 

difornia at 

• • * 

Two oTcr-1 
brutes, male ami fcmal< I the 

: men ami women traveling mi an 
•uml K'lilv street car on Friday 
evenii hale passing the encamp- 

ment at Jefferson Square, when 

unfortunates are packed in tents 
mill fcil (God save the mark!) at the 
pleasure of the most insolent Bet >>f ras- 
cals of whom this world has ever heard 
or read. " Better off," snuffed tin- fe- 
male brute, ** than they ever were in their 

■■ Ever were, <>v ever will he." grunted 
the M. 15. by her Bide. 

"Ami serve them right, too," came the 
affirmative response from tin- accom- 
panying libel upon humanity. " 1 guess 
they are getting about whal is coming 

to thrill." 

The twain then wrinkled the blubber 
mi their heavy-set jowls as they smirked 
one .it tin" other with mutual approval. 

Those who heard them with disgust 

could only hope that the swine would in 
ilue time get *' what was coming to them," 
and live to remember at the fatal moment 
when the axe of Vengeance falls, their 
scornful commentary upon the misfor- 
tune of unhappy women and children 
protected from the chill of night and 
driving fog by a cloth of canvas. As it 
is. the foul brutes can only be dispised 
as moral lepers accursed by God and des- 
pised by mankind. 

* * * 

The latest argument against Pardee's 
renomination is from the Engelbright 



• amp. ami to - 

that the p 

that 

I her. 

friendly t 
hunch of in 



■< I that P 
U in 

ill home, ami that 
deal n 



I) mil : 

thing into dis- 

favor in his home i ounty. 
* • • 
The I M . i lane, the 

" lighting par-. giving 

the -uihlu' his ideas of 
When he's through with hi* font 
lions mi the " Frenzied Pace." " Frenzied 
Finance," " Frenzied l.u in::." and 
•• Frenzied Dyine." he might add a three- 
quarter of an hour gabfesl on " Fri 
Sky Pilota." 



ANNOUNCE OPENING. 

McMahon, Eeyer \ Stiegler Bros., 
Inc., "The Tailors," announce by means 
of a beautifully engraved card in two 

colors the opening of " the largest and 
most thoroughly up-to-date tailoring es- 
tablishment on the Pacific ('nasi at Van 
Ness avenue and Ellis street, and of 
their branch at O'Farrell street, at Fill- 
more. The linn is one of the best in the 
city, and the beautiful handiwork of 
expert people is turned out at moderate 
prices. 



A PERTINENT PARAGRAPH. 

Mr. Willis Polk, of San Francisco, and 
Mr. AYilliam C. Lewis, of New York, 
have been admitted as associate archi- 
tects into the firm of Messrs. D. H. Burn- 
ham & Co. They are part of an asso- 
ciation to be established in San Fran- 
cisco, which includes a complete "corps 
of designers, constructional and me- 
chanical engineers." 



Pears' 

Pears' Soap fur- 
nishes all the skin 
needs, except water. 

Just how it 
cleanses, softens 
and freshens the 
delicate skin-fabric, 
takes longer to ex- 
pound than. to expe- 
rience. Use a cake. 

Sold in every quarter of the globe. 

New Gampi's Restaurant 

NOW OPEN 

French and Italian Oinners 

1569 Ellis St., Near Fillmore 



Bowleg g ed. 

Perkins — Springer "couldn't catch a 
pig in a three-foot alley," as they say. 
Parkins — No, indeed ! And I understand 
that in his childhood days his father 
could use him for a boot-jack. — Ameri- 
can Spectator. 



200,000 Copies 



^—Overland Monthly — 

Two Large Editions of the May EARTHQUAKE AND FIRE NUMBER 

were sold out. 



The June-July Combination Number will be devoted to 

NEW SAN FRANCISCO AND RECONSTRUCTION 

NEWSDEALERS: will please note that this will be full of splendid illustrations and 
will be as fine a seller as the May issue-out about July 18th. 



GAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jdly 14, 1906 



AT THE ORPHEUM. 

Rarely, if ever, has a musical act in 
vaudeville utilized so bewildering an ar- 
ray of instruments as those employed by 
"The Military Octette" and the "Girl 
with the Baton," in the spectacle in three 
-'■lies showing army life in Russia, In- 
dia and America, and which will be pre- 
sented for the first time in San Fran- 
cisco at the Orpheum this Sunday after- 
noon. Cornets, trombones, bugles, fifes 
ami drums, Roman triumphal trumpets, 
tom-toms, violins, cymbals, tambourines 
and triangles are successfully handled by 
the members of the " Military Octette/' 
under the guidance of the "Girl with the 
Raton." Carlin and Otto, who stand in 
the lirsl rank of German comedians, and 
who are great favorites in this citv, will 
receive a warm welcome. They come 
with a capital routine of side-splitting 
dialogue. Irving Jones, the little colored 
comedian, who has no superior as a laugh 
producer, will enliven proceedings for 
about fifteen minutes, lie will sing some 
nt his own compositions, and tell a lot 
ut new stories. The Gartelle brothers, 
exponents of comedy skating, will intro- 
duce some stunls on rollers, and will show 
how tunny it is when you don't know how 
and how graceful it is when you do. 
Claude Gillingwater and company have 
reserved for their second and last week 
" The Wrong Man," the uproarious com- 
edy iu which the youn~ comedian made 
such a hit last year. Linden Beclcwith, 
" the singing portrait," will he heard in 
new selections; Ziska and King will vary 
their comedy magic, and the Orpheum 
motion pictures, showing the latest novel- 
ties, will complete a varied and interest- 
ing programme. The grounds of the 
Chutes, where the Orpheum is situated, 
are lull of amusement surprises and sen- 
sations, and the Zoo is well stocked with 
rare and interesting animals. 



A TRIANGULAR OCEAN LINE. 

Los Angeles and Honolulu are hobnob- 
bing, and the project is to put on the 
Alameda and the Mariposa on a San 
Francisco, Los Angeles. Honolulu run. 
The matter was brought before a com- 
mittee in Honolulu recently, and the sen- 
timent of the committee was that the 
Oceanic Steamship Company would no 
doubt prove loyal to San Francisco. Mr. 
Smith suggested that it would be wise 
to present the matter to the Oceanic 
Company from the island end of the line. 
■ iiiil point out what would seem to be an 
advantage to the company. 

Mr. Spalding suggested that whate\<i 
be done, the committee express its appre- 
ciation of the disaster which has befallen 
San Francisco, and show that the new 
triangular plan is not proposed to take 
away business from San Francisco, but 
to assist the company and California to 
maintain its ocean business. It was stated 
at tile meeting that at present people were 
not making San Francisco their head- 
quarters owing to its lack of hotel ac- 
commodations. 

Mr. Smith said that if Honolulu did 
not get its full quota of tourists this 



coming season it would be because of 
San Francisco's circumstances. The com- 
mittee thought that the triangular plan 
meant independent business. 

It is more than probable that it would 
pay the Oceanic Company to put the two 
steamers mi in addition to the regular 
Australian line. At the same time, it 
would be well if the Honolulu people be 
reminded thai San Francisco's hotel ac- 
commodations arc equal to all (he de- 
mand that may lie made mi them by the 
tourist for Honolulu. Aloha! San 
Francisco is si ill ir.illu-l/i-hau! and only 
;i -mall part of it is pan ! There is no 
pilakea here at the present time, an. I 
we are quite capable "i' accommodating 
all comers and the tourists fo see the 
ruins are legion. It's Aloha! to tine. 
sweet Hawaii. 



SUCCESS IN STRENUOUS TIMES. 
To the American Type Pounders Com- 
pany is due the thanks of (he public pri- 
marily, and in a secondary sense the 
gratitude of the printing trades. With 
an unusual foresight, the management 
took hold of the situation immediately 
after the lire. and. indeed, during the liic 
and realizing that lime was the prime fac- 
tor, ordered the concentration of all its 
stock on hand at the various Pacific 
•Coast branches, at Oakland, and 
then from temporary quarters it pro- 
ceeded to rehabilitate a crippled indus- 
try. It is to this company that credit 
is due for the early appearance of the 
daily newspapers in their old dress. The 
community is indebted to the American 
Type Founders Company in a way that 
it can only repay by an unbounded future 
patronage. 



MILWAUKEE MECHANICS. 
The Milwaukee Mechanics' is to be 
sued in California by one set of the in- 
sured and in Wisconsin by another. A 
plan is being perfected to form an asso- 
ciation to briii" an action in the Stat 
of Wisconsin, with a view to carrying 
matters to a focus. The immediate re- 
sult of a suit in that State will be to 
throw the company into the bands of 
a trustee for .tie benefit of the policy- 
holders, and thereupon a division of the 
a ssi Is of the company will be ordere I 
by the courts in liquidation of its in- 
debtedness to the policv-holders. The 
company is apparently solvent, but there 
is a disinclination among the directo- 
rate to disburse money without some legal 
action that will bring into force the 

statutes of Wisconsin and absolve the 
directors of blame as regards the stock- 
holders in the company. 



A NICE COUPLE. 
The ( Izar lias a habit of spending more 
time in bis study than almost an\ other 
ruler in the world. The Czarina is al- 
ways scaled with him while he is at work- 
in this room. In this respect he stands 
almost alone among great monarchs, as 
nearly all of them prefer to have women 
out of the way when they are immersed 
in the business of State in their own 
private rooms. 



UNEQUALED FACILITIES. 

The Hotel Maryland, situated between 
Laguna and Buchanan, on Pago street, 
is one of the. modern apartment houses 
which suffered not even a crack of plas- 
ter through the 'quake. It is situated out- 
side the burned district, and was one of 
the beautiful new buildings finished just 
before the catastrophe. It is to be opened 
next week, and rooms may be selected 
now. M. G. Litton, the manager, 
was formerly of the Maryland, on V -si 
street. The Hotel Maryland consists of 
apartments, furnished and unfurnished, 
and of furnished rooms. There are plenty 

of private bath facilities. There are in 
all 1^5 rooms, and it is lirsl class in 
every respect. The furniture is new. 
and people desiring convenience in Icea- 

I i' ni, coupled with all the- ceinfoits of 
homo, will do well to seek (lie Hotel 

Maryland. 



DELAYS ALE DANGEROUS. 

The Dutchess Insurance Company is ; n 
no better position than in the past. Its 

chief adjuster is a man named Hodge, 
and be does not seem to he able or willing 
to give any conciliatory information r ■- 
garding the immediate future policy if 
the company. Certain policy-holders 
arc averring that there is something 
criminal in the interminable delay. 
Three months have passed, and the able 

Mr. Eodge has achieved nothing thai is 
apparent to the policy-bolder. It is re- 
ported that this company expei ts to pay 
25 per cent, but the renresenlatives of 
the company are reported as saying that 
" they do not know what the losses of 
the company may be!" There is no truth 
in this statement. This company has all 
its records, and (be statement, if made, 
is a criminal subterfuge. Immediate ac- 
tion at law should be taken. 



THE PISH QUEEN. 

Lady William Cecil, the only English 
woman who accompanied Princess Ena to 
Spain, has a fine ancestral home, Hun- 
manby Hall, near Scarborough. A quaint 
custom takes place every year on the 
neighboring sands of Filey. Seated on 
horseback, Lady Cecil as lady of the 
manor rides out to sea at low tide, and 
when she is unable to go further, a stake 
i- driven in, and this boundary marks the 
limit of her royalty over the fishing. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal plaeoof boalnoaii -,,, Prancteco California. 

Location -if wi.rkh Virginia Cily, StorOJ Cuiiily. Nerada. 

Notice i» lierebj itivon that at a mooting of the Board of Directori 
held on the 5Ui da] oi loly, 1006, ml i monl [Mo D) of ten (10) 

coota par auaro waa loriod u| thi capita] took of the corporation, 

payable Imniedlatelj in United State* gold coin, t.. Lbe aecrel 

the office . >f the company, 889 Bath Street. San Prandaeo, California. 

\n v i'i i. hi tvliii 1 1 tin a- . in. ni -imii ren iii iii unpaid on the 

Huh day <>f Auguft, 1900, win be delinquent and advertised f"r *ale at 
i ni id, i- ,, i n i i..h. and, anleas payment « made before, wll] be lold on 

i BIDA1 the 111 i da] of tagu t, J I at i -'el- k p m„ to paj the 

delinquent asses* «t, w-eiin>r with On- cost "f advertising ami aa- 

peneee >■( tale Bj order of the Board of Directors, 

jobd « rwiaas - i 

Office. 830 HuhIi mni i. San Pranolsao, I Bllfornln, 



Bekins Van and Storage 

Cut rate Shippers 

Telephone Us 






uppn-w rhilil labor 






that 

burdens from human shoulders, laying 

maml 

for cheap rhilil hil*>r. The ignorant, the 

. the inefficient, the little children, 

can often profitably repli 

num. ami the wife and child enter the 

the father 
in earning a livelihood, but oftener to 

with him and drag his 
down. This revolution in the problem 
of wage-earning tends t" reduce individ- 
ual wages from an amount sufficient to 
m a in tai n a family as the unit in so 
to an amount sufficient onlv to maintain 
an individual as the unit. Thus \ 

■•pins that exaggerated individual- 
ism which even the mutual in- 
terdependence of the home, and hurls 
into the face of the baby that ancient 
edict: "He that will not work, neither 
shall he eat!" 

That many serious-minded laboring 
people look with alarm upon this growing 
tendency to adapt the factory to the size 
and ability of the little child, is evident 
fro7n the growing reluctance of men 
whose trades are being caotured by ig- 
norant and inefficient child labor to bring 
offspring into a world which cannot prom- 
ise a life of the simplest comforts in re- 
ward for hard labor. Here is the real 
danger of that "Race Suicide" so vig- 
orously condemned by President Roose- 
velt ; for while the man of yirtue and 
strength is deterred from propagating his 
kind because of the jeopardy in which 
the children would stand, the yieious and 
ignorant, the physical]-" unfit and the dis- 
couraged arc not deterred by any such 
consideration, but regardless of conse- 
quences, continue to propagate and swell 
the proportion of those who will be from 
birth to death a heavy liability again t 
society. 






LUCKY TEDDY. 

President Roosevelt has an account at 
the Riggs National Bank in Washington. 
The bookkeepers have no end of trouble 
keeping the President's balance straight, 
because so many people who get clucks 
from the President fail to cash them, 
preferring to preserve the checks as sou- 
venirs. So many persons are willing to 
pay from $1 to $10 for an imcashed check- 
signed by the President that hundreds of 
dollars are saved the President every 
year. 



Bjornstierne Bjornson, the Scan- 
dinavian author, began his literary career 
by writing hymns. It was intended that 
he should become a farmer. 






oubled 
(plain 

Though how ll, ; 

I'll hold I' ill.iw all tli 

plit, 
My aightway al 

And bind my objects with a passive 

halt. 
In -lion, unloose nv\ tongue from Gram- 
mar's hit 
And curse all rules grammarians 
writ. 
Iv. only, you will just agree 
To -i g me of pedantry." 



ONE IN EVERY 



1,200 

PERSONS BLIND. 



The total number of blind persons in 
the United States in 1900 was 64,763— 

or about one in every 1,800 of the total 
population. There were 35,645 totally 
blind, and 29,118 partially blind. These 
figures, however, can be considered onlv 
as the minimum, as an unknown propor- 
tion of the blind were not located by the 
enumerators. The number of partially 
blind by no means represents the facts 
as to defective eyesight, but represents 
only " verified " cases. 

Of the total number of blind, 37,054, 
or 57.2 per cent, were males, and 27,709, 
or 41.S per cent, were females. Since in 
the general population only 51.1 per cent 
were males and 48.9 per cent were fe- 
males, it is evident that blindness occurs 
more frequently among males. 

About 55 per cent of the blind reported 
were totally blind, and about 45 per cent 
were partially blind. A slightly smaller 
proportion of blind males than of blind 
females were totally blind. 



Carlotta Nillson, who is spending 

the summer in Paris, will return to 
America in August to begin rehearsals 
for her new play. 






I /.' / I ■ 

then 

. with inn 
put the o 
shade. The New \\ 

which 
"ill have ,ii Monday, the 

inst., i- the latest, largesl and 
artistic establishment erected up to 

dale. 

Ii- artistic lines ai usual 

with all that Mr. Raphael Weill evi 
The rear half of the stoi 
a broad stair-case from the main aisle, 

and heiii" elevated a 

an imposing \ iew of the from 
tabliahment. Carloads of new 
being unloaded, and the 

ei the W bite I louse on opening da 
contain as novel and attractive a 

in l>e found in the country, ready 

to supply the i I- of the thousands who 

have wailed to gel i be best. The friends 
and customers of the While House are to 
be congratulated on the old linn's enter- 
prise, not only in helping to build up 
our eily, but in opening up with its new 

and magnificent stock. 

The floor sinice is 155 In L95 feet, 
and' an "L" will be added at the rear. 

extending to California street. 



AN ARTIST'S LUCK. 
About the only way to keep a secret is 
not to have one — was strongly ilk'.sc-atetl 
by Mr. James O'Xeill. who on the stage 
in "Monte Cristo " plays a man with 
"Nothing but Money," as the saying 
goes. At various times. Mr. O'Neill ha- 
tried lo he thai man in real life, by go- 
ing into various enterprises, bo* the re- 
sult, has always been loss of money— last 
year a friend induced him to go into a 
gold mining scheme in Mexico. Mr. 
O'Neill made up his mind not to tell 
any one. that in case of failure his friends 
would not have the chance of giving him 
the merry ha-ha — "But murder will out." 
On his return from Ireland, near'y every 
one he met congratulated l.im on his 
great success. The Mexican mine has 
turned out to be one of the greatest-pay- 
ing mines in recent years 



f* 



OFFICES, DESK ROOM AND STORES TO RENT 

MARKET STREET, BETWEEN THIRD AND FOURTH 
in the new 

Midway Office Building 

Under Constiuction, to be Completed July 15th. 
Single or double offices, 10x10, 10x20 and 12x20. 
Desk room 10x10. 
Stores 20x64. 

Apply on premises, or to 

THOMAS MAGEE & SONS Real Estate Agents 

5 MONTGOMERY STREET 



!5 % 



V 



-/ 



24 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1-1, 190G 



PLEASURED 
WAND 




Minetti Quartette in the Greek Theatre. 

The University of California an- 
uounces that the Minetti String Quar- 
tette will give its second concert in tlu- 
Greek Theatre at 3:30 o'clock on Thurs- 
day afternoon, July 19th. This is the 
third of a series of six concerts arranged 
for the summer by the University of 
California, and given on Thursday af- 
ternoons by the University Orchestra and 
the Minetti Quartette in alternation. The 
programme will include the Quartette in 
G Minor by Haydn, a "Canzonetta " by 
Godard, " The Bee," by Schubert, and 
the Quartette in 1). op. 11, by 1'. 
Tschaikowsky. The Minetti Quartette 
consists ni' Giulio Minetti, first violin: 
Hans Koenig, second violin; Andre Ver- 
dier, viola : and Arthur Weiss, violon- 
cello. 

For twelve years past the Minetti 
Quartette has given annual series of con- 
certs of chamber music in San Francisco. 
They have been the chief exponents in 
California of this noble and beautiful 
form of music. The audience which as- 
sembled for the first concert by the Quar- 
tette in the Greek Theatre, on July 5th. 
was several times larger than had ever 
gathered for one of the Minetti Quar- 
tette concerts in San Francisco. The 
musicians were delighted alike by the 
hearty popular response to this new musi- 
cal endeavor of the University, ami by 
the adequacy and the charm of the Greek 
Theatre as a place for such music. 
* * * 

Clay Clement's elahorate new produc- 
tion of "Sam Houston" will he played 
in San Francisco early this season, with 
Mr. Clement in the title role, providing a 
suitable theatre is available. This noted 
actor will he remembered for his brillianl 
performance of Baron Hohenstaufl'en. in 
his own play. " The New Dominion," and 
for his impressive acting in "The Bells." 
Of Mr. Clement's long career on the 
stage, covering a wide range of strong 



parts, including tin' greatest Shakespear- 
ean roles, his creation of Sam Houston is 
his masterpiece. The famous empire 
builder of the Southwest, who carved out 
Texas ami banded it over to the United 
States thus furnished the home Slate of 
the actor who was to create his image 
on the stage; and Mr. Clement, though 
a Texan by adoption, is deeply loyal to 
the State and as great an admirer of the 
conqueror of Santa Anna as any other 
Texan. Faithfully and lovingly Mr. 
Clement has spent years studying to make 
Houston an admirable addition to the 
American stago-porlrail gallery of celeb- 
rities. The actor has examined a great 

majority of letters, papers. I ks. and 

photographs sent from all parts of the 
South, and he has read no less than ">'•' 
biographies. The play has been written 
with equal care, and will have power and 
dignity, patriotism and romance i" cor- 
respond to the heroic central figure. To 
complete the genuine worth of the pro- 
duction ami fulfill all expectations of a 
thoroughly first-class production. Mr. 
Clement has spenl thousands of dollars 
on such details as the costumes. There 
will be over fifty people in the metropoli- 
tan company supporting the star, as the 
stirring frontier scenes of the Southwest 
before the war will he vividly reproduced, 
though the play is noi in any sense a 
melodrama and not a shot is fired. Mr. 
Clement has the features, the large frame 
and the force to lit him with remarkable 
accuracy into the role of Houston. The 
incidental singing will he supplied by two 
distinguished vocalists, and a number of 
remarkable stage pictures have been sup- 
plied by a noted scenic artist. While the 
play, " Sam Houston," is bound to have 
great historical interest, and will !«• his- 
torically accurate in detail, it will be a 
great drama of heart interest chiefly; and 
it will naturally he so. for Houston lived 
a romance ami wrote thrilling climaxes 
with the sword. 

* * * 

<>ne infliction of Thaw-White-Beale 

was enough for the play, " Mamzelle 

Champagne." It died after their first 

appearance. It had created quite a 
favorable impression until these worthies 



Orph 



. - —_ FORMERLY CHUTES 
CUIIl THEATRE 



Week Com men ana Sunday Matinee, July 15. 
Matinees every day except Monday. 

ANOTHER BIG SHOW 

"The Miliary Octette" end "The Girl Wilh the Baton;' 
Argyro Kastron; Carlio and Olto; Irving Jones: Gartelle Bro- 
thers; Linden Beckwith; Ziska and King; Orpheum Motion 
Pictures and last weelc of 

CLAUDE G1LLINGWATER 6t CO. 

Evening Prices: 10. 25 and 50 cents. Matinees, except Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 10 and 25 cents. 

Down Town Box Office at Donlon's Drug Store. Fillmore and 
Sutler Streets. Phone. West 6000. 

CHUTES and ZOO— Open daily horn 10 a.m. to mid. 
night; admission 1 0c; children. 5c 



appeared, and now it is still running, 
hut simply awaiting burial. It may I"' 
laid down as one of the Madison Square 
failures. 

4c * * 

Belasco & Mayer are to he housed at 
the corner of Sutter and Steiner within 
sixty days. This is to he a one-story 
building, with a seating capacity of one 
thousand. The old favorites have been 

re-engaged. 

* * * 

The Chutes is attracting more at- 
tention even day from the amusement- 
loving people of San Francisco. Here is 
given lo a great city unlimited cheap and 

wholesome sp.ni. ami no city appreciates 
ii more highly, if one is to judge by the 
immense patronage allotted this great en- 
terprise by the public. 



.1 POPULAR INSTITUTION. 

On Monday next the Woman's Ex- 
i lunge will open in its new quarters, 
I'lo franklin street, near Pine. It was 
hoped that the event might take place 
3 e day this week, hut many little ob- 
stacles which might have interfered with 
the complete success of restoration day 
caused a postponement until Monday. On 
that day, installed in convenient quar- 
ters, the Exchange will resume all its 
Features, chief among them being an ap- 

oelizing table d'hote luncheon, which 

w ill be served at 50 cents. 



All kinds of interior repair work and furniture made to order as 
usual. UNITED CRAFTS AND ARTS. 147 Presidio Ave. 



McMahon 
Keyer <Si> 
Stiegeler 
Bros. 
Inc. 



Van Ness Ave. at Ellis 
O'Farrell Street at Fillmore 





Haberdashers 

for 

Gentlemen 

Hyman C&> Lipman 



1449 FILLMORE STREET 













'I III II fliMllit 1! 

Ill . Iian-r li^'lil ; 

ml lontls 

> m>t tin' f«ll>>» brown, 
Spring *t<-n<l nfiir: 
l>ii| not the sun go down, 

I luniks Ih' for shame tlmi whipe 

On t<> emprise : 
Thanks !«• for pain that strips 

Sell of disgv 
Through the quiet, common chord 

Overtones thrill : 
In tin' seed dropped abroad, 

June liveth still. 

Thanks In' for 1 i f»- that lives 

Stronger through strife : 
Thanks !»■ for death thai e 

Ending to life. 
Song of the silence born, 

Freedom of thrall. 
Spirit from fli-sli outworn — 

Thanks be for all. 
— Von ToAsel Snl/ilit'it in Harper's 
Monthhi. 



THE ORATORY. 
Still in the vaulted temple of my hearl 
There is an oratory thine alone — 
A sweet, hushed, sacred chantry all 

thine own. 
There do T By when 1 would be apart 
To dream and dream, for there I know 

thou art 

Allicit I see tlico not. There is thy 

throne : 
Then- art thou crowned, and as at 
altar-stone 
Pain would I kneel and let the day depart. 
While this remains T cannot lose thee 
dear. 
Though countless centuries between us 
roll- 
Though earth dissolves, and planets 
disappear, 
And all the splendor of the starry scroll 
Dies out of Heaven, what room is there 
for fear? 
Love still shall answer love, soul call 

to soul ! 
— Julia G. B. Dorr in Harper's Month- 
ly Magazine. 



We Recommend 



GEORGE MAYER.LE 



German 
Skill, knowh 
succcus. M 



ptfcfcfl, now at 1115 GOLDEN OATK AVENUE. H.n O. 
' y years of practical experience are powerful factors to hi 
Water 50 cts... by mail 65 eta. Mayerle'n Antiseptic Wipe: 
used when Rla*se* blur, tire or strain the eyes, 2 for 25 cents. Eyes examined free. 



the wood of dreams. 

Here in the Wood of Dreams, be still, be 
still ! 
1 weary of your passion and your 
sighing, 
For I would hear the silent, joyous laugh 
That, mocks all anxious men afraid of 
dying. 
There is a knowledge hid among the trees, 
"Philosophy amid the grasses glistens: 
I think I hear, " There's no such thing as 
death "— 
Be silent — silent! All my spirit 

listens. 
— Georgia Wood Panghorn in Scrib- 
ner's. 



( VACATION 1906. 



=5 % 



J 



ISSUED BY THE 

California Northwestern Railway 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 
AND 

North Shore Railroad 

THE SCENIC ROUTE 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 

Giving full information in regard to 

Camping spots, the location, accommodations, attractions, etc., of mineral 
spring resorts and country homes and farms where summer boarders 
are taken, with terms of board, S7.00 and upwards per week. 



To be had at Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street. San Francisco, 
bring an immediate response. 



Inquiry by mail will 



V 



JAMES AGLER, 

Genera] Manager. 



R. X. R.YAN 
Gen. Pass, and Freight. Agt. 



Santa Fe 

^i w 



Yosemite 
Valley 






via 



The Santa Fe and The New Railway 

The most comfortable way. Only #28.50 for 
the round-trip. Reduced rates at camps and 
hotels. Write for Pamphlet, 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices 

Ferry Building, San Francisco 
1112 Broadway, Oakland 
130 J Street, Sacramento 
23 South First Street, San Jose 
1031 J Street, Fresno 



^ 



J 



:>ts 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900 



. Some indignation is being expressed 
against the Adams brothers of Oakland 
because they will not (Innate land on the 
shons of Lake Merrill for a public park. 
Criticism should be withheld. The ac- 
tions of the Oakland City Council and 
the grave suspicion under which more 
than one of its members lies are quite 
enough to warrant any careful eilizen in 
withholding gifts- at the present time. 

:I: $ * 

The elevating and refining influences 
of the modern higher edueation may be 
observed in the avidity with which our 
fourteen-year-old damsels devour the par- 
ticulars of the Thaw ease. I heard two 
of them in an Oakland street car last 
week discussing the matter with (he great- 
est interest and the most complete fund 
of information. "Gee!" said one of them, 
her pretty blue eyes dilated, and her face 
all a-quiver with excitement, "he must 
have been awl'ullv fond of her." to which 
the more sedate and serious brunette be- 
side her replied conclusively: "Oh, I 
dunno. He looks fool enough to do any- 
thing." With a few more years of this 
reading and training these two girls 

should make excellent wives and mothers. 

* * * 

" How to write a sucirssl'ul hook" is 
a subject which has been agitating the 
infirm and the debutantes of a certain 
Oakland club. Still, in spite of all their 
discussions, the real plays old Harry with 
the theoretical. Who, in the name of 
Fate, for example, would ever have con- 
ceived that a successful novel could be 
made out of the canning industry. " But 
it was not a novel," you say. ({ranted, 
my child, but it was successful, ami that 
is all the members of the club are con- 
cerned with. That and the advertise- 
ment. 

* * * 

When a lot of foolish and misinformed 
outsiders libel this community one can 
pity and forgive on the ground of ig- 
norance. Imi when the slander c s from 

people who live here, wrath rises. In 
Oakland, at 366 Ninth St., is an insli- 
tution known as •'The Household Press," 
which prints a paper called " The House- 
hold of God." Also, they print tracts 
saying that it was the wrath of God 
which destroyed San Francisco. The rea- 
son given for this is. that "California has 
repealed all Sabbath laws. The people 
are wholly given up to pleasure-seeking 
and sin. Adultery, drunkenness, gam- 
bling and the theatre are common. God 
and His people are laughed at, and made 
spoil of in the theatres. And sin is at 
home ami welcome in the churches.' 1 

Thai lasl sentence i> written, I sup- 
pose, to forestall the natural question: 
"Why diil God destroy the churches': 
Altogether, the tracts, which are being 
distributed wholesale, are vile slanders. 
They foul the nest that the proprietors 
of this "Household Press" inhabit. 

* * * 

The latest joke is: "Oakland was vac- 
cinated for a large city, hut it didn't 
take." The reason is not far to seek. 
Any one who has ever tried to buy any- 



thing at Oakland stores will understand 
why it has never reached metropolitan 
distinction. Whether one wants men's or 
women's clothing, with the exception of 
one or tun places, the result is the same. 
The shops show lack of variety, old styles 
and high prices. The consequence is, 
linn people are going to San Francisco 
to do their shopping. It is good for San 
Francisco, but very bad for Oakland. Ami 
there is no excuse for it. ({nods can be 
landed there just as cheaply as at San 
Francisco, ami the lack of them shows an 
absence of enterprising spirit. 

It is the same with the Oakland res- 
taurants. None of Ibein approach in 
quality those that Sail Francisco had be- 
fore the lire. Yet the prices are extor- 
tionately high. When it comes to the or- 
dinary luncheon place, ibe restaurant in- 
to which one rushes with only half an 
hour to spare, they are unspeakably bad. 
The chop-houses are all conducted by 
Slavonians, ami they are unspeakabl] 
filthy. San Francisco was noted for 
places in the wholesale district where. In 
a quarter, one could gel a -teak — and a 
good one — chops or an entree, with a bot- 
tle of beer or a glass of wine. The price 
for the same thing is nearly double in 
Oakland, and the service is vile. There 
is not one of them but has table cloths 
that are black, streaked, spotted, mottled 
and bedaubed with the drippings of many- 
meals. The waiters' clothing is just as 
dirty, their appearance unkempt and dis- 
gusting. This is not an exaggeration. 
The Oakland Board of Health should 
look after these places, Any one knows 
that the dining room of a restaurant is 
cleaner than its kitchen. On this hy- 
pothesis, the kitchens of Oakland's chop- 
houses must be pig-sties. 



The development of the suburban towns 
during the ne\i leu years will be inter- 
esting. San Francisco will, most likely, 
be lacking in big apartment houses — peo- 
ple win, slepi in them the morning of 
April 18th will be shy of living in upper 
stories. They will hunt for suburban 
places, where they will'be able to have 
a one or two story house with a plol of 
ground. Already it is impossible to se- 
cure a house in Alameda. Oakland or Ber- 
keley, despite Ibe building that is going 
on. There will he an all-night service 

and an increased number of lines across 

the bay soon: then we will see Alameda, 
Marin and San Mateo Counties filled 
wilb people. Suburban life has never 
'■en so prevalent here as ii should be. in 
spile of ib,. facl thai no more beautiful 
country exists than surrounds San Fran- 
cisco. The hills back of Oakland and 
Berkeley, the Fruitvale foothills, the oak 
tracts and the bay shore of Alameda, and 
grandly beautiful Mill Valley, are ideal 

in situation, w ith a superb climate. Marin 
is a beautiful and comparatively unsettled 
county. Xot one-tenth of it ha-- been de- 
veloped from a suburban residence stand- 
point. The same applies in a lesser de- 
gree to San Mateo County, which is sur- 
passingly beautiful, with its w led hills 

and vales, its bay shore and streams. As 
San Francisco grows, so will all this sub- 



urban country — and those who are wise 
will buy big chunks of it. 
• * • 

Oakland is to benefit greatly by the 
changes that have occurred in the Key 
Route management. .Mr. William R. Al- 
berger, the general agent of the Santa 
Fe, has been appointed "eneral traffic 
manager of the San Jose, Oakland and 
San Jose Railway. Mr. W. K. Alberger 
has been connected with the Santa Fe as 
boy ami man for many years, and is ;■ 
man of energy and splendid attainments. 

lb- is one of the besi railroad diploma- 
tists in the countrv, and is a decided ac- 
quisition io ibe executive personnel of 

any railroad. 

* * * 

Tin- authorities of Oakland are hav- 
c- a hard time finding men who want 
io be policemen. Still, the statistics 
show (bat the immigration from Ireland 
is on Ibe increase. .Maybe it's a sense 
of humor that keeps them from wanting 
to gel on the force, for truly an Oakland 
policeman is considerable of a joke. 

Twice Witllill two Weeks burglars ll.'ll ! 

escaped with bullets flying after them. 
A policeman who can't bit a burglar 
on the run is as inefficient as a peace 
guardian as a French duelist would be. 



Dr. H. J. Stewart 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
Special course for angers desiring church ap- 
pointments. 

STUDIO 1925 OCTAVIA ST., 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom 

Tailor 

2415 Fillmore Street,, San Francisco 

Formerly of ihe Mutual Savins, Bank Building. 



Rock Island 
Frisco Lines 



Passenger and Freight Offices 
OAKLAND— 410 Fourteenth Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO— Ferry Station 



F. W. THOMPSON, 
General" Western Agent. 









The Tallac 

L»kc T4ho«. Gal. 



Headquarter* for Rod Fishermen 



M LAWR1NCE & CO.. T.Uac. 



Gs>ttem 



LAKE COUNTY 

Trin to ty by wm, SPIERS' 

SPRING STAGES. 

H u - 
r> linen, and return. $7 

: Qlenbrook 
nnd return, 11:30 

a. m. Sundays ■ alt hour for 

lunch Rt tho now Callstoga Hotel. Fifty pounds 
liajrf?a. 

■■■■■■ 

Del Monte Offers 

During the reconstruction of San Francisco, 
Hotel Del Monte ofters a welcome shelter 
to those desiring a homelike place 
for rest and recreation. The park- 
like grounds, the golf links, the flowers, the 
many walks and drives were never more at- 
tractive than at present. The entire hotel has 
recently been renovated and improved; with 
steam heat, electric lights', hot and cold water, 
telephone in every room. Why not make this 
attractive resort near San Francisco your per- 
manent home? Special terms for families. Ad- 
dress Geo. P. Snell, Manager, Del Monte, Cal. 

A Permanent* Home. 

CKAGGC 

^HOT SPRINGS, SONOMA COUNTY^* 

Only (our and a half hours from San Francisco. As (o the desirabili- 
ty of place I refer to any guest of the past I I years. Information at 
Bryan '< Bureau. 1732 Fillmore St., or of J. F. MULGREW, 

Sicaggs, Cal. 

Klamath Hot Springs 

Klamath Hot Springs is one of the choice places 
in the State for rest, pleasure and comfort. Fish- 
ing is first-class. Rates $2 and $2.50 per day; ap- 
ply for information at the Peck-Judah Co., 414 
Fourteenth St., Oakland; or Edson Bros., Bes- 
wick, Gal. 

Hillside Villa 

Novato, Marin County. 

Good Room and Board One Dollar Per Day. 
Fishing and bathing. Driving, Horse-back rid- 
ing. Six trains daily. Fare 70 cents. Monthly 
tickets, 25 cents Round Trip. Address MRS. 
FARISH, Novato, Marin county. 

Agua Caliente Springs 

frminuui fmmiii. (JJulffnruui. 

Not injured. Better than ever. Rates the same. 

Address 
8. Kirborda, Agua (Saltentr, (Sal. 

Mrs. Mary Page Sheerin 

AFTERNOON TEAS and BANQUETS 

"The Colonial" 

Strictly First-Class 
Phone Main 661. LOS GATOS, CAL. 



thin 

! onrlnn. Ii 
•' Hi' I urn \ ■ .-. •inU-r— hold 
r Pan.' " One ..f I pro- 

(taction* for ii 

will be n new plaj hy II. nn Arthur 
Jones, one ol tin 
dramatists. Mr. Jones is the auth 
"The Liars," "The Masqueradere," and 
other equally well-known plays. His ne\i 
play will have nier on August 

30th tu the Hudson Theatre, New 
When William II. Crane begins bis next 
New York season in September, ii will 
be in :i new play in four acts, by Alfred 
Sutro, author of " The Walls of Jeri- 
cho." The title is " The Price of Money." 
In August, til the Criterion Theatre, New 
York. Charles Frohman makes Ins firsl 
musical production of the season, pre- 
senting Hattie Williams in "The Little 
Cherub." Mr. Frohman will surround 
Miss Williams with a cast of more promi- 
nent e than litis ever been Been in a 
Broadway musical production. Miss Wil- 
liams achieved a great success in "The 
Girl from Kays," and later in "'Flu' Rol- 
licking Girl." She is now abroad, but 
returns shortly for rehearsals. Ben Teal, 
who will stage the play, has cornered the 
Broadway beauty market for this produc- 
tion. 

Following a custom that has existed 
since the opening of the Empire Theatre, 
John Drew will he the first attraction 
of the season at New York's beautiful 
theatre. He will he seen this year in A. 
W. Pinero's play, " His House in Order," 
now the success of the London season. 
Margaret Illington will be Mr. Drew's 

leading lady. 

* * * 

On the occasion of the dedication to 
Pope Pius X of tin' -Ave Maria" com- 
posed in commemoration of the "Cala- 
bria " misfortune, Leoncavallo received 
the following letter from His Holiness: 

"To the Beloved Son, Professor Rug- 
<>-ero Leoncavallo: Heartily praising your 
holy thought, we accept with the highest 
satisfaction the dedication of your Work, 
with the hope that Heaven will answer 
the prayers of the blessed by richly re- 
warding your act of charity, and we give 
you with paternal affection the Apostolic 
Benediction. 
' (Signed) "PITTS PP. X." 



In 



I n I - I am. 

\ i on. erl of much int . meri- 

wns recently given in London at 
■nor Hon-.', under the distinguished 
patronage of the Duchess of Marlborough 
and the Duchess of Westminster, 
spicuous among the performers was 
Ferenes Hegedus, the violin virtuoso, who 
has had phenomenal success in England 
this Beason. Leon Rennay, whose vocal 
equipment is well known, sang a group 
of French songs with purity of voice and 
refinemenl of style. Paris Chambers, the 
American cornetist, played a berceut 
Tsi liaikowsky and Barthelemy'e " Sen 
I loquette " with beautiful tons 

ii ttnique, and Arthur Shat- 
hiek, the gifted American oianist's, inter- 
pretations elicited Well dcscne.l tl]l|lli]llse. 

All of the above named artists will ap- 
pear in the United States and Canada 

during the ensuing concert season. 



Paper of Every Description 

A. ZELLERBAGH & SONS 
405 Jackson St., San Francisco. 



514 Eleventh St. Oakland 
114 K St. Sacramento 



113 N. Los Angeles St. L. A. 
54 First St. Portland, Or. 



Hiram W. Johnson 

Attorney-at-Law 

Has removed his office to 1905 
Webster Street, corner Pine, San 
Francisco. 



Samuel M. Shortridge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1101 O'Farrell Street, corner Franklin Street, 
San Francisco. 



Santa Cruz 

Welcomes all who desire a comfortable and entertaining place 
for themselves or families. 



NEVER. A DULL MOMENT 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTBK. 



July 14, 190U 



US Ill®]msm©s ©if Jona® W@H§]fo 



The life story of Jane Welsh divides 
itself into two parts — a romance and a 
tragedy. The romance is the story of her 
hopeless love for Edward Irving; the 
tragedy, her surrender to the entreaties 
of Thomas Carlyle. In this article we 
deal with the romance. 

What manner of woman, we must lir-a 
ask ourselves, was this Scotch girl who 
lired the hearts of men so remarkable and 
notable as Edward Irving and Thomas 
Carlyle? We have evidence enough to 
convince us that she whose love-tragedy 
lias made her name immortal was by the 
very genius of her personality worthy an 
immortality of a mere illustrious nature. 
She was a girl who stood out from the 
ruck, a woman who dazzled and shone 
with originality and f orcefulness ; per- 
haps one of the most remarkable women 
of modern times. 

She had gypsy blood in her veins, and 

was the only child of a wealth" physician. 
She was pretty, graceful, vivacious. Her 
childhood had been spent in the reckless 
manner of a tomboy. " In Haddington," 

writes one who knew her. " when any one 
saw a young girl perched on a wall they 
said at once. 'That's Dr. Welsh's daugh- 
ter. 5 A long time after her marriage, 
when she could pluck up courage to re- 
turn for the first time to the spot where 
she had been so happy, nobody could rec- 
ognize her. so greatly bad cares, even 
more than years, aged, withered and wast- 
ed her. But a passer-by guessed her name. 
by an instinctive revival of memory, when 
he saw her mount a fence. ' That's Jeanie 
Welsh,' he cried-. ' no other woman would 
climb a wall instead of going through the 
dour. Yes. you're Jeanie Welsh!'" On 
one occasion this vigorous young heirese 
fought a boy with clenched lists, ami 
properly hammered him. She hail a taste 
I'm- walking along the parapets of bridges 
and doing all the innumerable little tricks 
of naughty hoys which agitate the nerves 
of so many excellent parents. 

Yet, with all this. Jeanie Welsh was Ear 
from being a boor. If she bad a taste for 
boys' games, she also bad a will for boys' 
studies. She made people teach her Latin. 
''I want to learn Latin: please let me In' 
a hoy." sbi' once pleaded — and she roused 

herself every morning at live (this fash- 
ionable young lady of Haddington!) to 
learn Euclid and prosecute her studies in 
Latin and Herman. Altogether a very 
real and masterful young woman, a crea- 
ture impatient of drawing-room accom- 
plishments and hunery for kinship with 
the universe. 

You must picture to yourself in the lil- 
tlc social world of that Scotch town, early 
in the nineteenth centurv. a beautiful 
young lady unconsciously touched with 
I lir Greek ideal, and seeking with all the 
Bres in her riotous pulses, albeit inarticu- 
lately, for a larger life and a more delect- 
able freedom. Willi her hair streaming 
in the wind, her eyes kindling;, her el: ieks 
aflame with joyous health, this lovely and 
half-wild young girl would run across 
the moors, leaping brooks and clambering 
over bills, and .".ending out her soul into 



the mists of tin- infinite. For something 
that she could not find in the gentility of 
her mother or in the cheerful boisteroUH- 

ness of her beloved father, this wildling 
hungered with a great hunger, thirsted 
with a great thirst, and to the day of her 
death she went hungry for it. 

Of course she had lovers. A girl so 
beautiful and so untamed, a creature so 
hold and original, could not 1ml attract 
the admiration and desire of the youth 
about her. Ami it is characteristic of her 
that she sometimes fancied herself in love 
with some one of these suitors, even in 
the midst of the satire and scorn where- 
with she was accustomed to mock them. 
Of one of these young men, whom she 
happened to sec one day on the opposite 
bank of a river, the heiress wrote petu- 
lantly: "Let any human being conceive 
a more tantalizing situation! I saw him; 
1 durst not make any effort to attract his 
nttfintion, though, bail my will been con- 
sulted in the matter, to have met him eye 
to eye and soul to soul 1 would have swum 
— aye, swmm across at the risk of being 
dosed in water-gruel for a month to 
come!" And of another she wrote, at dif- 
ferent limes: "Oh, wretch! I wish I 
could hate him. but 1 cannot. . . I had 
not heard his voice for many a day. but 

then I had heard those who had con- 
versed witli him. 1 had seen objects he 
hail looked mi: I had breathed air be had 
breathed. ... I scarcely heard a word 
be said, my own heart beat so loud." Hut 
I In sr were the child's play of love, the 
imagined passion of a girl who haled 

commonplace and a tepid temperament, 

and must he always creating a passion. 

There came one day to Haddington a 
new schoolmaster, a youth still in his 
teens, hut. because of the austerity of 
ll is religious devotion and the fervid 
character id' bis disposition, a man in ap- 
pearance, and a man of the very greatest 

attraction for Jeanie Welsh. This young 
man was Edward Irving, destined to he 
in after years one of Scotland's noblest 
preachers and purest saints — a visionary. 

a dreamer, a seer, a soul always in com- 
munion with the invisible Mysteries. 

He is described to us by all who ever 
knew him as a man id' the most remark- 
able order and blessed with the handsom- 
est appearance. lie was tall and digni- 
fied in carriage, and bis countenance was 
marked with every attribute of beauty. 
Even the " Encyclopedia Br i tardea " 

speaks of his "c nanding stature, the 

admirable symmetry of his form, the dark 
and melancholy beauty of his counte- 
nance." His voice was low and deep, and 
it was bis habit on entering a poor man's 
cottage lo doff bis hat ami lift his hand. 
exclaiming: " Peace be on this house." 
He gave even the most flippant an im- 
pression of some spiritual superiority, 
and as for the more imaginative, they fell 
that lie was sureh in psychical communi- 
cation with the spirits Of the world in- 
visible. He was. in a word, a beautiful- 
looking and a very noble-mannered mys- 
tic—a saint acquainted with the Myster- 
ies. 



It fell to the lot of Edward Irving to 
instruct Jeanie Welsh in Latin, and al- 
inosi immediately these two remarkable 
voung people were aware of heart-stir- 
rings which meant something infinitely 
more wonderful than a platonie sympa- 
thy. The very dissimilarity of their per- 
sonalities fascinated both the youth and 
I In girl. He was of the cloister, accus- 
loiiiiil to meditation and surrender id' 
spirit : she, of the mountain and the moor 
and impatient of all restraint. Often he 
rebuked her for a stinging sarcasm or for 
contemptuous raillery, hut in his heart 
was only love for the brilliant and lovely 
eliild who stood upon the threshold of 
life. 

For her it was happiness of the purest 
kind to feel herself in love with this mel- 
ancholy young giant. Beneath the man's 
cold exterior, bis ascetic countenance, ami 

his austerity of manner there was a lire 
fierce enough to consume cities; and — 
it is important to remember this — it was 
for tire for passion and ardor and ec- 
stasy that the soul of Jeanie Welsh was 
crying all her life. To love this man 
was delicious, to contemplate the prospect 
of union with him an intoxication ; at last 
the gods had blessed her, and revealed life 
as a tiling altogether good and greatly to 

he desired. 

But, though none the less ardently than 
she did be love, for the man this new pas- 
sion in bis heart was a madness and a 
fury — nay. a torment. For be was al- 
ready engaged lo he married ! 

For weeks, for months, he kept (he 
frightful truth from Jeanie Welsh, and 
only to the Cod in whose service his life 
was to be spent did be pour out the horror 
and the agony of his situation. Think 
what that situation was. lie found him- 
self almost daily in the society of a woman 
whom be adored. a woman who 
was his intellectual equal, a woman 
whom be felt with all the depth of his 
splendid character lo be the only possible 
partner of his soul's travail ; and he was 
hound by the honor of a thoughtless, boy- 
ish vow to a girl whose personality paled 
before that of the brilliant and beautiful 
Jeanie Welsh, even as a candle dies in the 
sunshine. 

Crying did the noble thing we should 



CHAS.MEINECKE 
& COMPANY 

Importers 



Temporary Offices: 

1003 1-2 BROADWAY ROOM 15 

OAKLAND 






SAN II.W IKK 



I him thai 

thai whi 

irould 

lo\iT 

Imnj: li.i'i 

• ill an. I 11 proud 

hut tin- linrinr of hid 

■ulil not ' 1. Irving 

I his lii-ad ti> I ho Jane 

i wviit out into tin- wilderncM and 

clenched 

jle, petty and 
temptible fnllir* which we are content to 
ii>rni[>t the grand flow of human 
iv ! If over t«i> |>i"|>lr were marked 
mit fur union it was this twain — the fiery, 
tameless, healthy and beautiful young 
hedonist and the pun' ami saintly and 

She needed lii- 
he, ln>r healthy trri |> mi living facts. Ills 
spirituality would have purified tin' re- 
bellion in her heart, and her human wis- 
dom would have kept in check the impul- 
sive forces of his spiritual delirium. 
Above and beyond all else, they loved each 
other with the primeval passion of man 
ami woman. Ami they were driven 
asunder by a conventional interpretation 

of honor. 

When lio liail gone from Haddington 
In- yet hoped that God would intervene 
ami save his heart alive. It seemed to 
him that Heaven could not thwart so 
proud a passion, so tremendous an emo- 
tion. Something would happen. So he 
walked over at intervals to Haddington, 
and sat in the same room with his beloved 
and listened to her voice — and hoped. 

And there came a day when he en- 
treated a new friend of his to tro with him 
over the holds to Haddington, a young 
man of marvelous character and rough, 
shepherd-like beauty, a youthful pro- 
phet with unhandselled hair, dark violet 
eyeff, and a voice that had the rolling 
tone of thunder, a man with a future — 
Thomas Carlyle. 

" We walked cheerily together," says 
( 'ml vie, "not always by the highway, but 
meandering at our will pleasantly and 
multifariously talking. . . . and about 
sunset of the same day I first saw her 
who was to be so important to me thence- 
forth ; a red, dusky evening, the sky hang- 
ing huge and high, but dim as with dust 
or drought, over Irving and me." 

" Irving and me !" 

Little did he guess how the girl who 
was to be so important to him thence- 
forth sought the eyes of Irving at that 
meeting and at every other meeting after, 
and how, in the midst of all his mag- 
nificent talking, the woman's heart was 
crying out in the breast of her to be loved 
by the silent priest ! He was caught by 
her beauty and by her cleverness; but love 
her ! feel passion for her ! Nay, there 
was no fire of love in his rugged heart, 
and in his soul no capacity for passion. 
He was the man of letters, the dealer in 
words, the architect of phrases . He 
could build you a passion out of letters, 
and from words construct you an emo- 
tion; but to experience those blinding 
and buffeting waves of feeling, those fiery 
and passionate flames of love — these were 



imt for th 

•inn- 
» inl lr\ ■ 

lie did imt love. 
•• Whether if they Inn! married," uy* Mr, 
inor, " the lot •■! either would have 
happy, wh Hut tin 

one or two llm>_ ne , ;in -u . 

Mill thai In in.' 

ami Jane Welsh could not have done 

than they actually did. The) 
each driven into a lovelorn marriage; and 
whatever element may !»• wanting in h 
marriage, and vet allow it to lie tolerable, 
the absence of love is nearly always < I i -^i -- 
trous "ith -in h natures as these two had 
.... I don't know which of the two 
• me must regard as having ended more 
calamitously — Irving's life-struggle 
heart-weariness going out in mere insan- 
ity after the delirious ravings of popular- 
ity, preachings and u>ion>. or Jane 
Welsh's long heart-ache, finding relief 
ami real for the first time when the ache 
finally broke I he heart. 

Of the hitter's plight the reader .- 1 1 : 1 1! 
judge for himself in the story of the 
tragedy of Jane Welsh, which we slcill lay 
before him in our ne\l article. — Tid-Bits. 



PASTEI.S OF THE 

SAN FRANCISCO FIRE. 
Mr. Charles Dormon Robinson, whose 
illustrations (one of them reproduced in 
color from the original pastel ) of the San 
Francisco (ire will appear in the August 
Century, has seen bis home city burn tour 
times. He was in the fires of 1851, 1853 
and 1854, as well as in (he much greater 
catastrophe of lflOfi. Mr. Robinson suc- 
ceeded in making a painting of the recent 
fire when it was at its greatest height, on 
Thursday night, from eleven to three in 
the morning. Tie painted thirteen pastels 
also, several of which the August Century 
will reproduce. 



SPEED AND COMFORT. 
The citizen of San Francisco who has 
elected residence at the Hotel Rafael for 
the summer has found it so agreeable that 
the stay will be lengthened far into the 
fall months. The splendid cuisine, the 
comfort and fine service at this hostelry, 
coupled with a fine train service to the 
metropolis, have made (lie conditions so 
agreeable many will remain , indefinitely. 



STARTS WITH A VIM. 
The Vienna Bakery at 1226 Post street 
has easily earned the patronage of shop- 
pers. The three large dining rooms, on 
the first floor of this building, were well 
patronized by an increasing crowd for 
every day of the past week. The predic- 
tion that the new location would prove 
a popular one, and that the name of the 
Vienna Cafe, and the added fact, that 
Mr. F. B. (ialindo is the proprietor, 
would draw like a magnet, has come true. 
Remember the place — 1226 Post street. 



See Spences 



Invisible, neatest eyeglass in the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL CO. 
1315 Golden Cute Avenue at Fillmore 



CHINN-BERETTA OPTICAL COMPANY 



Have Located at 



1821 Fillmore Street 

Between Bush and Sutter Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 



OAKLAND OFFICE 466 13TH STREET 



One Paper City 

Oakland, population 105,000. Suburbs 
75,000, has one great evening newspaper, 

The Tribune 

Exclusive Associated Press Dispatches. 
Inside political news. All the society 
news. 14 to 26 pages each day. 



FOR CONVENIENCE, 
always have a supply of Borden's Eagle Brand 
Condensed Milk on hand. Suitable for all house- 
hold purposes. For puddings, cake and all kinds 
of desserts. Send for Recipe Book, 108 Hudson 
street, New York. 



MURPHY GRANT & GO. 

Wholesale and Dry Goods 

8th and Franklin Streets, - - Oakland, Cal. 

New goods constantly arriving and oh sale 
at our temporary quarters, Eight and Franklin 
Streets, Oakland, Cal. 

The erection of a new steel structure will im- 
mediately be commenced on our old site, Bush 
and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 

W. and J. SLOANE & GO, 

Temporary offices: 
1730 Pacific Ave., San Francisco Cor.14th and Franklin Sts.,Oakland 

Absolutely the Best French Laundry Work 

AT MODERATE PRICES 

E. CANDEVAN, 
192S Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone West 1901 

THE CALIFORNIA DOOR COMPANY 

DOORS— WINDOWS 

16th Street Station, Oakland 



,'30 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900 



TEi 



m. 



Ste 



urns t© m 



The announcement that John ,1. Burke, 
the clerk for Snook & Church, is a can- 
didate Tor Senator from the Sixteenth 
District in opposition to Frank Leavitt 
and Philip M. Walsh, is not as astonish- 
ing as some of the political wiseacres on 
the daily papers seem to think it is. Like 
most political stories, il has many rami- 
Rcations, and is but the side play in a 
much deeper game than a State Senator- 
ship. Leavitt, who is and always has 

I n. Tom Williams's man. and whose 

only reason for being in the Senate is to 
kill any hills that may come up to pro- 
led the youth of the Stall' from the per- 
nicious influence of Williams's gambling 
resort, alias the Emeryville rare liar . 
was opposed to the (ioyernor, during the 
last two sessions of the Legislature. He 
was opposed to Pardee because Pardee 
favored several bills which proposed to 
limit racing and pool-selling in this Stale. 
and because il was known that it the hills 
ever reached the executive chamber the 
Governor would sign them. The Gov- 
ernor added fuel to the fire when he ap- 
pointed the trustees lo the Blind Asylum 
at Berkeley and left Leavitt off the 
Board, though he re-appointed Matto3, 
his colleague from, the other end of the 
county, and Leavitt then and there de- 
clared war on "Pardee, and went home 
rowing vengeance. But for various rea- 
sons, it looks as though Pardee would be 
able to defeat the Williams gang this 
year, and as the same delegates as those 
who go to the State convention will nomi- 
nate State Senators, it follows that if 
Pardee controls the delegates from the 
Sixteenth District, he will he able to de- 
feat the nomination of Leavitt. as well 
is secure those votes for himself. As 
there is a great deal of opposition to Lca— 
vitt, even in Emeryville, for the reason 
that there is a great deal of opposition 
to his master, Williams, since (hat part 
of the city lias settled up with respect- 
able people, and race track touts and 
jockeys no longer control the elections 
there absolutely, the chances id' his defeal 
are very strong. That, of course, would 
mean not only the defeat of Leavitt, but 
it would mean also the nomination of a 
Senator who is favorable to Pardee, and 
that is why Phil Walsh is in the light. 

Walsh is the law partner of District 
Attorney Allen, his chief deputy, has 
been several times to (he Legislature, and 
would have been Speaker of (he last ses- 
sion had not the Governor made a per- 
sonal fight against him. The District 

Attorney and Assessor Dallon are not the 
best of friends. Why, is another story 
(hat need not lie (old now. Dalton had 
a scheme — I believe still has — by which 
he is allowed a large sum of money in 
the lump for deputies, and according to 
Walsh, he is able to add to his revenues 
about sfS.ooo to $10,0110 a year by having 
the work for which the money is appro- 
priated done for that much less than the 
county allows him. Walsh in the session 
of 1903 advocated a hill that the Asses- 
sor should only he allowed I he exact sum 
which he expends, and that lie should 



furnish vouchers for his expenditures. Hi 1 
made a long speech on the subject, which 
attracted much attention, and would have 
passed the bill had it not been for the 
Governor, who is a personal friend of 
Dallon's. and who used his influence to 
kill the measure, besides getting very an- 
gry with Walsh fur his speech and advo- 
cacy of the hill. When. then. Iwo years 

ago, ii had been decided to .civ,' Walsh 

the Speakership, Pardee sent for Walsh 
hi Sacramento, telephoned him to come 
up, in fact, and told him that he could 
not he speaker, for the reason lhal he 
t Walsh) was not in the Governor's opin- 
ion "a safe man." Walsh took his 
medicine like a man, went to Sacra- 
mento and remained very quiet during 
I he session, though losing no opportunity 
in Knock the Governor whenever the op- 
portunity offered. Seeing that Leavitt 
lias no chance to secure the delegation to 
the State convention, and to he nomi- 
naieil for Senator again because of the 

Tom Williams incubus. Walsh has an- 
nounced his candidacy, so thai if Pardee 
should be renominated Governor he will 
he in the Senate all his 1,1111 to annoy 
hini, and if the Governor he not renomi- 
nated, then he can oppose him if His Ex- 
cellency comes up as a candidate for 
Senator against Perkins two vears hence, 
which is his private intention. As Walsh 
and Leavitt both belong to the anti-Par- 
dee faction, il would appear that there 
is a split in that section of the party — 

though it is v apparent than real, as 

if Leavitt 1 Id get the nomination 

Walsh would not he a candidate — and 
that has given the Pardeeites the oppor- 
tunity they have been waiting for, to 

name a Senator of their own, hence tin' 
candidacy of Johnnie Burke. 
* * * 

John .1. Burke is (he clerk in the of- 
fice of Church & Snook, and Snook is 



the principal advisor of the Governor. 
forming with (he Code Commissioner 
Davis, Private Secretary Noyes and 
Charlie Spear, the Governor's kitchen 
cabinet. Burke was in the last Legisla- 
ture, as an Assemblyman, lie was noted 
as the best-dressed man in (he Legisla- 
ture, was very popular with the women 
who admire a good physique, and voted 
as lie was told, and when he was told, 

leaving the Legislative halls to take care 
of themselves whenever he had no direc- 
tions io carry out. If (he Sixteenth 
Senatorial delegates should he favorable 
lo Pardee he will lie nominated, and 
Pardee will have a Senator whose 
vote he can control as completely as Tom 
Williams does that of Leavitt. or the cor- 
porations (hat of Corey Pendleton. More 
than that, Church & Snook will have 1 
vote they can control in the Senatorial 
election of Pins, and as that promises 
(o he a warm light, even one vote is no( 
io he despise.]. The idea of owning 
Senators is getting very popular in this 
Stale, especially since Hucf put his clerk 
Kean in the upper house of the Legisla- 
ture, and il will not be long before the 
Senate will he. if the present programme 
continues, not a cluh of millionaires like 
ils namesake in Washington, hut a re- 
union of lawyers' clerks. 

The very small registration in San 
Francisco means that the power of Abe 
Ruef lias been broken, and that he will 
not he the potential luminary at the next 
state convention thai lie had hoped. By 

excluding the dwellers in tents from the 
right to vote at the primaries, thousands 

of voles were lost to Bind', because it is 
largely those who are living in the camps 
that were his followers in the past. What 
is more significant, however, is the fact 
that (he Election Commissioners who 
are completely under the control of the 
city administration, should have passed 
such a regulation. Is it not another sign 
that Schmitz has definitely broken away 



Country Life 

Means health to mind and body 

SAN MATEO PARK 

Big villa lots, 100 foot front, $700. 

HAYWAKD PARK 

Close to the Hayward home with its magnificent 
grounds, 60 foot lots $1100. 

HAYWARD ADDITION 

Near the village, near electric and steam cars, 50 
foot lots, $900. 

Street work, sewers and water. Come to San Mateo today 

FRANK S. GRUMMON, San Mateo Agent 

Baldwin C&> Howell 

1692 Fillmore street 









BANKING 



BANKING 



Tit Caiiiiii Bilk ol Coaacrce 



<CAD OFFICE— TORONTO 






xrson an.l 

nrlncl- 

! 

- 

I.M Smith's 

Ltd. 

CHICAGO— Tho First Nntionril 

'. NEW ORLEANS— The Commer- 

N ' •nnl Rank. 
San Francisco Office— 325 California Street. 
A. Kiiinp B rle&thOOte, Assist- 

ant Man 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscribed Caj .000 

Paid-up Capital. 
Reserve Fund, $1,200,000 

1IKAP OFFICE 40 Thn-n-lneedle St, Lon- 
don, i;. C. 

Agents — New York— Agency of the London, 
Parts and American Bank. Limited. No. 10 
Wall st root. X. Y; Paris — Messrs. Lazard 
Freres Cie. 17 Boulevard Poissonier. Draw 
direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. 
GREEN, Sub-Manager; R. ALTSCHUL, Cash- 
ier. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building ai 710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 300.000 

Surplus 320.000 

Deposits. January 1. 1906 10,213,801 

James D. Phelan, President; S. G. Murphy, 
Vice-President; James A. Hooper, Vice-Presid 
ent; George A. Story, Cashier; C. B. Hobson, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, 
John A. Hooper, James Moffltt, Frank J. Sul- 
livan. Robert McElroy, Rudoiph Spreckels, Jas. 
M. McDonald. Charles Hoibrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on ap- 
proved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, 
Fargo & Co. , or exchange on city banks. 



Security Savings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 500,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 280,000 

Banking by mail a specialty 

Directors — William Babcock, S. L. Abbott, 
O. D. Baldwin, Jos. D. Grant, E. J. McCut- 
chen, L. F. Monteagle, R. H. Pease, Warren 
D. Clark, James L. Flood, J. A. Donohoe, John 
Parrott, Jacob Stern. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. 

Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $700,000 
The bank transacts a general banking busi- 
ness, sells drafts, makes telegraphic transfers, 
and issues letters of credit available through- 
out the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILENTHAL, 

Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $2,552,719.61 
Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1 .000,000.00 

Deposits June 30. 1906 $38,476,520.22 

F. Tillmann, Jr., President; Daniel Meyer, First Vice President; 

Emi! Rohle, Second Vice President; A. H. R. Schmidt. Cashier; 

William Herrmann, asst. Cashier; George Tourny, Secretary; A.H. 

Muller, asst. Secretary; W. S. Goodfellow, General Attorney. 
Directors--F. Tillmann, Jr'; Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 

Steinhart, I. N. "Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. 

Kruse, W. S. Goodfellow. 



in fa> ' 






I ( ' HOUR PI 

if] it »ill nltound in hi 
and avion. 

Tlii' una wiili b 

room, in the basement There 
iron and m li\ in:: room, 
and the whole nrninjfoment <>f bedrooms 
and bathrooms nrr riorfeel in plan. There 

beautiful view from the porch 
thr mansion. 



The Tectum Tavern, under the 

able management of Mr. Morrison, is now 
ling the ideal lunching place and 
dining salon in San Francisco. Thr high 
i lass service enjoyed in the \mM lit 
Techau's is fasi reclaiming old cue 
era and creating new ours. Ii is ideally 
located al 1321 Sutter Btreetj and being 
handy to Van Ness avenue, which is 
be oming one of the great arterie 
tlic fashionable retail trade of San Fran- 
cisco, will soon bring it into the foremosi 
poistion. 



Statement of the Condition 

OF THE 

SCANDINAVIAN-AMERICAN 
SAVINGS BANK 

Chronicle Building, San Francisco, at 
the close of business June 30, 1906. 



STATEMENT, JUKE 30, 1906 
RESOURCES. 
Loans on collateral 
Loans on real estate 
Bonds - 

Furniture and Fixtures - 
Cash on hand and due from banks 

Total - 



Capital Stock 
Undivided profits 
Due depositors - 

Total 



LIABILITIES 



$572,731.31 
218.713.20 

- 251. 987. 50 
2,000.00 

- 276.385.51 

$1,321,817.52 



$ 300.000.00 

20.496.37 

1,001,321.15 

$1,321,817.52 



LEWIS I. COWGILL, 

Vice President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Columbus Savings & Loan Society 

Cornet Montgomery mid Wiiniiinjrti.ii Streets, 

For tin.* half yenr ending Juno 80, mors, n divlcond litis noon <Jc- 
olftrcd at the rate ol three and six-tontni pi fl-lO] per rent per annum 
on nil deposit*., froc of. taxes, payable on and alter MOHDAY, -Inly 3, 
Jllllli. Dividend!* imt culled fur nro added In ami bear the Baine rntoof 
[ntoresl M tho principal fr»in July 1. lttwi. 

F. N. BELGRANO. Cashier. I. W. HELLMAN.Jr,, President 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

Get the Habit 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marvel at the results. The "Argus" has 
many eyes, you only two, so let us do the work for you. Send 
five dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spongier, Director 

352 Third Ave. - - - New York City 



The French Siriip Bank 












Central Trust Company ot California 

42 Montgomery St.. Corner Sutter. 
Iillnl mi,! 

lltiKn Inter 



Member Stock 

and Bond Exchange. 

J. C. Wilson 

BROKER 

STOCKS and BONDS. INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 

Telephone Temporary 815 KOHL BUILDING 



New York— Phone Call 3177 Broad. 

E, F, Hutton & Go,, Bankers 

Members New York Stock Exchange, New 
York Coffee Exchange, New York Cotton 
Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade. 
33-35 New St., Branch 547 Fifth 
Ave., NEW YORK. 
PRIVATE WIRE. 
Richard E. Mulcahy, Manager. 
490 California Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
424 Tenth Street. Oakland, Cal. 

J. Barth & Co. 

2295 Franklin Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

STOCKS AND BONDS 

INFORMATION ON ALL INVESTMENT 

SECURITIES 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San 
Francisco, California. Location of works. Gold 
Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of 
the Board of Directors, held on the 12th day 
of June, 1906, an assessment (No. SI) of ten 
(10) cents per share was levied uoon the capi- 
tal stock of the corporation, payable immedi- 
ately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at the office of the company, room 91!) 
Kohl Building, northeast corner California and 
Montgomery streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 

18TH DAT OF JULY, 1906, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at 
public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 8th 
day of August, 1906, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the cost of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

P. E. DIETZ, Secretary. 

Office— Room 910 Kohl Building, northeast 
corner California and Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 



/ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1-1, 190d 



OTfltaM 



it- 



Modern. 

They were about 1" take s er 

boarders. r l lie woman, for tin- eternal 
feminine will nol down, could noi forego 
n touch of sentiment, and she was writing 
out a rustic sign, which slu' proposed 
nailing up by the well : 

•• The ol 1 oaken bucket, 

The iron-bound bucket, 

Thi " 

But here her hand faltered. "There's 
no moss on our bucket," she said, look- 
ing very blank. The man seized the 
crayon, and with a bold Sourish, finished 
the verse: 

■■ * * sterilized bucket 

That hangs in the well." 
"That's more up to date, anyway," he 
said. — Puck. 

The Usual Thing. 

"Oh, dear," she said, after the musi? 
cale. " I am so mortified that I don'; 
know what to do. 1 can't imagine what 
caused my voice to break as it did. It 
never happened before. What must Mrs. 
Waddington's guests think of me? How 
can I ever explain it!'" " Don't mention 
it," his friend advised. " They were all 
so husy talking while von sang that proh- 
ably nobody noticed it." — Chicago Rec- 

itnl-IIrrnhl. 

Willing Mike. 

Mrs. Corrigan — A stroike, if it? Well, 
thin, begorry, yez kin hilp me wid me 

washing. Mr. Conigan — Av cooise Oi 

will, darlint. If the tub breaks down, I'll 
fix it for yez. — Puck. 

The Right Kind of a Parrot. 

Mrs. Bacon (who owns a parrot) — I 

see Mine. 1'alti. the songstress, is fond of 

birds, ami recently, in New York, she 
gave $1,000 for a parrot. Mrs. Barton 
[who loves other things besides parrots) 

— Well, if it was a dead parrot, il was 
worth it! — Yonhers Statesman. 

Sensational Cables. 

" What's the news this morning?" 
"Mighty exciting cable about Rockefel- 
ler." - What's that ?" " Why, he goes to 
bed every night, gels up each morning. 
converses with his friends, eats when he 
is hungry, drinks if thirst v. and hasn't 
tipped a waiter yet." — Philadelphia Led- 
ger. 

Little Drops. 

Little drops of waste at, 

Boracic acid tanned. 

Make i lie pot ted chicken 

Or other stuff that's canned. 

— .1 mrrii mi Spectator. 

The Politician. 

"A politician should strive to be a rep- 
resentative man." "Certainly," answered 
Senator Sorghum. "The question is, 
whether you are going to represent the 
public or the boss. — Washington Star. 

He Was. 

Kthol--Think of his being a footpad! 
lie looked jnsi like a real foreign noble- 
n: in. Esther — What did he rob you of? 
Kthel — Kvervlhing I hail. Esther — 
'I In -I i I guess he « as. — Judge. 



NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

Montpelier, Vermont. 

G. M. STOLP & SON, General Manager 



"\ 



Temporary office now located at 801 Union Savings Bank building, Oakland, Gal., 
where all communications regarding extensions, lost policies, etc. should be addressed. ,,, 



/ ^ 

California Insurance Company 

Of San Francisco 

Head Office (after June 1st), - No. 230 California St., S.F. 

Time for giving notice of loss or filing proofs will be extended 
on request. Our adjusters will make up proofs of all losses 
adjusted without expense to claimants. 

M. A. NEWELL, President. 
GEO. W. BROOKS, Secretary. 



Notice 



Mortgagors of HIBERNIA BANK who have not yet 
made their proofs of loss at the Bank please call 
immediately and do so. 

The Hibernia Savings and LoanSociety 

By R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



Cash Capital, (200,000. Cash Assets, 1639,542.2$ 

Pacific Coast Casualty Go. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability. Teams, 
Elevators, Workmen's Collective, Vessels, Bur- 
glary, 1 'bit-' Glass Insurance. 

Officers- Bdmund F. Green, President; John 
C. Coleman, Vice-President; F. a. Zane, Secre- 
tarv; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deer- 
'iinscl. 

I 'ireetors — A. Borel, BT. E. Eothin. Edward 
L. Bray ton. .John C .Coleman, F. P. Deering. 
E. F. Green, I. W. i loll man. .Jr.. George A. 
Pope, Hf-nrv Rost-nfcld. Artmpli A. S«>n. William 

s. Tevle. 

Temporary "tti. ■'. L'. , ;l , I (May St.. San Era n risen. 
Marshal A. Frank Company, General Agents 
for California. 

Kohl Building, San Francisco. 



The Home Insurance Co., New York 



Capital 
Gross Cash Anels 



-$3,000,000 
$21,239,052.82 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and 
tempo ran sojourners anywhere in United 
States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against 
loss bj Are, lightning, wind storm or tornado. 
Indemnity For loss of rental Income by fire or 
lightning 

II. L. ROFF, General Agent. 

GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 

Temporary office, 466 Tenth St., Oakland. 



W. R. GRACE & CO. 

Importers of cement 

and Structural Steel 

TEMPORARY OFFICE 

NEW TRIBUNE BUILDING 

8th Street Oakland 

J. D, Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and commission merchants 
General Agents 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

(Standard Portland Cement.) 

OCEANIC DOCK 

Also temporary office 1112 Broadway, 

Oakland. 

Smiths Gash Store 

Mutual and co-operative. Now No 16 Steu 
art Street, San Francisco, jus! around the cor- 
ner from the old location. First store on city- 
front to resume Mail Orders exclusively. 




«»* r " ANe, »eo 

Newsletter 

(fodifarnia AiVbxvtxsjcr. 

fni /'. Marriott. I' 



■ *" 




VOL. LXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., July 21, 1906. 



No. 3 



-rlMW iltiwh 1111. M- 

- nf'tr »!• n n.»J- »» fMa 

•» «4tw* Miter ntfnl-l fur p*Uir*< 

'••»ta«w.U.«-f (Mil'.- -nirn 

Announcement 

The Business Office of the NEWS LETTER is located at 1121 
Laguna Street, San Francisco. Address all communications 
to the Editorial rooms, 905 Lincoln Avenue, Alameda, tem- 
porary office. Telephone Alameda 1131. 

Don't make it a corrugated iron town. 

" It is a lie — my administration is pure, clean and 

able." (Vociferous applause by Ruef.) 

In divorcing itself from Boni. French politics 

filed no suit. It just worked its right foot. 

Now is the time for all good people in San Fran- 
cisco to butt in, and ask the gang pointed questions. 

Roosevelt was not delighted to be invited to the 

Bryan banquet. He got mad and told them to go to 
h- — ! 

The old political song, " We are Hungry," will 

soon be heard in the land from the dry throats of the 
outs. 

Dirt is flying in the streets. There is no doubt 

about that, but shovels and picks are not the cause of 
all of it. 

Unless they go to buying ranches and sky-scrapers, 

the refugee fund should last the boys for two or three 
years yet. 

The " Holy Roller " business is getting to the 

point where the whole gang should be rolled out of this 
world on the rope route. 

Phoenix seems to be a private snap these days. 

Anyway, that is the kind of a bird that is climbing out 
of San Francisco's ashes. 

The packers should find some comfort in the Euro- 
pean, assertion that the American cigarette is rather worse 
than Chicago canned meat. 

There is no occasion to worry about beating Bryan. 

He will not be a candidate for anything outside of Ne- 
braska, which will be a purely local affair. 

Bryan never will forgive Roosevelt for discovering 

that canned meat or for tackling the oil trust. Pie wanted 
to work them up into pyrotechnics for his own show. 

Democrats should get it straight in their heads 

that Jefferson stood for a tariff schedule that would give 
the country ample revenue, but not destroy competition. 

Let us quit chiding Congress for doing nothing. 

The official exhibit of the reporters of the last session 
show that 20,000,000 words were flung to the breeze. 
However, the nation could have spared 19,000,000 of them 
without sustaining any real loss. 



As a chestnut puller— well, just ask Ruef if 

Schmitc is nol an expert at the busii 

i;™1> games are getting to be bo numerous in San 

Francisco official circles thai the gang lias to number them 
to prevent confusion and intermixii 

Depew is going abroad for his health. It' he had 

not gone abroad so much al home his reputation would 
need fewer and his health would be first class. 

1 jo stuck on a revision of the tariff that re- 

- -. that hope is rising in the Democratic breast that 
the State will resume wheTe she left off fifty-five years 
ago. 

Boston wants free hides; Milwaukee wants 

beer; Kentucky wants Eree whiskey, and San Francisco 

wants free lumber. Yes. the tariff questi - a local 

affair. 

The one suspender and straw hat spell-binder may 

be Been all over the rural districts. If he gets it, he will 
dress up and come to the city for a "much-needed rest." 

They all do it that way. 

Give the Northwest winds time and (bey will blow 

down all the walls and other monuments of the calamity, 
but why wait for the winds? .lump in and do things, 
Messrs. Property Owners. 

Patterson, N. J., is getting heartily tired of her 

colony of anarchists, and Pittsburg is saying the same 
thing about her colony of millionaires. Merely a difference 
of cash in hand, it would seem. 

Perhaps the reason the Senate persistently refuses 

to set aside the petrified forest of xVrizona as a Govern- 
ment reservation is because it feels that any reference to 
the petrified trees is a reflection upon itself. 

Bryan writes from London that he is standing 

pat on free silver and his several other political vagaries, 
which he calls JefEersonian principles, and which are well 
calculated to make Jefferson glad he is dead. 

Manufacturers of headache powders are preparing 

for a big demand after the September nominations. _ Dis- 
appointment and convention corn-juice are conducive to 
pains in and about the place where political sense is 
supposed to dwell. That's the fact. 

The great fire has left a serious problem for the 

Fourth Congressional to solve. Where will enough legal 
voters be found to man the booths? Only smoked walls 
and stately chimneys are permanent residents in the 
hind where Livernash used to gnash his store teeth at 
the bloated corporations. By the way, did Livernash 
survive the 'quake? 

There are some things that some people cannot 

lose. For instance, there is Count Boni. He has lost 
his wife, his income from the Gould estate, and his seat 
in the Chamber of Deputies. But he has his reputation 
for being about the most contemptible two-legged creature 
in France. He holds that by inheritance and by ex- 
pansion of his own efforts. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906. 



WHY JEFFERSONIAN DEMOCRACY? 

Fifty years ago the Republican party was organized, 
and put its first candidate for President in the field — 
General Fremont — only to suffer overwhelming defeat. 
Four years later. Abraham Lincoln led the party to victory, 
but not upon a well-defined set of political principles, 
except the preservation of the union, whose dismember- 
ment seemed imminent. This sentiment, together with 
a divided Democratic and a rapidly growing feeling of 
hostility between the North and the South, gave Mr. Lin- 
coln the majority in the Electoral College, but he fell far 
short id' securing the majority of the popular vote. His 
party coming into power without a clearly defined national 
policy, hut with the chief leaders coming from the de- 
funct Whig party. Mi-. Lincoln himself being a Whig, 
it was lull natural that the Whig theories and philosophy 
of political economy should be the dominating influence 
in the new party. In nearly all respects the new party 
stood upon the foundation which had been laid by the 
Whigs, but the superstructure was constructed by events 
rather than by far-seeing statesmanship. In fact, for 
half a century — all its life — the Republican party has 
been subject to the law of economic evolution and invo- 
lution. But it has had one distinguishing characteristic 
or principle from its birth, which it inherited from its 
Whig ancestors, namely, a protective tariff, a high pro- 
tective tariff, and a prohibitive tariff — a perfectly natural 
evolution. 

Democratic or Jeffersonian principle and ethics of Gov- 
ernment were not, however, altogether eliminated from the 
Republican party's theory of Government until what was 
known as the " MeKinley tariff law" became effective. 
That act was the deliberate abandonment of the funda- 
mental principles of Government as proclaimed and held 
to by Jefferson and Jackson. It was the beginning of 
open and defiant (hiss legislation. That act was the in- 
itiation into the conduct of the Government of a system of 
discrimination and favoritism that should grow in magni- 
tude and expand in compass until the industries of the 
nation and all a\enues leading to them from raw mater- 
ials, and away from them as finished product would be 
owned and controlled by a few. Certainly, the expansion 
of the nation's wealth has been enormous under this 
theory of Government administration, and it is equally 
true that industries have multiplied over and over again, 
and inventive genius encouraged to discover ways to 
cheapen production to seemingly the minimum. It is true, 
also, that meanwhile the wage schedule has gone from 
height to heightj comparatively speaking. Bui what of 
the distribution of this almost immeasurable wealth ac- 
cumulation? The census exhibits show that more of 
this countless increase of the nation's gain has gone to 
the control and absolute ownership of aboui three hundred 
thousand families than to tin- whole of the remaining al- 
most fourteen million families. This, then, is what in 
part the Republican party has accomplished for the 
people as a whole since it turned its back upon Jeffer- 
Bonian principles of Government. 

But the Democratic party is not wholly blameless for 
this condition of existence, which environs the industrial 
and social life of the nation. It lias not been true to (he 
trust that was committed to its keeping by the Jeffer- 
sons and the Jacksons of the party, and if was this falling 
away from the high purpose of true Democracy that gave 
birth to the Republican party, and made it possible for 
this uneven and wholly undemocratic condition of existence 
of the people, relatively speaking. By their own Lack 
of vigilance, and-by- their almost criminal neglect of the 
holy trust committed to their keeping by the founder 
and the early leaders of the party, the rank and file of 
the Democratic party have yielded to the pernicious in- 
lluenee of political speculators and promoters of strange 
isms and theories to capture the machinery of the organi- 
zation and manipulate it for ends and aims that were dia- 



metrically opposed to every essential feature of Jeffer- 
sonian principles of Government. That the masses of 
all parties are awakening to this fact, and are already 
realizing that their personal independence and their indi- 
vidual right to enter the channels of gain upon an equal 
feeting, there appears to be no doubt. And that they 
would find in the revival and introduction of Jeffersonian 
Democracy into the administration of the public con- 
cerns of the nation no unbiased student of the fundamental 
principles of our system of Government, nor one who 
has analyzed the cause of existing conditions would ques- 
tion for a moment. 

But what are Jeffersonian principles of Government? 
In the first place, they are not spectacular nor tinsel- 
fringed. Jefferson was far from being a free-trader: far 
from advocating anything but sound money ; far from 
countenancing a money aristocracy; far from tolerating 
special privileges to the few or the many; far from per- 
mitting legislation that discriminated between citizens; 
far from encouraging idleness in those whose ancestors 
had piled up fabulous riches; far from admitting the 
justice of the caste system in organizing society. Moral 
worth and intellectual attainment and patriotism meant 
one and the same to Jefferson: that equal opportunity 
to nil should be so distinctly emphasized that no one would 
gainsay its justice, and above all. in whatever all the peo- 
ple have an interest the people may in their collective 
capacity supervise and regulate for not only the best in- 
terests of the people, but for the legitimate good of that 
which is supervised. This is far from being socialism, 
but it does mean a Government for all the people on a 
common basis of encouragement and protection. But where 
shall the people find a Jefferson or a Jackson to lead in 
the mighty work of re-establishing the Government in all 
its branches upon the old foundation of equal rights to 
all and special privileges to none? Surely, this great 
Republic is not bankrupt for the want of such men as 
are equal to the demands of the hour. 



THE ETHICS OF THE RELIEF FUND. 

There are some features connected with the so-called 
San Francisco relief fund, aggregating about $7,000,000, 
which have been overlooked, and which are of vital im- 
portance in iis distribution, if the good name and integ- 
i in ol' the city are to be guarded. In the first place, neither 
the Mayor, nor the Supervisors, nor any other official 
has any jurisdielon over the fund. Moreover, by 
the very nature of things, legal responsibility could not 
be attai beil to the individual members of the general relief 
committee or to any of its sub-committees. The fund 
came from the four quarters of the globe as donations 
to relieve the pressing needs of the lire sulforcrs. It not 
being the province of any of the city officials as such to 
receive and distribute the contributions, it becomes neces- 



if 



% 



The Hub 

CHAS. KEILUS & CO. 

Exclusive 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No branch stores — no agents 

We are now located at King Solomon's 

Hall, Fillmore street, near Sutter, where 

the same high standard of excellence of 

smart clothes will be dispensed at our 

usual square and fair prices. We saved 

our stock and new goods are arriving daily 

KING SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, Near Sutter, 

Ran Francisco. 



^ 



J 



I 









*»ry for men of high standing and well known fol 

-ume an .1 ind appoint 

the I nssumpi 

■Uthoi wns iin rumbenl upon 

than i" be guid indard of 1 i busi- 

nnii h higher than is demanded 

moro than that was demanded of them by the spirit 
of the faith the donon had m them that the trust would 
be administered in harmony with the purpose "f the 
-. which was that the donations were to alienate the 
sufferings "f tin w it In »nt aid or con- 

on from them, it was n bee gift to them. In 
ogle 'lnncir intend that his offering Bhould 
be turned into a loan «>r made an obligation upon 
gle recipient. The donations were for the one, and only 

the one, purpo f aiding those in distress to weather 

the terrible storm until the sun of opportunity foi 
sustaining should again shine. Every penny contributed, 
inomical expense possible for distribution, 
should be given outright to those who were in need. 

It follows, then, thai any scheme, proposition or plan 
to even indirectly loan so much as a nickel or a loaf of 
bread to the indigent would be the equivalent of betraying 
the confidence of the donors, which in turn might well 
be called the most despicable game of confidence thai 
was ever played upon human-kind. Every donation lie- 
longs, by every moral and legal right, to those for whom 
it was intended, and moreover, the logic of the transaction 
is, that the donations and opportunity to be self-sustaining 
should come out exactly even. Hence, any plan to oblige 
the participants in the fund to reimburse any one on 
earth for supplies or money received would be a transaction 
so revolting to true manhood that beside which the 
cruelty and the lawlessness of a Chinese pirate would stand 
conspicuously commendable. And, again, those for whose 
benefit the great heart of the sympathetic donors went 
out in substantial help are to be consulted and their wishes 
righteously, honestly and honorably considered. He is the 
lowest and vilest of wretches who would manipulate this 
fund for his own use and advantage. 



OLD CONDITIONS RECALLED. 

In addition to its usual departments devoted to current 
events of importance, together with some special new 
features of interest, in this, its fiftieth anniversary num- 
ber, the News Letter presents to its readers many extracts 
from old issues of the paper, which cannot fail to attract 
attention. Many of these former contributions to the 
paper are of permanent literary value, as readable fifty 
years hence, or later, as they are now, and as they were 
when first printed. Others are of special interest as re- 
vealing conditions as they were in San Francisco years 
ago. The reminiscences of early days are of great historic 
value, as well as being highly entertaining. There are 
likewise some opinions expressed on the subjects of earth- 
quakes, great fires, water supply, and other topics of vital 
local importance, which read almost as if their writers 
were inspired with prophetic wisdom. 

Unfortunately, most of the old files of the office were 
destroyed in tlie great fire. The series, before the fire, 
included every number of the paper, from July 20, 1856, 
to April 14, 1906. The only ones saved were those from 
1880 to 1890, and a few odd volumes both before and 
after those two decades. For this reason, many contribu- 
tions by eminent writers of both past and present have 
been lost. 

Nevertheless, it is believed that the extracts which are 
reprinted in this anniversary issue include some of the 
best contributions to California literature. 



1 COINCID 
1 in the p 1866, th - 

tieth anniversary in 

od, undoubtedly, which calls for many of thi 
thibited l'\ the men and women ol I 
century ago, who endured 1 hard-hip ami privation, 
der tl might at i mil of their de- 

nation, pluck ami industry. 

When the News Letter made it- flrsl appearance on 
July 20, I860, San Francisco, as an American city, was 
I. in seven years old. The gold rush was 111 its hi 
inn the feverish days of 1849 and 1850 had passed, a 
healthy be ,m having supplanted it. Hut it 
»ii- -till a time of unrest The Vigilance Committee was 
in control of the city, and passions ran high. Communi- 
cation with the outside world was irregular and uncer- 
tain. News and pungent commenl on the prevailing con- 
ditions were demanded, and tl Btablishmenl of a paper 

such as the News Letter was the result. 

<■ thai date, the News Letter has witnessed and 1ms 
been an active oarticinanl in all the vicissitudes of Sum 
Francisco. During the exciting days of the Vigilantes; 
the orderly years thai followed; the civil war period; the 
several mining excitements; the "sand-lot" day-: and 
up to the stirring Spanish-American war period, the News 
Letter has made its voice felt. 

When the great earthquake and lire of Inst spring oc- 
curred, the paper's entire plant was destroyed, nothing 
but the accounts and oilier valuable records and papers 
being saved. About to go to press, it looked as though 
thai week's issue would lie lost, but it was not. A prim- 
ing office was hastily engaged in Palo Alto, and there 
the number of April 21st, a small one. it is true, was 
printed and published. Each succeeding issue has made 
its appearance regularly, and the News Letter can proud- 
ly snv that from July 20, 1856, to the present day. it has 
not missed an issue. The paper has made its appearance 
uninterruptedly, week after week, year after year, its 
columns always devoted in the past, as they are in the 
present and will be in the future, to the leading interests 
of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The circumstances of the News Letter's semi-centennial 
mav be regarded as both a coincidence and an augury. 

It is too bad that Schmitz cannot see his way 

clear to accept the Governorship when all the people are 
hungering and thirsting for his transcendent abilities in 
the State's White House. But picking is mighty good 
where be is, and the field is wide and long, thanks to the 
earthquake and fire. 



E. G. HELLER, formerly of Heller 8 
Frank now at 1884 Fillmore Street, near 
Bush under the firm name of 

E. C. HELLER 8 COMPANY, 










WilB.nl T. Coleman. 

THE VIGILANTES. 

Fifty years ago to-day, when the first issue of the News 
Letter made its appearance San Francisco was in control 
of the famous Vigilance Committee. This determined 
band of citizens held the city nnder as firm a rule as did 
the military a few weeks ago, when totally different causes 
demanded a stronger arm for the maintenance of right 
and order than the established civil Government afforded. 
The Vigilance Committee owed its birth not to any extra- 
ordinary sudden event, bul I" the intolerable conditions 
which were the outgrowth of municipal corruption. It 
was the manifestation of the revolt of the decent element 
of the community against an organized gang of political 
plunderers, who held control of the city Government for 
their own aggrandizement and the oppression of the hon- 
est, respectable citizens. 

There are few, if any, chapters in the history of the 
United States as interesting as that which records the 
doings of the Vigilance Committee during the rule of 
which, in ls."i(i, the San Francisco News Letter was 
born. 

For several years, the worst element in the city's popu- 
lation had held control of the political machine, running 
the elections to suit itself, stuffing ballot boxes, intimi- 
dating those who could not be bribed, placing its own 
representatives in office, electing its own judges and gen- 
erally enjoying a carnival of graft, loot and defiance of 
all the laws of civic decency. So strong and well organized 
was the machine that the respectable element of the town 
was seemingly helpless, at least at the ballot boxes. 

The crisis came on May 14. 1856. On that day, .Tames 
King, of William, editor of the Bulletin, who had un- 
flinchingly, persistently and relentlessly assailed and ex- 
posed the m|sdeeds of the ring, was murdered in cold 
blood, at 5 p- m., by James Casey, a low politician, ballot- 
box stuffer and all-around bad character. 



I.I- Ml , ..II 

form mid 

lie the murder spr> d quickly. 

i determined to end 

AU.ui ; p. in. a delega- 
wenl t.. William T. Coleman, and 
him t<> f.>rin .i \ igilance ' I ileman, who had 

< d to a \ igilan. e < ommittec, formed 
n 1861, u.i- al first reluctant t.. take violent una-. 
a com inced that there was no alter- 
native, it the existing conditions were not to !»• meekly 
endured. 

\ dingly a call «»• issued, signed "Committ 

'ii." the title under which the Vigilance Committee 
• 1 was disbanded. The response was prompt and 
gratifying. Organization proceeded rapidly, military 
methods being followed, Doane, an experienced soldier, 
being placed in charge of the purely military details. Fort 
Qunnybags was erected on Sacramento Btreet, near San- 
some, and cannon mounted behind its walls. 

Dismayed by the suddenness and the completeness of the 
Vigilante's preparations, the comrpl citj officials be- 
stirred themselves to resist further operations. They 
gathered together the police and as many of their hood- 
lum constituents as they could muster, and began arming 
and drilling. 

But their efforts to assert themselves were faint-hearted 

in the face of the determined attitude of the Vigilantes. 
The Governor, .1. Neely Johnson, was appealed I", but 
lie took n. . decided action one way or the other. General 
Wool and Captain (afterwards Admiral) Farragut, com- 
manding the Federal forces, were asked to intervene, but 
they did not feel called upon to do so. 

The Sunday following the murder, the Vigilance Com- 
mittee, well armed and thoroughly organized, proceeded 
to the jail, where its members overpowered the frightened 
guards, entered and took out Casey and another notorious 
character named Cora. The two captives were taken to 
the headquarters of the Vigilantes, where they were given 
a full, fair trial, and found guilty. 

They were then carried forth and publicly executed, 
at the very hour when the body of James King, of Wil- 
liam, was being escorted to the grave. 

The corrupt Government, its hoodlum supporters, and 
the bad element of the city, were now thoroughly cowed, 
but the Vigilance Committee did not stop with the exe- 
cution of Casey and Cora. It set itself diligently to work 
to purify the city Government and the city itself. Bad 
characters were exiled wholesale, the reins of Government 
were assumed by the Vigilantes, and a general cleaning 
out took place. After three months of control, having 
taught a never-to-be-forgotten lesson to the corrupt and 
the criminal, and having seen a good municipal Govern- 
ment in charge, the Vigilance Committee disbanded, and 
thus ended one of the most remarkable instances on record 
of a revolt of decent citizens against a corrupt city Gov- 
ernment. 

The grafters exiled from the city by the Vigilantes 
subsequently sued Coleman for sums amounting to a total 
of $1,500,000, but the suils were all defeated, Coleman 
and the Vigilance Committee being upheld by every court 
East and West which considered the cases. 




SEHES 



i^dtfc^H 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name of Stewart 

Hartshorn on label. 
Wood Rollers Tin Rollers 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 190(i 



A GREAT EXPRESS AND BANKING COMPANY. 

Few among the enterprises of the early pioneer days 
have achieved the remarkable success of the Wells, Fargo 
& Co. Express. It has developed in half a century from 
a small package and letter carrying company to one of 
the greatest carriers in the world. 

'1 he organization which has made such marvelous 
strides was founded in the spring of 1852, when Henry 
Weils, William G. Fargo, Johnston Livingston, D. N. 
Barney and others, animated by a desire to participate in 
the great mineral development of the Pacific Coast, 
formed a company with a capital of $300,000, which was 
later increased to $600,000, to do an express, banking and 
exchange business in California, in connection with the 
leading financial and commercial centers in the East and 
in Europe. 

Success accompanied the enterprise from the start, 
thanks to the great demand for it in the new land, and 
to the ability with which it was conducted, it being char- 
acterized by many features novel to such a concern. 
Prominent among these novel features was a letter carry- 
ing system, technically independent of the United States 
Post-office, but really auxiliary to it. This was highly 
appreciated by isolated miners and others, who, without 
it. would have had little, if any, means of communication 
with the outside world. 

The Wells-Fargo express, exchange and banking service 
grew in both scope and popularity from year to year. In 
i860 a picturesque feature was added in the shape of 
the famous pony express. This was nothing else than a 
system of mounted couriers, riding between St. Joseph, 
Mo., and Sacramento. This great distance had to be 
covered by the solitary horseman, over wilderness and 
through many and varied dangers, not the least of which 
were the attacks of Indians and of highwaymen of the 
white race, but the daring riders made weekly trips, ac- 
complishing the trip in ten days, with the aid of numerous 
relays and the exercise of wonderful skill, endurance ami 
courage. 

With the advent of the transcontinental railroads, the 
business of the Wells-Fargo Company increased still more. 
Its development proeeeded. under wise management, until 
to-day it lias no less than 13,775 rail routes, 1,485 stage 
routes, 635 inland steamer routes and 9,165 ocean steamer 
routes. 

The company runs exclusive fast express trains daily 
between New York and the West, Northwest and South- 
west. Tt has its own express cars, equipped with fire and 
burglar proof safes for valuables: has its own refrigera- 
tor cars for large shipments of perishable matter, has its 
own palace horse cars for large shipments of slock; is the 
only company having its own service across the American 
continent from Atlantic to Pacific ocean; is the only com- 
pany having its own service from New York, San Fran- 
cisco and intermediate points to Mexico; has fully 
equipped customs brokerage departments at New York, 
San Francisco, El Paso, Eagle Pass, and in Nogales, 
Ariz.; is empowered by the United States Government 
to carry goods in bond to inland points of entry, thus 
avoiding the necessity of customs examination at the bor- 
der; and it has its own agents or correspondents in nearly 
every large city in the world. 

The company has 4,410 offices in various parts of the 
world, and a total mileage of 55,000. At the present time 
the company's capita] is $8,000,000. 

Dudlev Evans is the present president of the Wells, 
Fargo & Co. Express, with headquarters in New York. 
There are three great departments of the company, the 
Pacific Department, A. Christensen, manager, San Fran- 
cisco; the Central Department, R. A. Wells, manager, 
Kansas City. Mo.; and the Atlantic Department, E. A. 
Stedman, manager, New York City. 

The general officers of the company are the following: 



President, Dudley Evans, New York; Vice-President, 
Treasurer and Secretary, II. B. Parsons, New York. 
Board of Directors — Dudley Evans, F. D. Underwood, E. 
H. Harriman, II. B. Parsons, II. E. Huntington, J. J. 
McCook, 1!. S. Lovett, George E. Gray, J. Kruttschnitt, 
W. T. Van Brunt, W. V. S. Thorne. W. F. Herrin. W. 1 >. 
Cornish. 

Each of the three departments has its sub-departments, 
its divisions, its route agents, and its various other 
officials. The company as a whole is a conspicuous exam- 
ple of excellent organization, enterprise and executive 
ability. 



The Hotel Rafael guests have been enjoying the 

splendid weather of the last week at that noted resort. Free 
from fog, the cool nights have been delightful, and the 
long evenings have been a source of never-ending pleasure 
to tired business men. There are but few resorts near 
San Francisco that are so conveniently situated, and yet 
so distant, in point of seclusion, as to seem far into the 
mountains and miles from a great center. Here is the 
place for rest and recuperation. 



The Vienna Bakery. 12 "2 6 Post street, is reaping a 

splendid harvest these days. The old clientage has come 
back to it, and a new lot of customers has been added to 
the list of patrons. This is a splendid location for patron- 
age by business men who desire a quick and satisfying 
meal, and ladies out shopping will find it an ideal lunch- 
eon place. 



Kv'I'wv*vt'I''I''1'*''''i'*'»^'''''*'*^v'*'5 




HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



.S THE WHISKEY 

OF REFINED TASTE. 

THE CONNOISSEUR'S 

FIRST CHOICE. 



S CHARLES to. REYNOLDS CO. 

c, San FrunclHco, Cal. 



1906. 



SAN 



II 



Wn.tiw 

•■ win. )l 

A n.l perishes i 

If tli thy gentl 

X.ir hi 

In tl r thought 

Will now thy own ii demand me there — 

That heart whose Fondest throbs to me were given? 

My nam. 1 on earth was over in thy prayer, 

Ami wilt thou never utter it in Heaven? 

In in. ^nlows fanned by Heaven's life-breathing wind, 
In the resplendence of thai glorious sphere, 

An. I larger movements of the unfettered mind, 

Wilt thou forget the love that joins as her 

The love that lived through all the stormy past, 
Ami meekly with my harsher nature bore, 

And deeper grew, ami tenderer to the last — 

Shall it expire with life and be no more? 

A happier lot than mine ami larger light 

Await thee there, for thou hasl bowed thy will 

In cheerful homage to the rule of right, 

Ami lovest all anil renderest good for ill. 

For me, the sordid cans in which I dwell 

Shrink and consume my hear! as heat the scroll; 

And wrath has left its sear — that fire of hell 

Has left its frightful sear upon my soul. 

Yet though thou wear'st the glory of the sky, 

Wilt thou not keep the same beloved name, 

The same thoughtful brow and gentle eye, 

Lovelier in Heaven's sweet climate, yet the same? 

Shalt thou not teach me in that calmer home 

The wisdom that I learned so ill in this — 
The wisdom which is love — till I become 

Thy fit companion in that land of bliss? 

— San Francisco Nevjs Letter, June 19, 1886. 



THE FATTIER OF THE DREDGING INDUSTRY. 

The most important development of recent years in the 
mining industry of California has been the adoption of 
the dredger as a means of extracting the yellow metal 
from the river beds, where it lies in great quantities. 
Although desultory efforts were made as long as fifty 
years ago in California, Montana, and, later, in a few 
other American States, to dredge the river beds, the re- 
sults were unsatisfactory until about eight or nine years 
ago, when the process was adopted on a large scale, which 
has since developed so enormously that in a year the gold 
production of the United States increased bv over $7,000,- 
000, nearly half of which, or $3,000,000, was due to the 
dredger. 

To W. P. Hammon of Oroville has this great invention 
been mainly due. His experiments and practice showed 
the advantage of dredging in gold mining, and indicated 
the methods which should be followed. To-day, Mr. 
Hammon is the foremost operator in California; indeed, 
in the United States. 

The first dredger was put in operation in the Feather 
River district in March, 1898, and its great success led 
Mr. Hammon to introduce the method in the. Yuba 



lay no les* tlni 

I million i him- 

an. I ii win, Ii |), 

Hammond, th.- noted mining sngii 

by both Kastorn an. I lie 
lal. By thus menring tie 

lined. 'I i the first 

two put by Hammon in the Yuba and fields 

H00, ap 

Without the dredgers which Mr. Hammon has bo widely 

ilitro.li |. millions of dollars worth of gold would lie 

untouched indefinitely al the bottoms "f the rivers and 
streams. B) means .>f the dredgers, the gold-bearii 
of the river beds is brought to the surface, its gold ex- 
ed, and the rejected dirt thrown back again. 

Some idea of the value of Ham u's , a the 

industry may he gathered from the fad thai the Califor- 
nia State Mining Bureau estimates the possible outpul 
oi the dredgers in this State alone al *;. ,000 a year 

for the uexl thirty years. 

Other States and other nations, even Australia. New 
Zealand ami far-away South Africa, are now profiting by 

...r. Sammon's genius. 

01 Mr. Hammon it may he said thai he has added mil- 
lions upon millions of dollars to the wealth of the world. 

by means of his admirable process of dredging the rivers 
in order to obtain from them the gold which, hut for the 

dredger, the miner would never have discovered. Ii \ 

well known that streams an' great sources of gold sudoIv. 
Rivers are hut larger streams. That they contained vast 
quantities of gold was always suspected, and it became 
known when samples of river bottoms were brought to 
the surface here ami there. How to obtain this sub- 
merged gold in quantities was the problem which Mr. 
Hammon has SO successfully solved. 

Willi gold-bearing rivers all over the world awaiting 
only the advent of Ihe dredger to deliver up their vasl 
treasure, the value of Mr. Hammon's devices, not only 
to capitalists and miners, hut to Ihe world at large, the 
wealth of which his dredgers so greatly increase, miiv 
readily be imagined. Estimating the output of the 
dredgers in California alone al $1 .unn.niio a year, it re- 
quires no great nowers of imagination or computation to 
appreciate what ill'. Hammon has clone for the cause „f 
gold mining and Ihe increase of the world's wealth. 

Mr. Hammon is not onlv one of the greatest mining en- 
gineers of the da'- — he is also a financier of merit. Along 
with the increased ">'Oss returns from his dredo-ing pro- 
cess, he has steadily decreased the latter's cost, to the 
end that the net wealth produced is steadily growing. 
His merging of previously independent mining interests, 
too, has been ably executed, and has effected a still fur- 
ther decrease of expenses along with increase of profits. 

Rightly may Mr. Hammon he called "The Father of 
Ihe Dredger" — that new tool of Ihe miner which is add- 
ing tremendous and unexpected output from his industry. 



ENNE1NS 



^C. BORATED 
O TALCUM 




XOILET 
fioWDE 



_A Positive Rehe 
PRICIOY HEAXSias 
CHAFING, and •"■•■" 
SUNBURN, "WSr" 

Remove* nil odor of perspiration, Dc- 
llgturul alrcr Shaving. Sold everywhere, or 
Gel Mcnnen's (the original) Sample Free. 



12 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906. 



Tlw iPqpuskir UnAstsfeir 



What Bret Harte Heard in a Sleeping Car. 

We had stopped at a station. Two men had got into 
the ear and had taken seats in the one vacant section, 
yawning occasionally, and conversing in a languid, per- 
functory sort of way. They sat opposite each other, occa- 
sionally looking out the window, but always giving the 
stray impression that they were tired of each other's 
company. As I looked out of my curtains at them, the 
One Man said with a feebly concealed yawn: 

"Yes; well, I reckon he was at one time as popular an 
undertaker ez I knew." 

The Other Man (inventing a question rather than giv- 
ing an answer, out of some languid social impulse) — But 
was he — this yer ondertaker — a Christian — had he jined 
the church'/ 

The One Man (reflectively) — Well, I don't know ez you 
might call him a perfessin' Christian : but he lied — yes, 
he hed conviction, f think Dr. Wiley lied him under 
convict ion. Et least, that was the way I got it from him. 

A long, dreary pause. The Other Man (feeling it was 
incumbent on him to say something) — But why was he 
popler ez an ondertaker? 

The One Man (lazily) — Well, he was kinder popler 
with widders and widderers — sorter soothen 'em a kinder 
keerless way; slung 'em suthin here and there sometimes 
outer the Book, sometimes outer himself, ez a man of 
experience ez hed hed sorrer. lied, they say (very cau- 
tiously) lost three wives hissclf. and live children by this 
yer new diseasi — diththery — out in Wisconsin. 1 don't 
know the facts, but that's what got round. 

The Other Man — But how did he lose his popularity? 

The One Man — Well, that's the question. You see, 
he introduced some things into ondortaking that was 
new. lie hed, lor instance, a way. as he called it, of 
manniperlating the features of the deceased. 

The Other .Alan — How manniperlating them? 

The One Man (struck with a bright and aggressive 
thought) — Look yer, did yer ever nntiss how, generally 
speaking, onhandsome a corpse is? 

The Other Man had noticed this fact. 

The One Man (returning to his fact) — Why, there was 
Mary Peebles, ez was daughter of my wife's bosom Eriend 
— a mighty pooty girl and a perfessing Christian — died 
of scarlet fever. Well, that gal — I was one of the mourn- 
ers, being my wife's Eriend — well, that gal, though I 
hedn't, perhaps, oughter say — lying in that casket, fetched 
all the way from some Al establishment in Chicago, filled 
with flowers, and furbelows — didn't really seem to be 
of much account. Well, although my wife's friend and 
me a mourner — well, now, I was — disappointed and dis- 
couraged. 

The Other Man (in palpably affected sympathy) — 
Sho! now ! 

"Yes, sir. Well, you see. this yer ondertaker — this 
Wilkins — hed a way of correcting all that. And just by 
manniperlation. lie worked over the face of the de- 
ceased until he produced what the survivin' relatives 
called a look of resignation — you know, a sort of smile 
like. When lie wanted to put in any extrys, he produced 
what he called — hevin 5 reg'lar charges for this kind of 
work — a Christian's hope." 

The Other Man — I want to know. 

"Yes. Well, f admit, at times, it was a little startlin'. 
And I've allers said (a little confidentially) that I hed 
mv doubts of its being Scriptooral or sacred, being, ez 
you know, worms of the yearth : and I relieved my mind 
to our pastor, but he didn't feel like interfering, ez long 
ez it was confined to church membership. But the other 



day, when Cy Dunham died — you disremember Cy Dun- 
ham," 

A long interval of silence. The Other Man was looking 
out of die window, and had apparently forgotten his 
companion completely. But as 1 stretched my head out 
of the curtain I saw four other heads as eagerly reached 
out from other berths to hear the conclusion of the story. 
One head, a female one, instantly disappeared on my 
looking around, but a certain tremulousness of her win- 
dow curtain showed an unabated interest. The only two 
utterly disinterested men were the One Man and the 
Other .Man. 

The One Man (detaching himself languidly from the 
window) — Cy Dunham? 

"Yes. Cy never hed lied either convictions or perfu- 
sions. Ustei get drunk and go round with permiseuous 
women. Sorter like the prodigal son, only a little more 
so, ez far ez I kin hulge from the facts ez stated to me. 

Well. Cy i lay petered out down at Little Rock, and 

was sent up here for interment. The fammerly, being 
proud-like, of course, didn't spare any money on that 
funeral, and it was — now between you and me — about >•/. 
shapely and lirst-class and prime-mess afl'air ez I ever 
saw. Wilkins bed put in his extrys. He had put on to 
that prodigal's face the A 1 touch — bed him lixed up with 
a Christian's hope. Well — it wuz about the turning point, 
for thar was some of the members and the pastor hissclf 
thought that the line oughter be drawn somewhere, and 
thar was some talk at I tea. Tibbet's about a reg'lar con- 
ference meeting regard in' it. But it wasn't that which 
made him onpoplar." 

Another silence — no expression or reflection from the 
face of the Other Man of the least desire to know what 
ultimately settled the unpopularity of the undertaker. 
But from the curtains of the Various berths several eager 
and one or two even wrathful faces, anxious for the re- 
sult. 

The Oilier Alan (lazily recurring to the lost topic) — 
Well, what made him onpop'lar? 

The One Alan (quietly)— Extrys, T think— that is, I 
suppose — not knowing (cautiously) all the facts. When 
Airs. Whiddlecoiube lost her husband — 'bout two months 
ago — though she'd been through the valley of the shadder 
of death twice — this bein' her third marriage, hevin' been 
John Barker's widder 

The Other Alan (with an intense expression of interest) 
Xo, you're foolin' inc. 

The One Alan (solemnly) — Ef I was to appear before 



r 



DAN O'CALLAGHAN 

928 Fillmore St., San Francisco.Cal. Tel. Park 584 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 
SELLING, LEASING and RENTING 



City Agent, 



The LIVERPOOL and LONDON and GLOBE Ins. Co. 



^ 



\* 



Losses Paid Promptly Dollar for Dollar 

Neiv Insurance Solicited 



■/ 






PRANCI8I M W8 LBTTSR 



widder • 

Well, this « i.l- 
put up a big funeral f..r the di - \ ilkina, 

just Ini.l hiaaelf ot 
Onfnrt'nati Iv perhaps forfnatcly in th( 
of Proridci , ,,|,| friend 

up there in i I own t.. the funeral. He 

ip with the friends to U.k at the imilin' 

v -mil.-, and everybody 
■in- to meet his reward, and this yer friend turns 
round, short and sudden on the widder Bettin' in her pew, 
ami kintliT enjoyin', /is wimmen will, all the compliments 
paid the coqwe, :■ it*l he - he: 

•■ What .li'l yon Bay your husband died of, marm?" 
"Consumption," . wiping her eyes, poor critter 

sumption — gallopin' consumption." 



rid nol bein' erer undei 
man died of strychi ik at thel U 

I I'll. I's »!: 

•rt.r profani . i 

" Wl - the widder, " thet- thel is hi 

- a Christian resignation." 

" Thel !«• Mowed; don'l tell me," sea he. " Hell is full 

"'' thai kind ol on. [fa pison. And I'll " 

Win. dern my skin, yes we are; \.~. ifa Joliet Wall, 
now, who'd hev thought we'd been nigh on t.. .„, hour? 

Two or three anxious tK.m their berths: 

3 . look yer, stranger I ol.l man I WTial became 
of " 

Bnl the One Man and the Other Man had vanished. 



n Francisco News Letter, April v 



181 




BUM HER AND LAZARUS, EMPEROR NORTON'S TWO DOGS. 



D©nm® 



Y@®ir§ Asp 



The center of the legal and notarial business forty 
years ago, and even up to the early part of the seventies, 
was in the News Letter quarter. Merchant street was a 
busy locality at that time. The old Bank Exchange, on 
the corner of Washington and Montgomery, and the Par- 
ker House, almost directly opposite on the west side of 
Montgomery, were the resorts of the prominent figures 
in law and journalism at that period. Many of those 
great lawyers wrote for the paper on topics congenial to 
them. John B. Felton, Elisha Cook, Harry Byrnes, 
Judge Dwindle, and his still more gifted brother, John 
Dwinelle, sent around their copy, and the readers won- 
dered, when some absurd judicial decision was criticised, 
from whose pen the biting paragraphs came. James 
Gibb's, on Merchant street, was another rendezvous for 
this class. It must be remembered that there were but 
two clubs in the city then, and those saloons filled the 
blank, and there lawyers, merchants and journalists met 
and discussed the events of the day. A conspicuous 
figure among them, and an intimate friend of Mr. Mar- 
riott, St., was John Nugent, the former editor of the 



San Francisco Herald. Nugent was a man of rare 
general information, and a strong and trenchant writer. 
Up to the time that the Herald was resuscitated, Nugent 
wrote almost weekly for the News Letter, and then the 
cares of his own paper occupied all his time. 

This was before Montgomery avenue was thought of. 
The old Metropolitan Theatre and Etienne's restaurant 
were near the corner of Washington and Montgomery 
streets. Emperor Norton, whose name is now only a 
memory, girt with his formidable sabre, stalked along 
the footways, followed by Bummer and Lazarus, those 
historic dogs whose fame was identical with that of their 
master. The "Great Unknown," a fantastically dressed 
and mysterious dandy, promenaded Montgomery and 
Kearny streets, receiving the jeers of the populace with 
a calm, impassive stare. Montgomery and Kearny streets 
were the thoroughfares where all the swell people of the 
town exhibited themselves in the afternoon, for Market 
was a raw and unimproved region in the last of the 
" sixties," 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 190(3 



AN ENTERPRISING MINING MAS. 
Few men have been so prominently identified with the 
gold mining industry of California as R. 6. Hanford, 
whose operations have been conspicuous during recent 
years, particularly in the American River district, where 
he is the manager of the largest gold dredger in the world. 
This great dredging craft is owned by a great mining 
company, a large part of the stock of which is held by 
the Armours, of Chicago. 

Mainly owing to the enterprise, experience and ability 
of Mr. Hanford, this company has been extracting vast 
quantities of the yellow metal from the beds of the Ameri- 
can and tributary rivers, where, but for the dredgers, it 
would be lying idle for an indefinite time. 

By means of his dredger, however. Mr. Hanford has 
dug down deep into the auriferous soil of the river beds, 
scooping up great quantities of the earth, from which 
abundant gold has been extracted with comparative ease. 
Some idea of the efficacy of his work may be gathered 
from the fact that it is 30 feet to bed r'ock in the Ameri- 
can River district, and 60 feet to bed rock in the Yuba 
district. This great stratum of gold bearing earth is now 
being systematically sifted of its gold by Mr. Hanford, 
who, with other industrious dredging operators, is in- 
creasing the gold output of the State beyond the fondest 
expectations of a few years ago. 

It is estimated that there is about 25,000 acres of proved 
dredge land in the Sacramento Valley alone. Assuming 
an average yield of 15 cents per cubic yard, which has 
been the experience thus far, and with an average depth 
of 9 yards, these 25,000 acres should yield $163,350,000 
before mined out. 

Long interested in gold mining, it has only been within 
the last eight years or so that Mr. Hanford has applied 
himself to the dredging process for obtaining gold, but 
within that time he has added millions to the gold produc- 
tion of the country. Several improvements in methods 
have been devised by him, and his dredging operations 
are becoming more and more profitable each year. 

Thanks to Mr. Hanford and other dredging operators, 
the Sacramento River valley has become a greater mining 
center than ever, or even than was ever expected, before 
the dredging industry was adopted. 

Mining men and capitalists are quick to appreciate 
the worth of men of Mr. Hanford's qualities. To them 
such a man is a most valuable asset. The same capital in- 
vested, the same field for activity offered, the same 
machinery available, in the hands of another man would 
produce but a fraction of the net results. The enterprise 
might fail altogether. But with a Hanford in charge, 
directing and watching and devising, the single dollar 
becomes multiplied. 

These facts are patent to those immediately interested. 
To the public in general, the value of a man like Mr. 
Hanford is also of great concern. By largely increasing 
the gold production of the State, Hanford's abilities and 
activities have added millions to the State's production 
of wealth, which would not have been added by a less 
capable and resourceful man. Under the efforts of his 
great dredgers, the reluctant gold is brought forth in 
such huge quantities that California deserves more than 
ever the title of "The Golden State." 

Mr. Hanford spends most of his time on the spot where 
his dredgers are at work. He is not a man to leave things 
largely to subordinates. While often called by business 
to San Francisco, and to other distant points, his field is 
in the Sacramento Valley, and more particularly in the 
American River district. 

Mr. Hanford still has many years of valuable work- 
before him, for, as stated above,' many millions yet of gold 
remain in the Sacramento River Valley to lie extracted 
b- means of the dredging process. When this supply is 
exhausted by this new method, there are numerous other 



river beds in various parts of this and other countries 
where the dredger ma- be put to work. To Hanford and 
men of his kind must the management be entrusted. 



A LEAVER OF THE BAR. 

One of the greatest names in the history of California!! 
jurisprudence is that of Samuel Mountford Wilson, who 
was associated with many of the greatest legal cases known 
to the State. Handling in a masterly manner every case 
that fell to him, he took particular interest in and was 
especially successful with those involving fundamental 
principles of law. 

Descended from old English stock, Samuel Mountford 
Wilson was born in Steubenville, Ohio, on August 12, 
1823. He was educated at Old Grove Academy, Steuben- 
ville, and was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court 
of Ohio at the a^e of twenty-one. 

In 1853, Mr. Wilson and bis law *>artner, Joseph P. 
Hoge, moved to California, where they practiced law 
with marked success until 1861, when the partnership 
was dissolved, although both parties remained warm per- 
sonal friends. 

Three years later, that is in 1867, Mr. Wilson formed 
a partnership with A. P. Crittenden, which lasted until 
the Litter's death in 1870. 

Upon the death of S. W. Sanderson, Governor Haight 
offered Mr. Wilson the Chief Justiceship of the Supreme 
Court, but it was declined. Later, Mr. Wilson took a 
prominent part in the constitutional convention of 1878, 
and in 1SS0 was one of the Board of Freeholders con- 
vened to draft a new charter for San Francisco. 

Mr. Wilson founded the law firm of Wilson & AVilson, 
which still exists, his son being the junior member 
when the firm was formed. Mount ford' S. Wilson, of 
Wilson & Wilson, is to-day one of the best-known mem- 
bers of the San Francisco bar, and a worthy representa- 
tive of his distinguished father. 

Among the notable actions-at-law with which Samuel 
Mountford Wilson was associated were the Broderick will 
case, the Lick Trust litigation: the Mining Debris cases, 
the T.ow will case ; McCreery vs. Everding : Ashley vs. 
Cunningham, the Granger cases, Meeks vs. Olpherts, in 
which the opposing counsel was (he late Montgomery 
Blair, and many others of nearly, if not quite, equal im- 
portance, in which the issues of law of the highest im- 
portance were involved. 

With the exception of the constitutional convention, 
and the drafting of the San Francisco charter, mentioned 
above, Mr. Wilson generally avoided public life, devoting 
himself to his profession with an ardor which quickly 
bore rich fruit. He was a brilliant lawyer in every re- 
spect, and bis knowledge of the law made him a credit 
to the bar of both State and nation. 

On July 5, 1848, Mr. Wilson married Miss Emily .7. 
Scott, daughter of Hon. John Scott. 



Techau Tavern 

LADIES TEA ROOM 

Music every afternoon during shop- 
ping hours between 3 & 5 P. M. 



Sutter St,, above Van Ness Ave. 






PIlAXi mi: 






T5» I&ig(al@ffiffi ©If L®V© 

•■ 

the day. nh.n the *-n and th 
tin' sunrise al 
■Tlh with n heart full of mil mirth. 

To »•■• k for the Kingdom of Ixn 

• on the •■• 
Wh would lead me aright, 

And he said: "Follow me, and pou will see 

[ti glittei og turn - of tight." 

And soon in tl ty Bhone f;iir ; 

rider," he Baid, "there it gleams I" 
But alas! for the hop re doomed to despair, 

It wu onlv the Kingdom of Dreams. 
Then the next man I asked was a gay cavalier, 

And he said: "Follow me, follow me," 
And with laughter and Bong we went speeding along 

By the shores of life's beautiful sea. 

Till we came to a valley more tropical far 

Than i In- wonderful Valley of Cashmere, 
And I saw from a bower a face like a flower 

Smile out on the gay cavalier. 
And he said: "We have come to humanity's goal — 

Here love and delight are intense," 
But alas ! and alas I for the hope of my soul — 

It was only the Kingdom of Sense. 

As I journeyed more slowly I met on the road 

A coach with retainers behind, 
And they said: "Follow us, for our lady's abode 

Belongs in the realm you will find." 
'Twas a grand dame of fashion, a newly-w 7 ed bride: 

I followed, encouraged and bold, 
But my hopes died away, like the last gleams of day, 

For we came to the Kingdom of Gold. 

At the door of a cottage I asked a fair maid. 

"I have heard of that realm,'' she replied, 
"But my feet never roam from the Kingdom of Home, 

So I know not the way," and she sighed. 
I looked on the cottage — how restful it seemed! 

And the maid was as fair as a dove, 
Great light glorified my soul as I cried: 
"Why, Home is the Kingdom of Love!" 
(Sun Francisco News Letter, Sept. 11, 1886.) 



THB i ILIVORNIA 8AI I. OEPOSll 

i \n 1 1:1 81 < OMPA \ I 
r test of tl 

ban dial illy endured by the 

of the California S 

irner of California and 
-""" ,; ■. during the earth 

and fir.- of April 18-81, 1006. Neither earthqua 

fected these vaults in the least Although in the 
part of the city where the flames raged most fiercely, the 
vaults, after the ten feel of debris which covered them 
was removed, were found to be intact, and their contents 
were nol even damaged. The same vaults are to-day in 

■11 ikI as ever. 

These vaults, the Bra! of their kind to I Btablisl 

1 jo, were installed in 1873. They survive.! 
untouched, after the building itself was destroyed by the 

Strongly built, of the besl quality o 
in masonry, they weir monuments to Uie security of the 

valuables placed within them. 

The California Safe Deposit and 'Trust Company ; - 
one of the soundest institutions of its kind in the counrn. 
An old established concern, it has enjoyed a renin; 
prosperity since its organization in its present form in 
1882. It re-opened after the Bre upon its old site, whet 

ii In-, lav occupies the lower floors of a substantial struc- 
ture, well-equipped and as attractive to the eye, exter- 
nally and internally, as it is secure. When it re-opened, 
the firm had over 500 customers in line waiting to view 
their deposits, which they found, on inspection, to be as 
safe as ever. All left completely satisfied, 

The California Safe Deposit nad Trust Company is 
capitalized at $3,000,000, with total assets in excess ,,r 
$19,999,999. It docs a regular banking business, both 
savings and commercial, and its popularity has increased 
daily, both before and since the tire. As an evidence of 
its progressiveness, it may be said that the bank has 
established branches, for the benefit and convenience of 
its customers, in three different parts of the city. One 
is on Geary street, near Fillmore: another on Devisadero 
street, near Post: and the third on Valencia street, near 
Twentieth. 

The company is one of the strongest financial institu- 
tions, not only in tbe West, but in the entire country, its 
affairs managed by men well-known in the world of 
finance and business. 




BAT COUNTIES PORTABLE HOUSE CO. 
Office in their own cottage, 414 Market street, between Battery and Sansome — 
Dealers In cottages, stores, campers' cottages, automobile houses, bunk houses, 
churches, school houses, etc. Best portable house tn the market. Ready for im- 
mediate delivery. 




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I.KTTBR. 






UNITED BAILRO WORK. 

The fort- r m the rebuilding of Sun Fran- 

has been • Railroad- 

rail" ,| land 

,ran " sv mid 

with 

sth its power ho uulj damaged mid ia 

; . many of its «»r> burned, 
- trolley wir.s and a down 

mgled into a b . which 

included its , i. the principal thor- 

oughfare of thi upl.ii ly d i|| ( . United 

Railroads nevertheless, within a few hours after the 

strophe had care again miming. - after- 

noon, April 81st, the Bre was out At ! :3" |>. in. that 
erenii rted running on Fillmore street, bul 

after two hours' operation was suspended for a time al 
the request of the i itv authorities, but was soon after re- 
ramed. Within ten days after the earthquake cars were 
ninnin^' on Market Btreet. Such remarkable energy and 
ability is unprecedented in the annals of Btreet railway 
enterpris 

The suddenness with which the earthquake came in- 
stantly stopped all Btreet railway traffic, cars halting 
where they were at the time of the shock. Vet that very 

day. April 18, when the fires were raging at their fie 

the United Railroads began active preparations for a 
prompt resumption of traffic. Not once did President 

Patrick Calhoun and his associates hesitate or doubt the 
c|itick recovery of San Francisco from her terrible blow. 
Their confidence in the great citv never wavered for a 
moment. Before the fire was extinguished, new cars and 
other material had been ordered from the East, debris 
was being cleared from the blockaded tracks, employees 
were being directed to report for dutv, damaged cars were 
being repaired, and the plan of immediate resumption 
of service was being developed with a rapidi+" and cor- 
rectness of judgment which has rarely been equaled and 
never excelled. 

Means of fettin- about the city were imperatively 
demanded. The United Railroads decided that the means 
should be at once provided, and they were. 

Quietly, but energetically and industriously, gangs of 
men were started into the streets to clear the tracks, erect 
trolley poles and string the wires. The-" worked with 
almost superhuman energy, under the able general direc- 
tion of General Manager George F. Chapman and his 
assistants, General-Counsel Tirey L. Ford taking, mean- 
while, the necessary legal steps to secure the approval of 
the municipal authorities, who heartily indorsed the com- 
pany's efforts to help the city. 

Almost daily developments were made after the first 
cars on Fillmore and Market streets were running, the 
Ellis and O'Farrell, the Turk and Eddy, the 
Mission, the Third and Kearny, the Castro, the San Ma- 
teo, the Sutter and Post, and other lines following in 
rapid succession, until to-dav 27 lines are in operation 
apd more being added. The general adoption of the. 
trolley electric system made the rapid restoration of the 
service possible, the underground systems being virtually 
impracticable under the special conditions, as they are 
objectionable at all times. 

For the first few days the company carried women and 
children free, the fares collected from the men being 
given to the relief committee. 

On the morning of the earthnuake, at the request of 
the Mayor, the company organized 2,000 of its uniformed 
employees into squads, each under the command of an 
inspector, to patrol the city, warning householders to put 
out fires, guarding unprotected property, and doing police 
duty at the expense of the United Railroads. The salt 
water pumps of the company at Kentucky and Sixteenth 



•rking, and saved much property n 
run into I 
for the hi 
••• the hungry in ninny pis 

the relief fund. $14,000 of which was in tho 

n "h was the tinting relief supplies 

ity. 
But <>'.■ transit « means 

na ly the United i: 

noving the debris from the burned section of the citj 

Dough to appall the moat determined. Y.-t the 
United Railroads undertook it Aided by the care, the 

employees of the Bteam railroadf 
I nited Railroads early in June began removing the 

- of bricks, stone, iron, steel and other constt 
material which lav in nuns. The work has 
with activity excelled only by that of the resumption of 
»< i traffic, until the city has promise of an earfj readi- 
ness to rebuild permanently on a large scale. 

Meanwhile, the United Railroads is keeping the 
tories in the Basl busy manufacturmg now and up-to-date 
equipment for it. New cars oi 
made, and will be received at an early date. Tin ori 
temporary trolley polos will be replaced by ornam 
ones, the road beds will be bettered in numerous places, 
a more rapid service will soon be inaugurated, and the 

a of betterment will be carried on as energetically as 
ever, until San Francisco shall have the besi streel rail- 
road system in the world. The company has already be m 
spending millions for San Francisco. It propose* to 
spend more. 



All kinds of interior repair work and furniture made to order as 



usual. UNITED CRAFTS AND ARTS, 147 Presidio Ave. 



t 



Your Home 
Is First 

We know it and so does 
everybody else ; that is why 
we are selling so much carpet 
and furniture. 



r % 



All a man lives for is to 
make those at home happy 
and a well furnished house 
goes a long way toward it. 



We realize present condi- 
tions and are getting close to 
the buying public by enjoy- 
ing a tremendous patronage, 
with "small profits" as the 
lever. 



Furniture, carpets, 
bedding and stoves. 



rugs, 



L A VENSON-SHIEL Y CO. 

m Haight, & Webster Sts. 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1006. 




FINANCIAL 




A despatch received here from Glas- 

Mair Siller Gane gow during the week just past re- 

frae Ilamc. ported a big slump in the shares 

of the Fresno Copper Company on 
the stock exchange there, in consequence of the a: nouncc- 
ment that Frederick Siebert, an expert appointed to ex- 
amine the property, had condemned the mine. Shares 
selling at $5 dropped to $1.12. The News Letter, over a 
a year ago, repeatedly warned the Scotch shareholders in 
this property to leave it severely alone, and to refrain from 
trusting their money with the management until they 
had received a report from an independent expert on the 
value of the property. It was pointed out to them that the 
board of directors, which consisted of John H. N. Graham 
and W. H. Kidston, of Glasgow : Edmund Bellairs of Lon- 
don, and H. B. Vercoe, M. I. M. E., a north of England 
man hailing from Fresno in this State, were virtually the 
original vendors of the property, and that experts who 
examined the mine were acting throughout for Vercoe, 
the prospectus itself stating that they were employed "on 
the instructions of Mr. Vercoe. on behalf of the vendors.'' 
The experts so retained were "Mr. Herbert Lang, Oakland, 
California, one of the best known authorities on copper 
mining," in itself a very broad assertion: "Mr. YV. J. 
Stoneham of San Francisco, and Mr. IT. V. Wheeler, of 
Los Angeles, California." That is all plain enough, and 
so are the reports which are contained in the prospectus. 
There is no necessity at this late date criticising the very 
fulsome statements from these reports, published for the 
benefit of investors, nor the valuation of ore in reserve. 
figured out by Lang, "net values in sight," at $720,000. 
by Stoneham at " fully 100,000 tons of ore in sight." The 
ore in the mine is figured out elsewhere in the prospectus 
on the basis of a daily treatment of 200 tons of ore. yield- 
ing 6 per cent of copper, equal to 24,000 pounds of copper, 
at, say, 12 cents per pound, as yielding $2.SS0, to which is 
added $400, equal to $2 per ton, the yield estimated from 
gold and silver in the ore. This makes a total yield per 
day of $3,280, from which is deducted $3 per ' ton for 
mining. $G per ton for smelting, and $1 per ton for con- 
tingencies — $10 per ton in all, equivalent to $2,000 ex- 
penses on working a 200 ton lot. This shows a daily 
net profit of $1,280, approximately £2f>0 sterling. In face 
of repeated warnings (hat statements of vendors' experts 
were only good for what they were worth, and should not 
be accepted without a close investigation by an independ- 
ent expert, acting for intending purchasers, if only on the 
business principle of caveat emptor. However, easting all 
prudence and advice to the winds, the Glasgow buyers 
jumped at the bait, and got trapped as they have done be- 
fore. 

Of course, it is too late now to reiterate all the particu- 
lars of this most extraordinary transaction, reading within 
the lines of which should hare put any commonsense per- 
son on guard. In the first place, the property which cost 
a mere song at the beginning is found in the hands (if 
the California Conner Syndicate, the shareholders of which 
we find were Messrs. Graham. Kidston. Bellair and Ver- 
coe, the latter owning £10. GOO in stock, Graham £250, 
Kidston £780, Bellairs £1.000. Tin's thev held as directors 
of the California syndicate, the interests in which (hey 
turn over to the Fresno Company for £105.000. out of (he 
£175,000 of capital, and in which the same people, Gra- 
ham, Kidston, Bellairs and Vercoe, figure as directors. 



continuing as the controlling powers of the property in 
which they themselves appear as vendors, with Vercoe In 
the role of managing director at £1200 for two years to 
start with, this salary only ran until profits were being 
earned, when the remuneration was to be readjusted. The 
other directors were to get £1,000 per annum each, but 
not until the mine was paying, so they were not much 
benefited by that arrangement. 

It will be seen from this that by skillful manipulation, 
the flotation upon the market of this 105,000 shares of 
stock was a bonanza in itself, especially as at one time the 
stuck was quoted on the exchange in May last year at 
over £2 per share. Back of this deal, however, lies an in- 
teresting story of the skilled manipulator and the greedy 
and ignorant investor in mining shares. Vercoe was the 
originator of the Copper King deal out of which he cleared 
a small fortune by the sale of the property to Gardner 
& Italy, which was subsequently floated in London on Sir 
Christopher Fumcss and others who dropped hundreds of 
thousands of dollars to gain a little experience. The 
Fresno Copper flotation has not proved such a bad invest- 
ment for Vercoe and his associates, even if the mine has 
gone to the bad since his experts reported on it, provided 
the share market fluctuations on the Glasgow exchange 
were not all wash, and (he stock got well out among the 
dearly beloved. The Fresno investors deserve all they have 
suffered in tl. • loss of money, for a lot of pig-headed, con- 
ceited fools (hal (hey have again shown themselves to be, 
not only in this case, but in other mining ventures in Cali- 
fornia, where theii pockets have been lightened consider- 
ably, invariably by some " trusty fiere." It is safe to 
wager (hat their returns from their latest financial coup 
in Frcsnos will not be a= heavy as they might desire. 

Con.- Virginia responded to (he jack- 
The Comstock screws a rum or two during the week. 
Muriel .Dull. This is ascribed to (he prospects for ore 
on the 2350 level, where the correspond- 
ing drift in Ophir, the 2200. is dow over (be line, and into 
the old bonanza ground. The Con -Virginia Company is 
now running it to make connection villi a drift well ad- 
vanced at the other end from the shaft. The fact that Hale 
& Norcross, in producing ore enough (o eventually help 
out materially the working expenses of the mine, has 
strengthened up the stock considerably. That is a pretty 
solid reason to ascribe for an advance in price of a stock, 
which is more than can be said for the infernal rot, rife 
on Pine street for years past (hat an upward movement in 



HIGH GRADE BONDS 

Negotiable in All Principal Markets 



YIELD 4 TO 5 PER CENT 
LIST ON APPLICATION 

3? 



N. W. Halsey (^ Co. 

413 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 



Jclt 21, 1006 






19 



Mining Booms in 
Nevada. 



< m <1n pun-lia* - 

Th- 
ink for 

on ili" 
which f.>r 

■ in i.f ili.' ground. 9 > ill l>c 

_ properh 
to pro i n id the future of either 

In Iheni ih • ore has alread 
nil. nml h ih,. appro il in a 

condition which will perm i I of handling it t.> the b 

One by ••in- th ■ 1 1 ~ levied Mine time 

re fiilliiiL' due, and accordingly the active operators 

■re "ii ih" alert t.> take ili" benefit i>f the spurts in prices 

which nearly always take place in - 

the date of delinquem - spurts 

- good as .in ordinary ore >t rikc and they generally 

last about as long. Still a smart operator can catch tli" 

turn ni in- times out "f tli" proverbial ten. Only one moru 

tent was levied during the week, on nts on 

I'nion Con. 

It is rather difficult to procure 
straight news from the great min- 
ing camps "i s,.iiili in Nevada, 
[or tli" reason that the report made 
by I l"i iiiiin Zadig, the well known broker, who has just 
returned from a tour of these districts, will 1>" acceptable 
reading to many people with financial interests there. Mr. 
Zadig is quite enthused with tli" prospects in nearly all 
the leading camps, ami expresses surprise at the improve- 
ments going cm and the money spent there of late. 
Money seems plentiful, he says, with everybody, money 
too, taken out of the mines. Tonopah ores arc now being 
worked as high as 90 per cent, which means the utilization 
of ores running as low as $10 per ton. This should prove 
an important factor in promoting the mines of this 
district, ami a mill will shortly start up of 100 stamp 
capacity, at which the same process will be employed as at 
the Best & Belcher mill on the Comstock, wdiere the good 
results mentioned have been obtained by the concentration 
and cyaniding of the ores. He tells of a new and import- 
ant strike in the West country, working out in the direction 
of the Tonopah Standard, strengthening the popular belief 
that all the Tonopah veins will yet be found that far west. 
Goldfield, with its free milling ores, is growing steadily 
in importance, with the mines opening up in a manner 
which is surprising. Manhattan has a great destiny, ac- 
cording to Mr. Zadig. The ore is there, he says; all that 
is wanted is plenty of water to run mills to reduce the ore 
into bullion. Of course, wonder is expressed that more 
San Francisco capital is not in evidence in these great 
camps, but that is a common remark by all visitors to this 
part of Nevada. It has cost San Francisco a lot of money 
by its neglect of opporrunites of the kind in the past, which 
would come in quite handy now. Mr. Zadig is a firm be- 
liever in the possibilities of deep mining on the Comstock, 
and it will be hoped that his proposition to combine the 
efforts of the leading companies in sinking a shaft to 
the depth of at least 4,000 feet will yet be carried out. 
Many well posted mining men believe that the real wealth 
of the Comstock will be discovered in the deep levels, and 
Mr. Zadig is one of them. 



California Oils 
in Great Demand. 



California oil is in demand. The 
Gracioso, a London corporation in 
which some San Francisco people 
were interested, has made quite a 
deal of late, a contract having been made for the delivery 
of 20,000,000 barrels of oil to buyers in Japan, and an- 
other large order has come from Chili, and it now looks as 



h il will \ 

1. nml the 

the immei 
'he ml production «S Ut 
i .>f the busineaa whii h is in; 

The feature "f the 

ind Bond Exchange 

"f bit" has been the strength 

and activity of the sugar li-t. Tin' improvement 
general in this line of investment, with a marked scarcity 
of the lead t" either bid np for 

them "i- go without \ strong tone is 1 in 

the shares "i tie water and powder companies. Tin' regu- 
lar dividends by the local companies, with one or two 
exceptions, are being paid with unfailing regularity. There 
has been Borne talk again about the sale of the California 
street cable mad to the United Railroads. This is vigor- 
ously denied "ii both sides, but that is one of the peculiar 
methods of the local promoter, who, the closer ii comes to 
the closing <>( a deal, protests the more vigorously that 
there is absolutely no truth in the rumor. The deal now 
under way will he announced some day before long. As it 
i>. it is only a question of -.'tiling on a price, the railroad 

I |il" asking more than the other si.l" is willing to give, 

although ih" liii" is actually worth as an investment every 
dollar that is asked. Hon. Is of all description are in good 
dollar that is asked. The Presidio & Perries road will 

likely be included when the sale of the California is 
closed, the buyers being the same people. 



IN THE RIGHT DIRECT! OX. 

Mr. R. Y. TTalton, of the Hotel Rafael, has begun an 
active and efficient campaign to refute the idea that is 
nrevalent that there is no up-to-date hotel in or near San 
Francisco to accommodate the advent of the regular travel 
and the vast number of shdit-seoing tourists who are com- 
ing west. Mr. Ilalton will make known the fact that the 
Hotel Rafael is open all the year, that here one may enjoy 
every possible home comfort, that there are private rooms 
or suites with baths, that all outside rooms have long- 
distance telephone connection. 

The American and European plan is in vogue, the cui- 
sine is unexcelled, the climate is ideal, the "rounds beauti- 
ful, and the natron may indulge in all outdoor or indoor 
snorts. The hotel is onlv 50 minutes awav from the fur- 
thest business center of San Francisco. Mr. Halton in- 
tends to make the above so plain by reiteration that any 
San Franciscan can rattle it off from memory. 



r. 



P. E. BOWLES 



.W.WILSON 
Vice-Prej. 



IS 



AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 



DEPOSIT GROWTH 



Mar. 3, '02 


$ 387,728.70 


Sept. 15, " 


1,374,983.43 


Mar. 15, '03 


2,232,582.94 


Sept. 15, " 


2,629,113.39 


Mar. 15/04 


l| 3,586,912.31 


Sept. 15, " 


; 3,825,471.71 


Mar. 15, '05 


,'4,349,427.92 


Sept. 15, " 


4,938,629.05 


Mar. 15. '06 


5,998,431.52 


June 18, " 


6,650,555.88 


MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BUILDING 


Francis Cutting, 


Geo. N. O'Brien 


Vice-President 


Cashier 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906 



©w Easrf @sft €©imftirfc(t®rg 



By the Editor. 



Great were the men who, in the early days, contributed 
to the News Letter. Bret Harte, Mark Twain, Ben- 
jamin P. Avery, Rhodes, James Watkins, and Prank- 
Souk found a place between its covers, for the bril- 
liant contributions which afterward made many of 
them world-famous. Frank M. Pixley, the late 
editor and proprietor of the Argonaut, and one of 
the most brilliant writers this coast has ever produced, 
was a regular contributor to the News Letter from war 
times until he established the Argonaut. 

Among the early writers on the News Letter at the 
end of the "GO's" there prevailed a feeling not alone of 
good fellowship, but in many cases of strong and enduring 
friendships. James Bowman, or " Jim," as he was gen- 
erally called by the fraternity, was fond of entertaining 
his associates on the paper at a picturesque home he in- 
habited on Washington street. His talented and excellent 
wife, who was an honorary member of the Bohemian Club, 
assisted Bowman in making those reunions delightful. Jim 
Bowman was a most independent character. In argument 
he was intensely aggressive. 

Bowman's contributions to the News Letter were char- 
acterized by a terseness of expression and an intense 
acridity when somebody had to be "burned up" or 
" taken down." He was fond of throwing in a Latin 
quotation here and there, and not a little conscious of 
his knowledge of the classics. He was the first to agitate 
and arrange for the collection of Pollack's poems. There 
he was a better critic of other's compositions, not an un- 
usual thing, than of his own work. He wrote more than 
average verse. It was always metrically exact, but he 
never reached the higher altitudes, or basked in " the 
light that never was on land or sea, the inspiration and 
the poet's dream." 

Bowman's connection with the News Letter was of an 
erratic character. Some months he was a salaried mem- 
ber of the staff, but worked for the most part as a con- 
tributor. He wrote clearly and well on political topics, 
and liked nothing better than an order for a caustic ar- 
ticle of a personal direction. He took a keen pleasure 
in book reviewing, and his comments on current litera- 
ture were among the best features of the paper. 

The biting agnostic articles which appeared over the 
signature of "The Parson" were directed against the 
leading clergymen of the city, or, perhaps, to put it more 
correctly, were bitter criticisms upon their methods and 
doctrines. The identity of " The Parson " was a secret 
except to a few of the staff. Their severity was unabated 
by any remonstrances from the parties assailed, and as a 
matter of fact, " The Parson " had always a reason for 
his diatribes. Some contended that a clergyman was 
the author of those cutting comments, because no layman 
could be expected to be as familiar with church affairs. 
None suspected then, and not many are now aware, " The 
Parson " was Captain Rogers, a pilot who lived in Oak- 
land, and who wrote most of his contributions while 
standing on and off outside the Golden Gate, waiting for 
a ship. 

At this period, the regular staff of the News Letter con- 
sisted of Dan O'Connell, editor; Ambrose Bierce, Town 
Crier; and James Bowman, general editorial writer. But, 
in addition to these there was a host of contributors — 
J. Tremenheere Johns, the original Town Crier; Bret 
Harte; James Watkins, later editor of the New York 
Evening Sun; Henry George, Reverend Wm. Harvey, an 
was no taint of literary jealousy in Bowman's composi- 
tion. He was ever anxious to : suggest and advise. And 
Oxonian and a clergyman of the Church of England ; Ed- 



ward Neumann, twin brother of Paul Neumann, of Hono- 
lulu: Isabel A. Saxon, and many others. Editorials on 
foreign affairs were mostly written by Mr. John Melville, 
an English gentleman of rare culture ,and an intimate 
personal friend of Mr. Marriott. His wife, a very accom- 
plished lady, was also a contributor to the paper. 

Bret Harte, who was then editing the Overland 
Monthly, with John Carmony as its publisher, brought 
one day the manuscript of the celebrated "Heathen Chi- 
nee " to Mr. Marriott. He handed it to Ambrose Bierce, 
who at once recommended Harte to use the verses in the 
magazine. To this advice Harte objected. He consid- 
ered the matter too trivial for magazine poetry, and 
offered it to the News Letter, but finally concluded to keep 
it for the Overland, which he did for many months after 
it was written. When it did appear, it made the hit of 
the season, and was copied not alone all over the State, 
but in the East. It was the indirect means of an offer 
from the proprietors of the Atlantic Monthly of the edi- 
torship of that magazine to Harte. 

Harveys' principal work in the News Letter was a col- 
umn or more of doggerel verse written in Cockney dialect 
over the signature of "Mrs. Harris." It was a commen- 
tary on the doings of the week from the Harris standpoint", 
and was usually very pungent and clever. His review of 
the sermons of the week, written from a clerical and theo- 
logical basis, used to make quite a stir among the church 
people. He was in every respect a singular character — 
a Bohemian who would have been in harmony with the 
times of Dick Steele and Goldsmith. He was careless 
and extravagant to a degree, but had periods of the strict- 
est propriety and economy. His return of grace was 
indicated in a curious manner. It began with the purchase 
of a silver pencil case. Then a watch and chain, and 
lastly, good clothes and a shiny silk hat. And when he 
grew tired of the straight and narrow path, the silver 
pencil case was the first article to go. 

Tremenheere Johns, the first Town Crier, was an ex- 
ceptionally brilliant man. He was a most versatile, all- 
round writer, and was equally facile in his descriptions of 
the opening of a new clothing house or restaurant, or a 
paragraph on the latest blunder of the city fathers. He 
was a rapid and voluminous worker, and even toward 
the end of his life, when he suffered incessantly, used to 
turn out a vast amount of "copy." Johns was an excellent 
dramatic critic, and spoke as well as he wrote. He re- 
garded life as a huge farce, and was never serious when 
he could be otherwise. He did his best work on this 
journal, and always took a strong personal interest in the 
Town Crier Department, resenting the introduction of 
any paragraphs but those he had himself written. 

Bowman succeeded Johns as Town Crier, biit he lacked 
the crispness of the other. Neumann occasionally con- 
tributed to this department. 

William M. Laffnn, late publisher of the New York- 
Sun, was a constant contributor to the News Letter dur- 
ing the Franco-German war, and he had a singular knack 
in forecasting the result of many of the great battles. 
William H. Rhodes, one of the most brilliant writers 
of that period, gave the News Letter much interesting 
matter. His metier was the weird and fanciful, and he 
had an abiding horror of humbugs, whom he never failed 
to puncture when the opportunity offered. 

Stephen Massett, known to early Californians as 



Selling INSURANCE of the strongest com- 
panies only, who are paying a hundred cents 
on the dollar in ' San Francisco. 

"Insurance That. Insures" 

H.H. Varney, 2912 Mission St., San Francisco 



« 



8A\ FH . 






ru f..i, ng hii 

- >« il»» ! (he butt of tl 

Iiki-<1 to hoax him. and had no sympathy with his 

le like 
pir, ami never perm 
irlt him. 

and '70 ma; then be 
.farm - « al [ins, Vmbroso 
ptain Rogi •-. Jami - Bowman, 
John Melville, Wm. Harvey, with a numb 
sional contributors. The poets of the period wi 
lly fond of the News Letter, and many of oui 
contributors made their mark in the world, 

oel among these are Prank II. Gassaway, Q. II. 
■. Fred Emerson Brooks, and others of lesser light 
Reverend Dr. . a Catholic clergyman whose 

health compelled him t.> abandon the active duties of bis 
calling, was from '73 to '78 s valuable member of the 
Utter staff. I>r. Bleasdale was a mosl skillful 
chemist, and had his laboratory on Merchant 
joining the office of this paper, which was then en 
in an active crusade against food adulterations of every 
prion. Analyses were made by the doctor, and the 
published results startled the community. The News 

Letter was persistent in its course of exposure, and the 

effect of those investigations were most beneficial. 

Theodore A. Harcourt, a young Englishman, came 
from the literary department in Bancroft's to edit the 
News Letter at this period. Harcourt was an impressive 
and original writer, and some of his verses save promise 
of a more than ordinary future. An intimate friend of 
bis. and a constant contributor, was Walter M. Fisher, 
who afterward, upon the death of B. P. Avery, assumed 
the editorship of the Overland Monthly, and who is now 
in England engaged in literary pursuits. 

William Love] Eyre, a versatile writer, had charge of 
the paper for several years, and wrote the Town Crier 
department, besides articles of general interest, and good 
verse. 

David W. C. Nesfield wrote and edited the News Letter 
for some time : Bichard Gibson and Edward Moran suc- 
ceeded him. The Town Crier department was written 
for some years before and after this period by Daniel 
O'Connell, who, except with rare intervals, had contribu- 
ted to the News Letter columns for twenty-five years. 
Another writer whose articles attracted much attention 
was Mme. Corlette. She wrote over the nom de plume, 
" Silver Ten," and is still remembered very favorably. 
Earl Marble was editor of the paper about the end of the 
eighties. J. H. Gilmour, one of the most able and power- 
ful writers on the Coast, had editorial charge of the 
paper for about two years. 

That brilliant writer of fiction, and essayist, W- C. 
Morrow, also held the editorial reins for two years, and 
gained for the paper hosts of friends by the care and at- 
tention he' bestowed upon its every detail. 

Sam Davis, now insurance commissioner of Nevada, 
was a frequent contributor about this time. 

Howard V. Sutherland took charge of the editorial 
management of the News Letter after Mr. Morrow's re- 
tirement. His lyrics were welcomed to the columns of this 
journal long before his more intimate connection with it. 

William M. Neilson, who was connected with the News 
Letter as early as '69, and he was accounted a jour- 
nalist of world-wide repute and experience; Arthur Mc- 
Ewen was a regular contributor for years on the paper. 
Mr. John Einlay has for many years conducted and 
written the financial and mining portion of the News 
Letter, and has done it so well that its statements and 
opinions are now continually quoted in London and Paris. 

To enumerate the talented men and women who have 
during fifty years given their brightest and best ideas 
to this paper would be to make a list of nearly all the 



! 

II. I.. Barnes, ami of numerous other writers of pro- 
nounced abilil 
Among -those of the \. iwi 

B.), Frank 
\l. Pixley, Wm. W. Neilson, William Loveil Eyre and 
Henry D. Bigi low. Mr-. Austin's artii li 
and amusing, and hi mre and accurate, 

memory of Hen ,\ fresh in the hearts 

"f ln> admirers and friends, who are many. He 

brilliant writer and a genial Companion, and as sueh will 

ever be affectionately remembered. 



HI8T0RK l/. 



The history of the News Letter may rightly be divided 
into three pan-. The earlier contribute] lape 

00 npj then- niches in the temples of literarv fame. From 
1896 to the day of the greal earthquake, may be called 

another division. The men who have edited and 
tributed to make the News Letter the brightest weekly 

journal in San Francisco during the period mentioned 
are M.me of them dead and others are still in the harness. 
Among the brightest of these was Kirk Ward, a bril- 
liant and erratic writer, now gathered to his fathers and 
who beaded the list. Ward was well known all over the 
Pacific Coast and in the Northwest. Following Mr. 
Ward as Editor came Ashton Stevens, the famous 
dramatic critic, now connected in the above capacity with 
the Examiner, into whose employ he graduated from the 
editorial desk of the News Letter. Following Stevens and 
part of the time associated with him was Gellett Burgess, 
the creator of the "Goops" and the "Purple Cow"; and 
also Jack London, together with Carroll Carrington, ver- 
satile writer of epigrams, later connected with and part 
owner of "Town Talk." Wallace Irwin, a humorist who 
has since "made good" in New York became the editor 
after Mr. Stevens, then W. J. Weymouth, now on the 
staff of the Chronicle, and Austin Lewis, poet, literateur, 
lawyer and now a Socialist leader. Mr. Lewis, resigning, 
created a place for one of the best editors the News Letter 
ever had. In the transition from the incumbency of Mr. 
Austin Lewis to that of Mr. Arthur Dutton, the editorial 
chair was occupied by Mr. Robert Sullivan, a veteran in 
the News Letter service. Mr. A. H. Dutton, ex-lieutenant 
in the United States navy and to whom the present 
editor is indebted for much that is of value in 
this issue, in the production of which Mr. Dutton 
acted as co-editor until called to a position in the 
San Francisco Chronicle. Mr. Thomas B. Wilson, 
old school gentleman and now editor of the Berke- 
ley Gazette, became editor of the News Letter in succes- 
sion to Mr. Dutton and has been connected with the paper 
as the writer on "Foreign Affairs" for a long time. On 
Mr. Wilson's resignation Mr. Dutton again gathered into 
his hands the editorial supervision of the journal and 
held that position until the earthquake and up to the 
strenuous period immediately following the great fire, 
and until the advent of the present incumbent, Mr. 
Pierre N. Beringer, ex-war correspondent N. Y. Herald 
and Call, formerly editor of the Overland Monthly, and 
once with the Examiner on the Editorial Council and 
chief of the art department of that daily newspaper. 

Mr. Frederick Marriott has inherited the journalistic 
capacity of his father. During all the editorial changes 
he has managed the journal in all its departments, and 
that the News Letter has always been a great financial 
success is due to his discrimination in the selection of the 
bright men who handle the editorial end of a great weekly. 



_ 



22 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Gmm§> itanffl th® IF@nas ®ff tilfo® M@na wfia® 



July 21, 1906 



Gmiw imadl® ftlh@ T®wini Cow Fsm5i®ges 



"What on earth do you mean by waking mc lip 

this time o" night?'" angrily said the occupant of a slate- 
room on the overland road to the conductor. " Why. I 
want to tell you that your wife has just fallen off the plat- 
form. Thought you might want to telegraph back from 
the next station." " Think she was killed?" "Oh, certain! 
— dead as a door nail !" " 1 hen why couldn't you have 
just wired back yourself to have her sent after us on ire, 
and not disturbed me in this ridiculous way? For 
heavens' sake, don't let this occur again." "Let whit 

occur " but the passenger was asleep. This incident 

vividly illustrates the utter want of consideration ex- 
hibited by the railroad officials in this country. 

It doesn't pay to take the springs and stuffing out 

of a sofa, and then get inside yourself in order to discover 
whether your wife is unfaithful or not. Perhaps this ad- 
vice may be regarded as superfluous by our married read- 
ers, but Mr. John Enders. of Chillicothe. 0., adopted this 
plan last week. It would have possibly been successful. 
but when Mrs. E. and the " bold, bad man " of the occa- 
sion entered the apartment. Mrs. E., who is very fat. sat 
right down over Mr. E.'s head, and unconsciously 
smothered that suspicious gentleman to death. This is 
a warning to married men. 

" Men can't hold a baby !" is the latest domestic 

assertion of Mrs. Henry Ward Beecher. This is pre- 
cisely what we think. Two able-bodied men can't hold one 
even, and this is why we have always maintained that 
babies should be shut up in separate stone cells, or at any 
'amped down to the floor with heavy iron fetters. 
Women have got the bulge on us in that industry, we ad- 
mit, but on the other hand, we can hold about two and 
a half times more whisky sours than they can. 

Manager Hill went behind the scenes the other 

evening to see that everything was right before the cur- 
tain rang up on the Black Crook. As he gazed at the as- 
sembled ballet, the appearand- of one or two of the cory- 
phees corrugated his histrionic brow with a three-ply 
frown. "Young ladies -• ugly, " we do not 

require you to possess the genius of a Rachel or the in- 
tensity of a Clara Morris, but we do expect you to keep 
your tights pulled up." 

A party started from the Western Addition, the 

other evening, to attend the California Theatre. The 
street car ran off the track, and they were fearful of 
_ late at the performance. As they reached the cor- 
ner of Bush and Kearny streets, some fifteen minutes af- 
_-liorn out at the heads indulged in a pro- 
roar. "There," exclaimed one of the ladies, much 
annoyed, " they have begun already — I can hear Kerne." 

There is no ridiculous nonsense about the honest 

oodians. The mos _ ius waltzer at a dance there 
last week excused himself at half-past eleven because he 
had a stage-coach to roll at twelve. Whit a rebuke this 
is to our own giddy, procrastinating, self-indulgent votar- 
ies of pleasure. That man is bound to rise — even if the 
whole community have to pull on the rope. 

A poor mechanic who started to walk all the way 

from St. Touis to this fair city of alleged plenty, has 
just brought up in the almshouse at Omaha. This was 
the luckiest thing that could have happened to the man. 
particularly as there is lots of complaint about the Alms- 
house here. 

Stories are afloat that the American section at the 

Exposition is chiefly noticeable for its displays of patent 
teeth. These are false. 



With a self-sacrificing generosity that does theni 

infinite creditj ••'Jhe Sausalito Land Company have de- 
cided to offer a hundred and fifty choice building lots" for 
purchase, by what we fear will prove an ungrateful and 
nnappreeiative public. We do not know- the terms upon 
which the Sausalito corporation proposes to thus benefit 
humanity, but desire to state that for half the money the 
writer is willing — even anxious — to dispose of one '"choice 
and desirable lot" in the same vicinity. It is true, the 
•ty last referred to is situated on a hill having a slope 
of fifty-live degrees, and possessing no verdure visible to 
the naked eye, but a house can be readily made to stick 
to its surface by the simple device of anchoring it to 
tied round the extreme summit of the hill, and as 
for grass, the rocks can be painted green at a very trifling 
cost. Our agent is now engaged, with a double-barreled 
gun. in shooting seed into the cracks of the soil from a 
step ladder, and the surrounding scenery is so tame as to 
feed out of the visitor's hand. A purchaser for this un- 
equaled bargain is earnestly desired before this year's 
taxes are due. 

We make an earnest appeal to the public on behalf 

of a destitute English traveler now in our midst. This 
gentleman, the day after his arrival, took one of the City 
Cab and Transfer Co.'s cabs, in order to visit the Cliff 
Soue ! "inately. he fell asleep on the road home, on 

ring which the driver quietly returned to his stand 
without awakening his fare. The intelligent reader can 
easily imagine the sequel. When the passenger's nap 
was oveT his bill amounted to a small fortune. Having 
only a few thousand dollars about him. he was com- 
pelled to remain in the vehicle, where he is still confined, 
being fed through the window by his mercenary captor. 
This began nearly a week ago. and. although his victim 
has cabled orders to mortgage his entire estate, it will re- 
quire the addition of a gei - - Ascription by our citi- 
zens to effect his release. The attention of English resi- 
- - specially called to this sad case. An extra divi- 
dend may be expected on City Cab Company stock this 
month. 

Some confident individual advertises thus : 

"Wanted immediately, a kind, patient, settled woman."' 

an only presume that the advertisement must have 

come from an undertaker, who thus modestly seeks patron- 

- nee the only draw-back to kind, patient, settled 

women is that, when discovered, they are generally as dead 

as the babies found in corner lots by inquisitive school 

children. When not dead, they arc engrossed by some 

brute who cultivates the ''patient, settled" qualities 

with list ami club. An ordinarily well treated woman is 

neither settled nor patient. She is hissing steam, she is 

adulterated nitro-glycerine, she is noise and rattle, and 

whine and fuss and feathers — she is a woman. Advertise 

Ise, worthy friend, that is easier to be 

found. (Jet a boiler inspectorship, a Texas subsidy, 

i point from Jim Fair, or some other attainable trifle. 

We met a friend the other day, clad in an eccen- 
tric suit of tweed. The vest was too small for him, the 
o For him. and the pants were too long for 
short for the other. But he was happy, 
and. glorying in the fustiness of new clothes, he invited 
us in to christen them, observing: "Old hoy. I've just 
struck a huge wrinkle — system of self-measurement. I 
followed the directions, sent on the coin to New York. 
measured myself all over, and bad these clothes made for 
20 per cent less than I could have got them in San Fran- 
cisco." 












Our readers will doubt le 

■ m.in in ill.- tin. 



at nl>out \ 

funeral en 

house 



hiiiii- 

a taken a man, 

•bus untin 

■ >ur court! 
that the plaintiff im entitled 
njoy In* ncw-fonnd peace, without Jmvinp In- 
! relative wedged under the door with his morning 
paper, ik. We are reminded of this incident, 

though we don't Bee why, by the announcement that the 
now collecting a fund to "pay Dr. 
Mary A. \\ alkei - 
Chicag ■ lever by half. 

There ia jnsl one thing the n which will 

probably not be known even at the last great day. 01 
. we allude t'< the fact that, of all dyed-in-the-wool 
fat-wits, all the unutterably dense and deep-drained idiots 
that ever spoiled good, clean paper, the pick and flower 
are invariab I to write the poems for Declaration 

Day services. These reflections are inspired chiefly by 

old-blooded assault upon meter and rhythm p 
bated by the particular numb-skull whose rhymes 
ished tin- decorators at the Sold iterv last Thurs- 

day. If it be any satisfaction to the poet of the occa- 
sion to know the fact, let him cherish, next to the proud 
satisfaction of havine done his whole duty, the profound 
assurance that there is not one of his late audience but 
henceforward would decorate his grave with the choicest 
flowers and — with pleasure. 

Our light hearted and genial friend, the Coroner, 

dropped in to see the Deluge at the California Theatre 
the other night. As the curtain fell on the angry waste 
of waters, he was so overcome with emotion that tears 
rained down his cheeks. "What is the matter?" asked 
an astonished friend. " Just to think," exclaimed our 
municipal hyena in a broken voice, "what a good time 
the Coroners must have had in those days, right after 
the water subsided. Why, they must have made a thou- 
sand dollars an hour, every mother's son of them. Regu- 
lar case of flood and O'Brien." They led him home in 
sympathizing silence. 

A subscriber up-country writes : " I see your 

papers are making lots of fuss over some triplets recently 
born in your city. I think I can beat that. Seven years 
ago I was married, and subscribed for the News Letter 
same day. Regularly, every year, my wife has presented 
me with twins. I liave now fourteen bouncing children, 
with two more in the offing, so to speak." If by the above 
rather peculiarly worded" statement, our correspondent 
means to hold us responsible for the generous results re- 
ferred to, we emphatically deny the insinuation, and 
shall stop his paper at once, for self-protection. 

Now doth the broiling citizen 

Hie to the foaming beach, 
And as he dons his clammy tights 

The hoodlums jeer and screech. 
All cramped from out the undertow, 

He scrambles in a fright, 
And finds some greasy "hand-me-downs" 

The only' clothes in sight. 

After taking a deep breath, a preacher who is 

famous for his unsensational sermons, asks the question: 
Whither is humanity drifting? Since the opening of the 
saloons, July 5th, we can account for a large section. 

It has just been discovered that Howe, the inventor 

of the sewing machine, was of Polish descent, which is 
another proof that the needle is true to the pole. 



tted the f« 
I'm dern glad to hear it. 

, how all-! 

ght I'd take the hull bilin' one on 'em th 

be mumps, and we'i 
ii the l:4( tnything el 

, Mr. J ilii ' ; . " Indeed I" " ies, I wat 

show 'em how you told thai story about your wife 
getting upsel in the river. Couldn't yon jest sit down 

on this tire ping and -how Maria how you did it?" " I 
think not." responded the lirst actor of his day, icily. 
" Don'l see why you won't show the children. I allm-s 
patronize the theatre when I come up to si-ll hay. By the 
. I »ii> trying to catch the step when you dance with 
jirls in the Brsl act I ome, now, jnsl walk into 
this fruit-store, that's a gomi fellow, ami do it once oi 
twice for me, won't von? It'll tickle the folks down our 
way most to death." Jefferson says he intends to go armed 
after this. 

Probably the saddest thing ever occurring on the 

Pacific Coast took plan- last Tuesday evening. An es- 
teemed friend of the writer's, and who is, unfortunately. 

entirely bald, dined with a part] at Marchand's, and get- 
ting sleep] during the meal, indulged in a brief nap on 
the lounge. After that he dropped into the theatre, and 
took a front seat. He was much annoyed by the immoder- 
ate giggling and unseemly merriment of some people be- 
hind him, especially as the play was a tragedy. The more 
he scowled over his shoulder, however, the worse they be- 
haved, so that he finally went home quite disgusted. The 
next morning, as he stepped into his bath, he thought his 
head felt rather sticky, and he turned on the warm shower. 
Presently a large green wine label detached itself, on 
which was printed, "Old and very dry." Our friend says 
he can't see the first glimmer of fun in these idiotic prac- 
tical jokes. 
Now soft the tarry pavements bob, 

The flies disturb our snooze, 
The broker feels his empty fob, 

And longs for Santa Cruz. 
Mamma says, "Country." Pa says " No, 

The farmer will not trust; 
Next year to Paris we will go — ■ 

Just give me time to ' bust !' " 



SHREVE & 
COMPANY 


HAVE ON SALE 
THEIR USUAL 
COMPLETE STOCK OF 
DIAMOND and GOLD 
JEWELRY, WATCHES, 
SILVERWAR£, GLASS- 
WARE, ETC., AT 

Post Street and 

i Grant Avenue, and 

2429 Jackson Street 

San Francisco 


Prompt and careful atten- 
tion given to correspondence 



fit nil run i u-mii 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 21, 1906 



THE WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

A notable epoch in the history of railroading in the 
United States will be marked by the opening To travel 
and commerce of the Western Facific Railroad, by which 
the Gould system will have an ocean to ocean line, through 
an interesting and rich country, with principal termini at 
Baltimore and San Francisco. 

This great undertaking of the Gould interests is now 
well advanced toward completion. Unless some unfore- 
seen difficulties intervene, which does not seem probable 
at the present time, the Gould roads will be running 
transcontinental trains in two years from to-day. They 
will surely be running from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
in three years at the outside. 

The Gould lines at the present time have two great 
eastern termini, one at Buffalo, N. Y., running thence 
to Pittsburg; the other at Baltimore, running thence to 
Cumberland, Maryland. The main line of the Gould 
transatlantic road, when the Western Pacific carries it to 
the Pacific ocean, will be between Baltimore and Oakland, 
by a remarkably direct route. The first section of this 
road is now built and being operated between Baltimore 
and Cumberland, Md. From Cumberland a link is being 
built to Wheeling, West Virginia, whence the line will 
run, via the Wheeling and Lake Erie, the Wabash and 
the Missouri Pacific roads, to Pueblo. From Pueblo 
the road will be over the tracks of the Denver and Rio 
Grand to Salt Lake City. From Salt Lake City the 
Western Pacific railroad, now under construction, will 
complete the whole line to Oakland and the Pacific ocean. 

The Western Pacific road will traverse a peculiarly 
attractive territory. From Salt Lake City, the tracks 
will skirt around the southern shores of the Great Salt 
Lake, of which excellent views may be had from the ear 
windows. The path followed here will just miss the 
prominent mountain ranges, advantage being taken ot 
passes and of every other natural feature that tends +o 
lessen grades. In fact, emphasis must be laid upon the 
fact that the grades throughout the whole extent of the 
Western Pacific road do not exceed one per cent., which 
is a condition unique in transcontinental railroads. 

After leaving the southern shore of Great Salt Lake, 
the road enters ami crosses the wonderful great mud 
desert, one of the most interesting geologic sights of the 
country. This remarkable desert is 100 miles long and 
40 miles wide. 

From the mud desert the line goes into the Goshut 
valley, crossing the tracks of the Nevada Northern rail- 
road, which is now being built from Cobra. Nev., to the 
old mining town of Ely, where there are important copper 
deposits. After leaving the Goshut valley, the line passes 
across the Poquop range, where, in all probability, unless 
present plans are changed, there will be a tunnel 12,000 
feel long — over two miles of tunnel, through a region 
calling for the exhibition of the highest engineering skill. 
From this tunnel, the road goes to Wells, on the Humboldt 
river, after which it follows the river banks for a distance 
of 183 miles, paralleling the Southern Pacific mad, to 
Winnemucca, Nev. From Winnemucca the Western 
Pacific runs nearly due West to the Black Rock desert, 
where it turns South, striking the Northwest coiner of 
Pyramid Lake, and entering the state of California in the 
Honey Lake valley. 

Then the road climbs the mountains to Beckwourlh 
Pass, named after the famous old guide of pioneer 
days, Jim Beckwourth. This is the summit of the 
Sierras reached by the Western Pacific, the elevation 
being 5,019 feet, which is 2,999 feet less than the greatest 
elevation of the Central Pacific at Donner Lake. The 
greatest elevation anywhere on the Western Pacific is 
about 5,905 feet, at the summit of the Toane range, on 
the rim of the Salt Lake basin, close to the Utah line. 

At Beekwourth Pass there will be a tunnel 6,500 feet 



long, which carries the line to the extreme head of the 
Feather river, which it follows for a distance of 135 
miles to Oroville. In the course of this distance of 135 
miles there is a tunnel at Spring Garden creek, 7,300 
feet long. There is likewise a loop just to the westward, 
where the track crosses itself, the curve containing no 
less than tOO degrees of curvature. The descent from the 
Siena Nevada range is at a one per cent, grade — 52.3 
feet to the mile. 

From Oroville the road goes to Marysville, thence to 
Sacramento, and from Sacramento to Stockton. Be- 
tween these points the road is nearly an air-line. From 
Stockton the road will make use of the 18 miles of the 
Alameda and San Joaquin railroad, which was pur- 
chased by the Western Pacific load. The road follows 
the route of Alameda creek to Xilcs, where there is a 
tunnel 4.100 feet long. From Niles the road runs di- 
rectly to Oakland by way of I lay wards and San Leandro. 

The Western Pacific railroad, in addition to following 
the route having the lightest grades across the mountains, 
will follow one of the most picturesque regions of the 
continent. In addition to the variety of mountain, lake, 
valley, desert and river bank scenery ever present, there 
will be places of historic interest traversed by the road, 
which will be equipped with the latest devices and in- 
ventions of railroad engineering. 

The entire length of the Western Pacific, from Salt 
Lake City to the Ferry building in San Francisco, will 
be 924 miles. 

Work is being prosecuted vigorously on the Western 
Pacific. The engineering corps have carefully surveyed 
the entire route and are now engaged in laying out the 
path of the road across the tract it will pass. The con- 
struction gangs are in the field and every effort is being 
made to prosecute the work with both speed and thor- 
oughness. 

The principal officers of the Western Pacific railroad 
are E. T. Jeffery, of Xew York, president ; W. J. Bartnett, 
of San Francisco, vice-president and general counsel; 
V. G. Bogue, of San Francisco, vice-president and chief 
engineer; B. M. Bradford, of San Francisco, secretary; 
and J. D. Brown, of San Francisco, treasurer. 

Up to the time of the great fire of April 18-21, the 
Western Pacific company had offices in the Safe Deposit 
building, corner of Montgomery and California streets, 
San Francisco. After being burned out there, the com- 
pany lost little time getting new quarters, and it is now 
comfortably and conveniently housed in the Montgomery 
Block, southeast corner of Washington and Montgomery 
streets, San Francisco, the Montgomery block being one 
of the few office buildings in the down town business 
district of the city which escaped damage from both 
earthquake and fire. 

As said at the outset, the completion of the Gould 
route across the continent will mark an important epoch 
in the development of railroading in the United States. 
The tremendous growth of commerce in the far West 
during the past few years has made the demand for this 
new route greater than ever, and the steady increase of 
transcontinental travel and transportation of freight 
promises that the road will have plenty of business before 
it. With all the latest improvements in the fittings and 
outfits of its cars, the Western Pacific, with its allied lines 
will offer to both traveler and shipper advantages of 
peculiar value. 



Senator La Follette. of Wisconsin, cultivates hope 

and expectancy. When asked if he did not think Roosevelt 
is the only man who could defeat Bryan he said : " Yes. 
as things look now. But things are likely to change 
very much in the next two years." Then he measured 
himself in the mirror and smiled. Patriotism and get- 
there Eli are twin brothers in some folk. 






LETTER 




VDNOBILE 



-/ i 



The irtfil in i 1 

i)i.- maritime codi n ■atomoh robjeci 

ihnt has 1m-.ii discussed si length l>v the local drivers. 
Then be no doubt but that the scheme will l*. 

adopted, .1- most of the automobiles' Bide li{ 
little •■ of an ornament, as the big searchlight 

lamps light np the road. 

These ride lights could carry red and green Ugh 
does , and with the adoption of a set of 

rules of il milar to those used al sea, many col- 

lisions could be averted. 

The true value of the scheme will not be obtained until, 
like the international rules of the road of a, it is 

adopted universally by all the countries of the world. 

In some foreign countries, ii is proper to turn to the 
left, while in the United States users of the highways turn 
to the right, s.i well denned are the maritime rules of 
the road that there is never a collision where vessels are 
risible to one another for any distance. This would also 
be the case with Hie automobile if there was a similar Bet 
of rules governing the automobiles on the highways. 

Ar the present time, those using automobiles use any 
Bide of the road thai suits their fancy, cutting in and 
across automobiles going in the same and opposite direc- 
tions in a way that is not only decidedly dangerous to 
themselves, but also to those in the other automobiles. All 
the collisions np to the present have boon caused, princi- 
pally, by the misunderstanding of the way the other au- 
tomobile is going to turn when two meet on the road. [f 
there is an international set of rules to be used on the 
mads it will do away with all this misunderstanding, and 
save many lives. The rules will be of little use, however, 
if they are not international in nature. 

The scheme, although an individual proposition at the 
beginning has now assumed the importance of an inter- 
national affair, and should come up before the proper de- 
partment at Washington that govern the highways. The 
officers of the Automobile Club of California should give 
the scheme consideration, and at the annual meeting, soon 
to be held, appoint, a committee on the scheme to work 
with those in the East to bring the matter before the 
United States Government. 

At the present time, a set of these lights is being used 

by Captain Comstoek, of the Fire Underwriters Patrol. 

The Captain traveled on the sea for years before he took 

up saving property, and the idea forced its way on him 

as he knew the value of it on the great water highways. 
* * * 

The United States Government has taken up the auto 
truck in most every branch of the service. Nearly all the 
big army posts of the East are supplied with trucks for 
carrying tools, supplies and all sorts of war-time instru- 
ments. These cars have every attachment for the use of 
the army. The postal service is also provided with auto 
wagons for carrying the mails, and in some places they 
are used in the rural delivery. One interesting test was 
made recently at Detroit, where a car is being used be- 
tween two points four and a half miles apart. The car 
made forty-five trips a week, and had a gasoline consump- 
tion of one gallon to every 10.88 miles. The total mileage 
for the twenty-three days of the test was 1314 miles. The 
total cost of repairs was slightly over seven dollars. Fig- 
uring this with the cost of gasoline and oil, it was found 
that the expenses were much less than the keeping of a 
h.a.i'se..an.cL.wagon,. and the service has been made perma- 
nent. 



lined in tueiin .Rvo new 1 
not luke long in brim: i( np T 

ind nmrk that tl fflcors of the dub 

di •• the ' lub wai 

m in their annual n 
the office of tin Dating 

committee to send in in report before the annual m 
can be .ailed. President Schwerin is desirous of holding 
this meeting, and has sent for the report ,.f the committee. 

\ request has also been -in t.. Douglass Watson 
report of the runs and tour committee. Mr. Watson says 
that he is net at the bend of the runs coi ittee, but 

thai bi< brother. A. B. WatBOn, is the leading spirit of thai 

committee. Secretary Fry thinks thai Douglass Watson 

was appointed. In the meantime, there is no reporl 

ing fnun the committee, and many of the local automobil- 

ists who would like to meet tlie other members of the club 

on a run are deprived of the pleasure. 

With bo many new members coming into the club, the 

-ly of holding a run a* BOOn as possible, so that they 

may become acquainted, is most apparent. The present 
conditions of the are such that with a little active 

work in b way thai the public can see. ih,- results will do 
a great deal toward the advancement of the club. 

* * * 

The contest for the Glidden Cup is on in the East. 

Seine sevenl v-|i\e aiitoinobi list s are slriviii" to win the 

trophy. It is one of the mosi importani events of the year, 
and the maker of the machine that carries off the trophy 
will know that his machine has been given a beat thai can- 
not be repeated under ordinary circumstances, 

Glidden himself is doing a lot for the automobile. No! 

only is his cup bringing out the best that the makers can 

put forth, but he himself, personally, is eonduetiiv a tour 
of fifty thousand miles through fifty countries that will 



w 



E have sold 33 1-3 percent, of the 
Automobile Tires purchased in the 
United States for the season of 1906 
to date. 

(The other 66 2-3 per cent, was divided among (en other manufacturers.) 

Yet even this enormous output was not 
sufficient to enable us to fill all our orders 
for 

Ifetmnni 

Wrapped Tread Tires 

without delays, as customers who have 
been obliged to wait can testify. We are 
now equipped to make 300 more tires per 
day than ever before. 

That fact is our guarantee TO YOU that 
we can now fill your orders promptly. 

THE DIAMOND RUBBER COMPANY, 
Akron, Ohio. 

Oakland Branch— 108, 110, 112 Telegraph Ave. 
Branches in all the principal cities. 



26 



SAX FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, WOO 



bring the motor car before many rulers that must appre- 
ciate the advantages of the civilized world. Not only 
that, but he is also storing up a knowledge that some dav 
may be of advantage to our country. This was seen by 
his late visit to Japan, when he observed how Japan was 
working to control the trade in the Far East. 

Ri'nil '//-Minlc Garotjes. 

The Bay Counties Portable House Company, located at 
114 Market street. San Francisco, is doing a rushing 
business in portable houses and it has been found that 
these convenient and speedily erected garages, in these 
days of scarcity of labor and lumber, are a boon to the 
owners of automobiles. A splendid automobile house, 
perfectly dry, with double walls, weighs only 2500 

pounds, and can be erected in an incredibly short time. 

« * * 

Tin' Geo. P. Moore Company, formerly of 596 Golden 
Gate Ave. has opened permanent headquarters at 721 
Golden Gate Ave. where they now occupy the entire two 
story building and carry the most complete line of auto- 
mobile accessories, automobile clothing and robes and 
general supplies to be found on the Pacific Coast. 

Without doubt, the Geo. P. Moore Company have one 
of the most artistically arranged business establishments 
ever established in this city. Their temporary quarters 
in the City of Oakland are at No. 31 T 10th St. They have 
leased the Knights of Pythias Bldg. at 12th and Alice 
Sts. where they will open up permanent headquarters for 
the accommodation of their customers across the bay. 

In addition to these two establishments, this company 
has a large store at 1005 So. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
and at 332 Broadway, New York. At their Eastern of- 
fice their buyer is located, with instructions to obtain the 



latest and best high class novelties in the automobile ac- 
cessories line that are placed on the market. The S. F. 
headquarters contain the most efficient and up-to-date 
charging plant in the United States. Visitors are al- 
ways welcome, and great pride is taken in showing them 
through the place. Mr. Moore is a man of unusual energy 
and business ability and to this fact is due the great suc- 
cess achieved by the George P. Moore Co. 



THEY RISE AGAIX. 
Ii took but a few days after the late unpleasantness for 
two will known shoe firms '(Rosenthal's Inc., formerly 
107-113 Kearny St. and the Rightway Shoe Co., success- 
ors In Nolan Bros. Shoe Co.. formerly S12-814 Market 
St.) to find new locations. These prominent leaders in 
the shoe business have opened the two largest and most 
perfectly appointed shoe stores in Greater San Francisco, 
viz.. at 1518-1530 Fillmore St. near O'Farrcll and on the 
northeast corner of Van Ness Ave. and Geary St., both 
firms doing business jointly in both establishments. The 
writer, who visited these beautiful stores, was agreeably 
surprised at the enterprise of these two so well and favor- 
ably known linns and their Phoenix like rising. We be- 
speak for them that same and in fact greater popularity 
in the future that has been their good fortune in the 
past. 



.1 8TRIKE ON THE JUMPER. 

The report is curreni again that another strike of rich 
ore has been made in the old Jumper mine of Tuolumne 
county. I'mlrr the new mine manager, if the ore holds out, 
the unfortunate shareholders will have a chance to re- 
i rieve some of their losses. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



America's Model Hotel 

European Plan 

The New Annex 

on Union Square 

With 200 Outside Rooms is 

Now Open 

The famous Grill Room under 
the same Chef is again in opera- 
tion. The best place to meet 
your friends and business asso- 
ciates for luncheon. 



Let your Eastern friends know of these desirable accommodations. 






IKK 



'. T tth.tr. wb.. for 
hid lin«' fortv 

i>t Linn. Ii ami pnrehai 

\\ inton. Ifi 



W 



The pan) lasi 

Mr. W. 11. Wil- 
liMin-. at 'l.i. oma, 11 n. « V 
Touring Car. Mr. Williams 
thai the automobile buai- 
■I the Northwest i- on the 
increase and claims foi 'I 
and vicinity thi ids of 

any section in the United States. 
The roads are perfectly level for 
a distance of 200 miles, the soil 
i ivrl and makes an 
ideal road for country touring. 



Mr. A. L. Hawley has just re- 
turned from a tour to I.os An- 
geles in his model "K" Winton 
Touring Car. The running 
time to I.os Angeles was thirty- 
one hours and the return trip was 
niaclr in twfiity-rij.'ht hours. Mr. 

Sawley had no trouble whatso- 
ever with his ear. He stated 
that the roads are in fine con- 
dition. 



Mr. W. D. Swan, of Merced, 
last week purchased from the 
Pioneer Automobile Company 
a model "S" Olds runabout. 
This is the machine which Mr. 
Calvin C. Eib recently drove up 
Twin Peaks. The Pioneer peo- 
ple are receiving orders almost 
daily for machines of this type, 
but the demand for same is so 
great all over the country, that 
the Factory is unable to fill all 
the orders. 



Model 14 



Sl,"0 



Mr. Stuart Fisher, the well 
known auto enthusiast, who has 
owned a number of cars, has just 
placed his order with the Pio- 
neer Automobile Company for a 
30 horse-power model "S" Olds- 
mobile Touring Car. Though 
not a Missourian, Mr. Fisher be- 
lieves in the "show-me" adage 
and, after investigating the vari- 
ous makes of automobiles on the 
market, decided that the model 
"S" Olds was the car he wanted. 
His machine will be geared for 
fast road work. Very shortly 
titter the arrival of the ear, Mr. 
Fisher will make a tour to Los 
Angeles, making the trip leisure- 
ly, stopping at all interesting 
places enroute. 




^^tav* 



THE CAR. THAT IS RIGHT 
in Design, Material and Workmanship. 

The highest possible grade of material, handled according to ihc design of skilled and experienced engineers, by expert 
mechanics in the largest and most thoroughly equipped automobile factor)' in the world. 

There is no part baaed on guess work or on what the other fellow dors, and the costly experimental work is done in the fac 
tory and not by the purchaser. 

It is RIGHT in the beginning. RIGHT when delivered and stays RIGHT all the time. 

These arc the features of primary importance but the facilities of our enormous factory enable us (o give you 

The Right Car at the Right Price 

Demonstration by appointment 

Thomas B. Jeffery <Sb Company 



31 Sanchez Street, 



San Francisco, California 



COLUMBIA 



24-28 Horse Power 



At Readville, Mass., races last month won the ten-mile handicap 
event for stock cars, beating ten other machines of leading makes 

"In winning this race the Columbia lived up to its great reputation of a year ago, '--Boston Herald, 

ABUNDANCE OF SPEED AND POWER 

Another car of the same model, stripped, made the fastest mile of any 
stock car, irrespective of size or power, during ihe Readville races. 

Middleton Motor-Car Co. GoLnGL N lve.5rFrancis e co r 



Mrs. F. W. Bradley, of Oak- 
land, is enjoying her model "S" 
Oldsmobile immensely. This car 
has made many miles in Ala- 
meda and the bay counties, and 
has given no trouble whatsoever. 



TRICYCLE, COMPANYS 
InvSf^iloHing Chairs 

T»M> TRICYCLE CHAIRS 

for the cJiSMcd are the icmc nf perfect.™ 

2018 Market St., San'Francisco, California 

837 South Spring St., Loi Angerei 



AUTO TIPS 

SAN JOSE — Hotel Vendome. Rendezvous for 
automobiles. Bathing pavilion; commodious 
garage; gasoline at all hours. 

FOR gasoline, sundries ana repairs at San 
Jose stop at Letcher's Automobile Garage, 
corner First and St. James. Tel. Main 303. 

LOS OLIVOS— Hotel Los Olivos. Midway be- 
tween Santa Barbara ana San Luis Obispo. 
First-class in all respects; auto parties run- 
ning between San Francisco and Los Angeles 
all stop here. Good shooting and fishing dur- 
ing seasons. 



HEADQUARTERS— 

Automobile Clothing (or Men and Women 
ROOS BROS. 
Goggles, Hoods, Robes, Etc. Fillmore and O'Farrell St 



38 



SAN 



AKCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 190(3 




The Dollar vs. Six Bits. 

The atmosphere in insurance circles is clearing; facts 
hitherto unknown are coming to light. As adjustments 
of losses progress, but little reliance can be placed in the 
published lists of companies settling losses in full, and 
those seeking to evade their obligations. Interesting in- 
formation has been obtained as to the circumstances thai 
brought about the proposition to make a Hal reduction. 
the vote on which caused certain companies to be desig- 
nated as Dollar-for-Dollar and others as Six-Bit Com- 
panies. 

A month ago conditions were chaotic: companies hail 
lost their records; managers were awaiting instructions: 
the catastrophe demanded action beyond the authority of 
local management and decision could be reached only sub- 
ject to the approval of the directors of the Companies 
American and foreign. 

Banks were unable to determine the value of insurance 
policies, held or offered them as collateral security, or on 
the reliability of which the solvency of the borrowers might 
depend. A critical condition demanded radical action. 
The question to be decided was the best plan to pursue- 
in the interest of San Francisco. After considering a 
number of suggestions, which failed to promise relief, 
bankers, merchants and property owners suggested that if 

a plan for sp ly payment of losses could be devised. 

claimants would probably be glad to meet the companies in 
a spirit of concession. Willi this in view a meeting of 
the adjusting bureau was held at Reeds Hall. Oakland, 
June 12th and a motion was adopted to the effect that the 
companies agree to pay their losses immediately, and in 
cash, at * 5 per cent of the face value of their policies. 

This meeting was executive, and it was agreed that no 
publicity be given the proceedings unless the plan met 
with the approval of the bead offices of the Companies. 

Without awaiting confirmation or rejection of this plan, 
certain managers in the apparent hope of advancing their 
interests, and at the expense of their confreres, made pub- 
lie the proceedings through the press of San Francisco. 
Not satisfied with anticipated results, they fostered the 
spirit of bitterness which the newspaper accounts engen- 
dered by sending misleading circulars broadcast through- 
out the country and granting interviews to newspapers cal- 
culated to further inflame the public mind. 

The managers in favor of speedy settlements realized 
the advantage which had been taken of them, and recom- 
mended the abandonment of the proposition before action 
had been taken by their Companies. Adjusl men! of losses 
was then resumed on the basis of the New York agreement 
subscribed to by all Companies. Investigation lias shown 
that distinction in settlements cannot: be traced to the vote 
cast at the meeting at Reeds Hall. As is generally the 
case Companies are paying their losses in accordance with 

their past records. 

* * * 

St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company. 

The St. Raul Fire & Marine Insurance Company is 
making for itself a most enviable reputation : it has already 
paid out five hundred thousand dollars up to July 1st 
on its San Francisco losses, and at that date still had 
about four hundred thousand in the bank, and expected 
to be able to complete its entire settlements in San Fran- 
cisco without disposing of any securities or without bor- 
rowing any money. 



Many companies of course have been compelled to call 
in additional capital or make assessments, but this com- 
pany has found itself in a position to meet its obligations 
quickly with cash, and as a result is getting a very large 
amount of new business, from which its Marine Agents, 
M. ('. Harrison & (H.. 208 Merchants' Exchange, as well 

as its Fire Department are profiting. 

* * * 

Safe Insurance. 

Commissioner Wolf, in view of his recent experience 
is opening fire upon the present insurance laws. He says: 
" 'I be insurance laws of this State need a sweeping re- 
vision. They are too general to be efficient. I believe 
thai California will take an attitude towards fire insur- 
ance companies similar to that N'ew York has been tak- 
ing towards the life insurance corporations. An investi- 
gation and re\ ision of the laws are necessary for the pro- 
tection of the policy-holders." A ng the reforms sug- 
gested by tin' Commissioner is one that the companies 
should be required to deposit a sum of money in the 
State as evidence of good faith, and the amount of two 

hundred thousand dollars enforced in New York is sug- 
' gested. 

These suggestions, though valuable and indeed neces- 
sary, will not compare for general utility with the pro- 
posal made by the News Letter for the enforcement of 
a standard policy. A simple and easily understood policy 
of universal application in this State would be of the 
greatest value to tin- insurer. No doubtful company 
would contract under it. That, coupled with the sug- 
gestion of the Commissioner to compel a deposit to protect 
the insurer in the event of litigation would make the 
insurance future absolutely safe. 
* * * 

]\'il]iinil Discount. 

ft is with a great deal of pleasure that record is made 
of any company that, through its agents, is making an 



George Heazelton 
Edward H. Kramer 
J. W. Garthwaite 
Henry D. Walker 
T. W. Tetley 



Heazelton & Co. 



BOND BROKERS 



Kohl Building, 



San Fr 



Bonds of Absolute Security 

to net from 

4 1-2 to 6 Per Cent 












- 

nil ill 
d dcductii 

"•iii- ■ * l«ank ■!] hi. I 

ird ami will undoubtedly materially in- 
inpany in the futun \ 
indard 
company, like the Aetna, is worth; 
nition. And tin- fact that no advantage was taken of tlio 
manner, to their financial lose must bi 
recorded. The Aetna it one of the oldeal of thi 
companies in the United 9 id while ita policy in 

dealing with the San Francisco situation stands in relief, 
no departure from it- well established custom when- 
ever it has encountered a small or a largi 

* » » 

I /.'. marlcabh Fat >. 

A remarkable leveloped in conection with the 

Fnsurance Company of North America in its relation to 
the San Francisco fire. With t . 1905 

»ated in the neighborhood of $12,000,000 
and by it- report for the current year up to July 1st, 
1906, n i- shown that the assets amount to $13,076,- 
319.52, nfii r paying Us San Francisco losses, or 
one million in excess of the total assets al the time 
of the las! statement. This is a remarkable state 
of affairs and it goes to show the esteem in which this 
old Philadelphia Company is held by the public. The 
[nsurance Company of Xorth America was founded in 
1793 and has had 11-1 years of successful business ex- 
perience. Up to July 1st, 1906, it had paid a total of 
over $126,000,000 in losses. James D. Bailey is the very 
efficient general agent of this company. The offices of 
the Pacific Department will shortly he moved to the 
Monadnock Building, San Francisco. 

* * * 

Mutual Life Affairs. 

Mr. Richard A. McCurdy is to be sued to account for 
$2,000,000 of the policyholders money, in the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, disbursed through the "yellow 
dog fund'' during his regime. This is the second suit 
brought against its former president, his son Robert, and 
his son-in-law, Lewis A. Thebau, by the company. 

H. H. Rogers and John D. Rockefeller are said to have 
severed all connection with the Mutual Company, owing 
to the fact that such connection was being used to preju- 
dice the public against the present directorate. 

* * * 

The Earthquake Clause. 

The clause is a poor bulwark for the Companies to 
skulk behind and defy the insured and it will be shown 
later that from a legal standpoint and from the standpoint 
of equity it is not worth the paper it is written on. There 
are a number of decisions of record that make it useless 
to the welchers. From the standpoint of equity the 
stalking policy is an indefensible one. 

Judge Morrow's Court. 

The Williamsburg City is reported as trying to delay 
matters by causing suits, if for more than $2000 to bo 
brought in the Federal courts. Judge W. W. Morrow is 
quoted as follows, on the subject of congestion in his 
department : 

"It is not my intention," said Judge Morrow, questioned 
on this matter, "to let the business of this Court become 
unmanageable by sheer accumulation. If the insurance 
suits are transferred here they will receive systematic and 
adequate attention. Nor do I intend that the other busi- 
ness which should come before this court shall be side- 



I 

; 
■ 

ir is still ■ 
shall . from (hi 

i 

i 

i i it will nm my privilege, but mj 

duly, under the law." 

• • • 

The insurance oner, Mr. Wolf, is 

n In tcntion thai "the insurance laws <>f this 

noed revision." He is quoted as follows: 
"The insurance lavi State Deed a -■ 

vision. They ai neral i" be efficient 1 believe 

that California will take an attitude toward fire ins 

companies similar to thai New ¥ork has I n taking 

toward life insurance corporations. An ir in and 

the la»~ are necessary for the protection "f the 
policy-holdi 

Mr. Wolf holds thai the Califo are vague and 

Mr. Wolf is asked to devise a standard policy and to bring 
all companies doing business in California under us re- 
strictions, [nsurance laws should be amended and 

changed so thai the 1 companies shall be required to in- 
vesi their surplus in California securities to the exteni of 
the amount of business in premiums dime in the State on 
a reasonable percentage of the total writing for the pro- 
tection of policv holders. 

* * * 

.1 Removal. 

The Firemen's Fund [nsurance Corporation has re- 
moved I" San Francisco to quarters in its old location. 

New roof and Boors have I n put on the building and 

the old reliable California company is ready to meet its 
old friends and new patrons. Pleasure is being expressed 
by polity holders with the polite and generally satisfactory 
manner with which this company is handling its settle- 
ments of loss. 



Grand Prix 

Paris 1900 

Legion of Honor 



These exalted awards are higher honors than were ever 
taken in the piano industry of the world, and are official evi- 
dence of the superiority of 





w lal&uiin p 



tauo 





The Grand Prize 
St. Louis 1904 



D. H. Baldwin (tb Co. 

have on sale a complete stock of their Grands and Uprights 
at their warerooms, 2512-14 Sacramento St., San Francisco. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



July 21, 1906 




Radke Building, Van Ness avenue and Bush street. 



TEE NEW BADZE BUILDING. 

Radke & Company, the prominent jewelers and silver- 
smiths, formerly of Sutter street, between Montgomery 
and Kearny, and of Geary street, between Kearny and 
Grant avenue, have fitted up elegant quarters in the 
new Radke building, mi Van Ness and [lush, wliieh is pic- 
tured above. 

Radke & Company are energetic, progressive native 
sons of California, and this energy and progressiveness has 
been best exemplified by the rapidity with which they have 
again become established in business. They are also put- 
ting up another building on Van Ness avenue. Young 
blood will tell, and it is the young blood that is writing 
the history of New San Francisco, and foremost among 
the younger generation is Radke & Company. 

R. P. Hurlbut has been for twenty-five years a well- 
known contractor and builder in San Francisco. He has 
just completed the lug Radke building on Van Ness 
avenue and Bush street. This was the first ollice building 
to be opened for occupancy in the New San Francisco. 
Mr. Hurlbut has an unrivaled reputation as a builder 
in the city by the Golden Gate, and in fact all over 
California, lie is the builder of the famous Forsyth 
steel building in Fresno, costing $250,000, and he enjoys 
holding the record of quick construction in this class if 
building. The Forsyth structure was erected in the shorl 
space of six months. The Radke building was put up in 
thirty days* time. Hurlbut is the builder of the Phenix 
building (the first three-story block to go up in San 
Francisco since .the fire) at the corner of Tan Ness avenue 
and Ellis, and the Delbert Block, at the coiner of Van 
Ness and O'Farrell; also many other buildings now un- 
der construction in San Francisco. Mr. Hurlbut's build- 
ing force is equipped with all the latest and most im- 
proved modern appliances for rapid construction. 



.1 MODERN CROESUS. 

The death of Alfred Biet, head of the great London 
(louse of Allied Biet & Co., will be lamented by many 
who knew him personally and benefitted by his open- 
handed generosity. Money rolled in on him during the 
latter portion of his life from his South African invest- 
ments, and be became one of the great inonied kings of 
the earth. With all his wealth there was no ostentation 
about the man. and to old friends and acquaintances he 
was always the same kind hearted genial friend, at all 
limes gentle and thoughtful of those in his service, from 
the highest to the lowest in rank. The dispatches es- 
timate his wealth at from $185,000,000 to $150,000,000. 
This may be correct, but far below the figures given 
a lew years ago in a London financial paper which quoted 
the amount of his fortune at as much, if not more, in 
pounds sterling. Leaving the exact calculations of his 
wealth out of all consideration. Mr. Biet died one of the 
riches! — if not the riches! — men in the world. 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 
FIRE PROOFING 

ROOFING TILE TERRA GOTTA PRESSED BRICK 

Vitrified and Terra Gotta Pipe 



EDDY and HYDE STS., San Francisco. 
Works: Lincoln, Cal. 






SA.N Kl!\\, 



SI 



THE til) <>l PARIS 

than half a century ago, that grail -Irv 

• f the 

r. m the mid.] 

v and K 
>id mid Kubstantial 

Lhal it has 
: t.. make several moves into mon 
i|iiart.-rs. as indicated by the accompanying intei 

in, win. )i ;..,! i, v 

the gn \|> n |. The Brm mis burned oul bj 

the Are, l.iit within ■ f.» -opened, with a new, 

up-to-date stock, at its preeenl One location, at the south- 

orner of Van Ness avenue and Washington street 



• 'IP 

jB / 

OTpffi 1 

QDDB0BDDDU-. 
□DDDL ' 



The curve here represented shows in a marked manner 
the movement of the City of Paris Dry Goods Company, 
connecting it closely with the march of the fine retail trade 
in San Francisco, during the past half century. 

The chart shows the first location on Sacramento 
street, thence to Kearny, Clay, Montgomery, Geary, to 
the present ideal retail situation on Van Ness at Wash- 
ington; completing the half circle and all the time under 
the management of one of the three generations of the 
original family. 

A strange fact in connection with the different re- 
movals, was that this house from beginning to end, was 
always the pioneer of the locality where they settled, and 
were speedily followed by the higher class of retail 
houses — even in their last enforced flight. 



CHAS. MEINECkl: 
& COMPANY 

Importers 



Tempi nary Offices: 



_ 



1003 1-2 BROADWAY 

OAKLAND 



ROOM 15 



.1 CONVENIENT CAFE. 
The water front has been without a cafe until this 
Detjen and Meyer, the well known caterers, 
erlj connected with the German Bakery and Restaurant 
of Markel and Spear streets, supplied the want last Mon- 
day, i.\ opening one of the finest rates in the city at i; 
Market street, eorner of Steuart, where ladies and gentle- 
men will be courteously and promptly served. The open- 
ing of this cafe was one of the events of the week and as 
each day goes by the convenience of this cafe on the front 
will be proven by an increased attendance. The cuisine is 
line and the service is prompt. Absolute cleanliness pre- 
vails. 



.1 FORTUNATE CIRCUMSTANCE. 
A fortunate circumstance connected with the San Fran- 
cisco conflagration, affecting both the general public and 
the corporation most directly concerned was the location 
of the silk mills of Carlson Currier Co., at Petalurna, Cali- 
fornia, and their ability to resume the manufacture of 
spool silks within a week, after the catastrophe. Their 
production of silk threads was a vital necessity in the 
manufacture of all articles of wearing apparel made by 
tailors, dressmakers and cloak manufacturers. They have 
been working at the full capacity of their large mills, and 
successfully supplying the demands of the immense trade 
covering the entire Pacific Coast and Australia, in addi- 
tion to the immediate requirements of the local trade. We 
present in this issue of the News Letter an illustration giv- 
ing a view of the temporary quarters erected for Carlson 
t inner Company, within the burned district, at 408 and 
410 Polk street, and occupied by them as executive offices 
and salesrooms. 



fsjjw^jissn. 




Polk street, Between McAllister and Golden Gate avenue 



32 



SAN PEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 190G 



II. H. BANCROFT & CO. 

A boy in a Buffalo bookstore, Mr. Bancroft, at the ago 
of nineteen was sent by his employer to establish himsel !' 
in San Francisco. Opening business in 1856 in the 
Naglee Building, at Montgomery and Merchant streets, 
then the center of the finance and trade of the Pacific 
Coast. Mr. Bancroft paid in rents during the fifteen years 
thai followed a sum equivalent to twice the value of the 
property at the present day. 

Erecting a spacious building to meet his enlarged re- 
quirements, Mr. Bancroft moved to Market street in 1871, 
and there developed the largest combined mercantile and 
manufacturing, wholesale and retail, book, stationery and 
publishing business in the world. This building was 
burned in 1880. and the present History Building anise 
in its stead, and was burned in its turn in the late fire. 
It is to be replaced at once by a still more elegant struc- 
ture. The History Company and the Bancroft Company 
were then incorporated, the latter continuing to the pres- 
ent time in New York City as publishers of high-grade 
art works, one of the most popular at present boinsr "The 
Book of Wealth," at. .$2,500 a copy. 

Meanwhile, from the first, Mr. Bancroft became in- 
terested in Western American history, and for a period 
of forty years devoted much of his time to collecting a 
library of 60,000 volumes and writing and publishing a 
series of histories in 39 volumes. The library has since 
passed into the possession of the State University at 
Berkeley. 

Three sons succeed to Mr. Bancroft's honors and emolu- 
ments, to which each will add his quota, and pass the in- 
creased heritage on to his descendants, for each is 
already so well established in thrift and integrity as to 
make his fortune a matter of no uncertainty. All three 
are graduates of Harvard, of good ability and native ap- 
plication. Immediately after completing his college 
course, Paul Bancroft built and successfully organized 
and equipped St. I'unstan's, and has since entered upon 
the business of real estate in San Francisco. Grifnng 
Bancroft is a lawyer in San Diego, having in charge the 
family's landed interests in that county. Philip Bancroft 
is a member of the progressive law firm of Hewlett, Ban- 
croft and Ballantine, with offices in the Monadnoek 
Building. 









Writing always in sight. 


L. 


& M. 


ALEXANDER & CO. 




L 


0. 


EXCLUSIVE PACIFIC coast DEALERS 

Smith S Bros. Typewriter 




^& RECENT SALES: 








jSSjjfiF w ""'■' ■'■ Sl.iiANl, ,y in 
tS IuJI AW1I.O ' \l.in>KM\S HANK 
J \j£A Si'AM>MU> 111], CO, 
^A^T ' M"N II 1 M.IUI'II III 
^P UNION TRUST BANK 


L. 
1820 Fill 


Send For Descriptive Catalogue. 

& M. ALEXANDER & CO. 
more street, San Francisco 



Imperial $3.00 Hats 

COL/MAN'S HAT STORE 

1101 Fillmore street 1809 Fillmore street 

Van Ness Ave. and Post street. 



Geo.P. Moore Co. 

AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES 



Oakland Branch: 

377 Tenth Street; 

Los Angeles Branch: 

1005 South Main Street; 

72 1 Golden Gate Avenue, 

San Francisco. 



Direct from the mine 
to the Consumer 



Stanford - Richmond 



Best Grade Australian House Coal 

NO ASH OR CLINKER 

Minimum of Soot and Most Economical 
in Every Way. 



Richmond Coal Company 

Importers 













Hi.- Fhoenlx Desk and Furniture Company (Ed. M. Moore, proprietor) was (be Arst 
exclusive office furniture house In Greater San Francisco, No. :<' Van Nes 
Market Office furniture and tut) laity. 



R Fillmore 
.t. 

O'Farrell 

\S Van Ness 



at. 



o 



Bush 

About, August, I5th 



S BROS. 



WESTERN UNION. 

The following statement exhibits the condition of the 
company ;it the close of the quarter ended March 31, 
1906: Surplus January 1. 1900, as per las! quarterly re- 
port, $16,738,355.61; net revenues quarter ended March 
31, 1906, $1,469,158.62; total $18,207,514.23. Finn, whirl, 
appropriating for dividends of l 1 ^ per cent paid April 16', 
1906, $1,217,022.50; interest on bonded debt $331,300, a 
total of $1,548,322.50, shows a surplus March 31, 1900, 
of $16,659,191.73. The net revenues of the quarter end- 
ing June 30, inst, based upon nearly completed returns 
foi April, partial returns for May and estimating the 
business for June, will be about 1,750,000, making a 
total of 18,409,191.73. From which appropriating for 
interest on bonded debt, 331,300, leaves 18,077,891.73. 
It requires for a dividend of 1^4 per cent on capital stock 
issued, 1,217.022.50; deducting which leaves a surplus 
after paying dividend of 10,800,869.23. 

A dividend of lVi per cent on the capital stock of 
this company was payable on and after the 16th day of 
July to stockholders of record at the close of the transfer 
I inoks on the 20th day of June inst. 



OBITUARY. 

Mrs. Alfred Lee Brewer, mother of \Y. A. Brewer, 

the principal of St. Matthews School at San Mateo, died 
las! week. Mrs. Brewer was a very intellectual and 
capable woman and a well beloved member of the school's 
faculty. She had given forty years, of a very useful life, 
to the cause of education. Her passing away is mourned 
bv a host of friends. 



General R. H. YY'arfield, well known throughout Cali- 
fornia because of his long and honorable career as Briga- 
dier General of the First Brigade, State National Quard, 
was accidentally killed at Mill Valley, this week. General 
Warfield was one of the noted men of San Francisco and 
his recent appointment to the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners was a fitting testimonial to his worth as a citizen. 
Genera] Warfield was formerly manager of the California 
Sotel and, at the time of his death, was vice-president of 
the Mount Tamalpais and Mill Valley Scenic R. R. Co. 
and manager of the Tamalpais Tavern. 



The Grill 



C.M.SOLLARI 
Proprietor 

Formerly of Palace Hotel Grill 

911 ELLIS STREET, NEAR VAN NESS c^tVE. 



Now Open 

Duplicating the Palace Grill Service 



Alfred £. Blake, M. D. 

Diseases of the Mouth and Teeth 

Office Hours, 8:30 to 9:30 cA- M.; 2:00 to 3:30 P. M. 

Office- 1703 O'Farrell St.,cor. Fillmore.San Francisco 

TELEPHONE WEST 4003. 



— SUMMER RESORTS — 

Require 

TENNIS RACKETS, BASEBALL GOODS 
FISHING TACKLE AND SHOTGUNS 

There's everything you need at 

BRITTAIN ®> CO., Inc. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
VAN NESS AVE. and TURK ST. 



34 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906 



A PIONEER LITHOGRAPHING FIRM. 
Britton and Rey are pioneers in the lithographic 
printing line, having been established in San Francisco 
about the year 1850. This business, from a comparatively 
small beginning, has steadily increased since that time, 
keeping pace with every succeeding change and improve- 
ment in lithographic an. Hank and commercial en- 
graving has been made a specialty and in this line t In- 
firm turns nut work that is as line as any executed any- 
where in the United States or Europe. Tbree of the 
latest design lithographic presses, of the largest kind, are 
now in operation at the fool id' Hay sheet under the man- 
agement of Mr. V. J. A. Rey, son of Pioneer Key. The 
firm is noted as turning out splendid color lithographs 
as wed as commercial engraving and planting, ami it is 
due to the foresight and great executive ability of Mr. 
V. J. A. Rev that San Francisco possesses a lirsl class es- 
tablishment of this character so SOOH after all the litho- 
graphic simps of the city were completely gutted by the 
fire. Britton and Rey are deserving of thanks from the 
San Francisco public as there was an immediate scarcity 
of stock blanks and certificates which is was necessary In 
replace by new issues and the firm is now crowded to the 
greatest extent to furnish the missing necessities in busi- 
ness procedure in engraved letter heads, cards and other 
utilities. This class of work is being turned out 
promptly to the satisfaction of all patrons. 



"The Grill" is the name given one of the best of the new 
cafes in San Francisco. This is located at 911 Ellis 
street, near Van Xess. and it is in charge of Mr. C. M. 
Sollavi. long and favorably known by patrons of the old 
Palace Hotel Grill. Mr. Sollari aims to duplicate the 
sen ice that made the Palace Grill famous the world over. 



A SPLENDID RECORD. 

The Tubbs Cordage Company has a record of over 
fifty years in the rope manufacturing business. This 
firm was organized and commenced the manufacture of 
cordage in 1856 3 under the name of the San Francisco 
Cordage Company, with offices on Front street and a rope 
walk in the Potrero. 

As Messrs. A. L. and Hiram Tubbs were the prime 
movers in the new enterprise and its largest owners, the 
name was changed early in the '60's to the present 
designation, and the ownership of the company still re- 
mains in their children; Alfred S. Tubbs being Presi- 
dent. Win. B. Tubbs, Vice-President and ('has. W. Kel- 
logg, secretary: the latter having held the same office for 
over twenty-five years. 

When the rope walk was first erected the most modern 
machinery of that day was installed and since that time 
the company has adopted the same plan and few rope 
Factories in the United States to-day are its equal in 
equipmenl to-day. Its products have played a large 
share in the mining anil industrial development of Cali- 
fornia and the west generally and maintain the high 
standard which was given them half a century ago. 



THE POLICE COMMISSION. 
The resignation of Mr. Herbert E. Law from the 
Police Hoard is deeply to be regretted. Mr. Law, through 
his close connection with municipal affairs, would have 
made an ideal official. The sympathy of the public is 
with Mayor Sehmitz in the loss by death of General War- 
field and loss (by resignation) id' Mr. Law. on the same 
day. It is to be hoped that the 'Mayor may exercise the 
same wise discrimination in the selection of their suc- 
cessors. The Commission, as composed, had the entire 
confidence of the public. 



BALDWIN JEWELRY CO. 

will reopen 

SATURDAY, JULY 21st 

With New and Elegant Lines 

ON 

VAN NESS AVENUE 

AT SUTTER STREET 

With factory on the premises, employing only the most skilled workmen. 

You are INVITED TO INSPECT the most beautiful collection of precious gems, artistic jewels, all the newest 
productions of the silversmith's art, an immense importation of Parisian novelties in back combs, necklaces, brace- 
lets and bags, and a full line of real jades. 

<lA most complete assortment of POPULAR and STYLISH goods 
cAgents for all the best makes of Watches, Clocks and the celebrated ROGERS BROS. 1847 quadruple plate. 






HAN M. 1 lie 



TBS ORPH 

Pan N 

Orpheum I 
afternoon. II - woi i, inasmuch as he I 

livht that be 

them. II -it. li hamlv 

■lil articles a* fifty pound cannc i tw i 

hundred and fifty pound nnon, i- nl catches ■< 

twenty-five |x>iih-1 s)i.>i between the back of In* head and 
shoulders, on his neck, a> it i- Bred from a cannon. 
Arthur McWatl in and their clever little 

company will p spectacular mnaical comedy, en- 

titled "Vaudeville." The Camille Comedy Trio, triple 
horizontal bar eccentriques, will enliven proceeding! 
James P. Kelly and Annie Mabel Rent, a clever comedj 
couple, will offer a hodge-podge of singing and dancing, 
full of originality, life and ginger. Argyre Kastron, the 
talented and beautiful young Greek violiniste, will i 

lectiona and Carlin and Otto, the really amusing 
German comedians, will tell new stories and Bing new 
~->nir-- The Military Octette and the Girl wiih the 
Baton give, without doubt, the finest musical act ever 
seen in San Francisco, and they will appear for the lasl 
times. The Gartelle Brothers, comedy roller skaters, and 
Orpheum Motion Pictures, showing the latest novelties, 
will complete a varied and interesting programme. 



TO NEW YORK AND PARIS. 

Mesdames Bagnall and Boughton, the successors of 

E. E. Caswell of 88 Post Street, but now located at Grove 
and Tenth streets, Oakland, will leave for New York and 
Paris on August 8th, to make their selection of Fall and 
Winter styles of millinery. The two ladies' long experi- 
ence with Mrs. Caswell guarantees their selections as chic 
and up-to-date as well as, as far as possible, exclusive. 
Delicious taste and exquisite discrimination in selection 
has always been their characteristic. 



Orpheum 



M>HMt HI > i III n> 
IHt UtU. 



\»~K 



«i«t So*' Mm.. Mr 22 
• F*rrr ■!•» *s«*pi MtVKfKT- 

\ M l>l\ II 1 t WINNERS! 
P..I V • McWaan, T.-« mi .-..!• Canb CoaoMT. 

**•*» •* lni,, t J«w*. Ol|*MI. 

MM PActam »i»H U.l w*-k ft TW Ntifcur, Ottot* *nd Thr Cirf wilt, the B«|'« 

f~»»i I •-.! M<M. M>b>n. tam S.l U fd.r •ixt Smfer. I 'I 

»nd 2 '' 

Dm Tim. Boi Ofc. .1 Doka'i Dm Stan. Fmmtn • 

W~iti0O0. 



) Sunn Soma. Phoic. 



lllltl>.M/ , i«MH..U fimilO. m I.. m«li.„Kt. «ki.««» lOV^Kil- 



01 I! COVER. 

Wa\ bach in the earh '60'a the only way to deliver mail 

was i>\ the Ponj Express and the I. 8. mail was for- 
warded by relaj n ami leases across the 

ol Utah and the plains and mountains intervening 
between California and civilization by the means typified 
on the cover of this issue of the News Letter. 

Mr. Frederick Marriott conceived the News Letter in 
order to furnish to the outside world all the news, in 
epitome, of California. Owing to the long distances 
traveled and the weight of ordinary letter mail the Pony 
Express could not be burdened with the bulk and « 
of ordinary newspapers. 

The original News Letter was just what its name im- 
plies. Two pages of very line type, printed on very 
light blue paper, gave all the news of the day. The third 
page was left blank for the purpose of writing a letter. The 
fourth page was designed to fold over and space left on 
this wa> occupied by the address and postage stamp. One 
folded, il was handed into the care of the Pony Express 
riders, hardy men who braved the dangers of death from 
thirst on the desert, and attacks by Indians on the plains 
to bring to the East the latest authentic news from the 
wonderful western Eldorado. 

It was the intention of the management to present 
each reader with a facsimile of the original issue of the 
News Letter but the plates and the original copy were 
destroyed in the great fire. 



THE WHITE HOUSE 



Opening of their Spacious 



New Stores 

Monday, July 23, 1906 

N. W. Cor. Van Ness Ave. and Pine St*. 

Raphael Weill (§!> Co., Inc. 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 81. 1900 



THE OATMEAL DODGE. 
It reminds me of the oatmeal 



detective. He 
an ingenious 
been worked 
a shopkeeper. 



" the 
« The 



dodge, said the 

was speaking of 

swindle that had 

successfully on 

Ihe latmeal dodge, he eontin- 

tinued, was worked on a grocer 

in the suburbs. A man entered 

the simp and engaged the grocer 

in conversation. While they 

talked, a youth came in. 

■■ Do you sell oatmeal! 
new-comer asked. 

•■ Yes." said the grocer, 
very best How much " 

But the man interrupted. "1 

just wanted to know." he said. 

-day." And he walked out. 

The grocer, looking a little dis- 
appointed, resumed his conversa- 
tion with the stranger. In a few 
minutes a second youth appeared. 

"Do you sell oatmeal?"' he 
asked. 

" Yes." the grocer answered. 

"Thank you. Good-day." 

And this young man also dis- 
appeared. 

"Well, what the dickens." ex- 
claimed the grocer. '-'But. as we 
were saving." he resumed, and 
the interrupted conversation went 
briskly on. 

Soon a third youth entered the 
shop. He said : " 1 >o you sell 
oatmeal •" 

•• Yes." the grocer mapped. 

- Thank you. Good-day." 

And this young man departed 
(.n a run. Y«r the grocer, thor- 
oughly enraged at last, had 
rushed upon him. He had. how- 
ever, a clean pair of heels. The 
was unable to overtake 
him. So. after a chase of a hun- 
dred yards or so. he returned 
breathless. 

He found the first man gone. 
The shop was empty. So was the 
till. 

Once more the oatmeal dodge 
had succeeded. — Tid-Bits. 



Tool- a Shine io Hi in. 

Piggmus — I see that the cham- 
pion bootblack is dead. Dis 
mukes — Yes : death loves a shin- 
in? mark. 



•iged. 
" Springer couldn't "catch a 
pig in a three-foot allew" as they 
say." "No, indeed! And I un- 
derstand that in his childhood 
davs his father could use him for 
a boot-jack." 



Printer — Mr. Sullivan, sir. 
We've run out of ink. Foreman 
— All right. Schwartz, squeeze 
the office towel. 




The first insurance company that started u p in their old location on California street. 



Country Life 

Means health to mind and body 

SAN MATEO PARK 

Big villa lots. 100 foot front, $700. 

HAYWAR.D PARX 

Close to the Hayward home with its magnificent 
grounds, 60 foot lots $1100. 

HAYWARD ADDITION 

Near the village, near electric and steam cars, 50 
foot lots, $900. 

Street work, sewers and water. Come to San Mateo today 

FRANK S. GRUMMON. San Mateo Agent 

Baldwin CBb> Howell 

1692 Fillmore street 



The Maryland 

NOW OPEN 

Apartments or Rooms 
with private baths 

Page Street, near Laguna 

M. G. Lytton, Prop. 



FIRST 


in War 


FIRST 


in Peace 


FIRST 


in the Ruins of 'Frisco 




Briggs 




CHRONICLE BLDG. 


For 


a Good Smoke 












morn- 

■ if I hml 
Lbe middle "f the nighl f->r 

niv prnni 

v morning. 

I want to 11 rise 

I'll >lo it by a flank movement. 
I don't mind being ap in the 
morning. There's ■ difference 

.'.' " 

In speaking of the fight f"i 
governor Senator Shortridgi 
suiil : "It is all Pardee. The 
only serious opnonenl he had was 
myself, ami T withdrew early m 
a> not i" embarrass him. 

"I'm ..ui to return to th" 
Senate," he concluded. "If 
I should fnil to gel the regular 
nomination, I'd nominate myself 
nii.l nothing could stop me land- 
ing in Sacramento by the 
kiinl of a majority." 



FOUNDED 179J 



I , i- well known thai the Lord 
Chief .iii-i if of England used 
to siiiL r iii tho choir of Kensing- 
ton Parish Church. A lad] le 

asked tho verger to point out sir 
Richard Webster, as he then 
was. 

The verger replied: "Well. 
ma'am, that's the vicar, and 

them's the curates, and I'm the 
verger; bul as for the choir, as 
long as they docs their dooty we 
don't inquire into their hante- 

ccdciils '." 



She Was Dense. 

Some American visitors were 
being shown the treasures of the 
Sir .Tolin Soanc Museum. The 
curator said that a certain ex- 
hibit was "made in cork." One 
of the ladies of the party replied : 
" That is curious, for we are just 
going to visit some friends 
there." 

"I mean, madam," said the 
curator, "that this model was 
made out of cork." 

" That is still more curious, 
lor ran- friends live a little way 
out of Cork." 

He gave it up. — Tid-Bits. 



Knew Slang. 

Teacher — Now, Johnny, what 
was the cause of the American 
Eevolution ? Johnny — We had 
the spirit of '76 and the British 
had the spirit of 23.— New YorV 
Time ft. 



INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERIGA 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

SUMMARY OF CONDITION JULY 1,1906. 

\s«t s S13.076.319.52 

Poll, IJ -Holders' Surplus - - - 4.475,216.9? 

Net Premium Receipts first six months of 1906 - 3,582,307.56 

Such was the status of '"Old Reliable," July 1, 
L906, after allowing a sufficient sum to meet all 
outstanding losses at SAN FRANCISCO and else- 
where and all other liabilities. 

114 YEARS' SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS EXPERIENCE- 
LOSSES PAID TO JULY 1, 1906, OVER $126,000,000! 

Office Pacific Department, Monadnock Building, San Francisco. 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



OFFICES, DESK ROOM AND STORES TO RENT 

MARKET STREET, BETWEEN THIRD AND FOURTH 
in the new 

Midway Office Building 

Under Construction, to be Completed July- 15th. 
Single or double offices, 10x10, 10x20 and 12x20. 
Desk room 10x10. 
Stores 20x64. 

Apply on premises, or to 

THOMAS MAGEE & SONS Real Estate Agents 

5 MONTGOMERY STREET 



The Accessible 

PREMIER 



24 H. P. 



LIGHT, 

SPEEDY 

DURABLE 



106 inch wheel base, 4-cylin- 
der, air cooled, 

3 speeds and reverse, se- 
lective type, sliding gears, 
$2,150.00. 

Demonstration by appointment with 

£. P. Slosson, 

Agent. Northern California 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The Proper Rent Service 



Our cars cannot be distinguished 
from private vehicles as only the 
latest side entrance high grade 
PopeToledo touring cars are used. 

GOLDEN STATE AUTO CO. 

Walter S. Hale, General Manager 

Relocated at 547-57 Pulton Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Park 325. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



• Illy 21, 190'j 



Rosenthal's, Inc., formerly of 107-1 13 Kearny St., and the 

RJghtWay Shoe CO., successors to Nolan Bros. Shoe Co., 812, 
8l4 Market Street, now housed together in the two most beautiful stores in San 
Francisco at 1518-30 Fillmore Street near O'Farrell and the N.E. corner 
of Van Ness Ave. and Geary Street. Sole agents for the famous 
Hanan & Son fine shoes, full assortment of which is 
to be found at' both establishments, and nu- 
merous other famous makes of shoes 
not to be found elsewhere 

SAME Old quality We are now Prepared to supply the 

SAME old courtesy public with a complete assortment of the 

SAME prompt Service best footwear in the world, and solicit 

SAME Old reasonable price your future patronage 

ROSENTHAL'S INC. 



THE STORY OF .1 SUCCESSFUL MAX. 

The financial foundation of the Schroth family was laid 
when Charles F. Schroth landed in California as a private 
in Colonel Jonathan 1). Stevenson's New York regiment 
in command of Captain John B. Frisbie. Captain Frisbie 
is now living in the City of Mexico. 

Mr. Schroth, with the characteristic energy of the early 
pioneer, shortly after his arrival, engaged in the bakery 
ami restaurant business under the linn style of Schroth 
and Carl, and later on started the well-known firm of 
Schroth and Westerfeld, a business that grew under his 
care to immense proportions. 

Lately the children of this sturdy pioneer incor- 
porated the "Schroth Estate Company"" ami this corpora- 
tion has accepted plans for the erection of an is-. mux 
building of the class "A" definition, to be erected on the 
northeast corner of Stockton street and Union Square 
avenue. John Schroth is the son of Charles I". Schroth 

and is the presideni of the Schroth Estate C pany and 

on its directorate are Judge -1. C. B. Hebbard and Byron 
I). Mauzy, each of whom married a "Miss .Schroth. 



THAT ALL MA )" A' .voir. 
The Hotel St. Francis is now ready to accommodate 
guests. It is America's Modern European plan hotel and 
the annex, with its 200 rooms, on Union Square, is open 
in the public. The famous Grill room, under the same 
chef, is in operation ami the location makes it the rery 
best plaee in new San Francisco to meet your friends ami 
acquaintances. Here you may invite business associates 
for luncheon and be within easy reach of all parts of the 
city. The management is the same thai has in the past 
made this a famous hostelry and it is deserving of the 
greatest praise for the energy it has displayed in again 
placing the hotel in shape to accommodate its guests. 
'Ibis will make good reading for your eastern friends. 



"Dinan is to Move in a Short Time" is a heading 

in one of the daily papers. "We are delighted to hear it. 
There is plenty for Dinan to move against. Xow that the 
saloons are open, ami there is no further need for the 
police to sneak into "blind pigs." we expect to hear of 
more activity on the part of mbers of the force. 




Canadian Bank of Commerre, occupying the ground floor of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
building on Sansome and California. Although gutted by Are. the construction of this build- 
ing was so perfect that it will soon be in perfect condition. It Is now occupied by the Mutual 
Life and Canadian Bank of Commerce. 






SAN 






■i Itnnk was established in Uw 

- 

ni.l.,1 

half <>f which - 
forma and one-hall S Hand. 

iliiml. 
• luiiifiil citj on the borders of I. 
■ 

ilifornia, in March, 1807, 

reel, w iili )»'» 
bilities equal to those of the II which haf 

nd profitable bus lining. 

For the ti' - B nk paid 

ireholden regular annual dividends ol 5 per cent. 
iiml ii per cent thereafter besides accumulating a surplus 
of omt :'.'> per cent of its capital. At the regular annual 
meeting of stockholders held in March of this year a reso- 
lution »as adopted authorizing the California Directors 
in purchase a Bite and erecl a Bank Building for tb 
Francis 

The building on Montgomery street, in which the 
Swiss American Bank had its office, was reduced to ashes 
by I o'clock p. u. nt' April lsih. \- - as the destruc- 
tion seemed inevitable, all the books, papers and docu- 
ments, including all papers and valuables left by clients 
For Bafe keeping, were removed to a safe place. The 
bank sustained no loss by the great lire except the tem- 
porary interruption and the cosl of refitting its offices. 
The bank has a paid-up capital of $600,000, a surplus 
,,f $205,000.00 ami deposits of $4,396,718.00. Its total 
resources of over five million dollars arc invested in 
high grade bonds, firs! mortgages on choice California 
fauns in the Coast counties. There is also always a 
large cash reserve mi hand ami with correspondents. 

Tin' Bank opened for regular business after the fire 
at thr Fillmore Office at number 1452 mi May '.'3 with 
more than sufficient coin on hand to meet all possible 
requirements without calling in a single loan from its 
clients. 

The Bank maintains a branch at 515 Davis street 
lor the accommodation of its clients in the commission 
and importing business who have reopened their stores in 
this vicinity. 

In the directorate is to be found the names of some of 
the best citizens of San Francisco. Mr. Charles Maggini 
is president and Christian Gehret is vice-president. O. A. 
Hale, Isidor Selig, Peter M. Gopcevic, B. G. Tognazzi 
(manager), A. A. Michetti (cashier) are the names that, 
appear among others as directors and officers. 



Back at the Old Stand 

Stye § HlmuHtott? 

22 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

TWOMEY & MIHOLOVICH 




The re-opening of Techau Tavern has been one of 

the events in the history of new San Francisco. It is 
now that the ladies have acquired the "Techau habit" and 
this means the "Tea Boom" at this popular Cafe. A 
particularly agreeable feature is the splendid music fur- 
nished every afternoon, during the shopping hours, 3 and 
5 p. ii. The location Sutter street, above Van Ness, 
makes it a most oenvenient meeting place for business men 
during the meal hours, noon and night. 



Tins .-la brick building on Washington St. resisted tin- great fire, una 
is now the only maoaronf and vermicelli factory in San Francisco. 



A PURE FOOD NECESSITY. 

The lire spared the oldest macaroni factory in the city 
ol' San Francisco. This was established in 1855 by A. P. 
Tenthorey and this firm was succeeded by Marlinoni and 
Podesta in the year 1885. Mr. L. R. Podesta succeeded 
his father, J. J. Podesta, of the above firm, at the time 
of the latter's death, in 1900. Mr. L. T!. Podesta's fac- 
tory to-day enjoys a large business patronage in all the 
Pacific Coast States, in Central and South America and 
in the Orient. Because of San Francisco's cosmopolitan 
citizenship and because of the purity of the product 
macaroni has become one of the great food staples of 
California. The establishment is situated at 512-514 
Washington street, in the heart of the ruins of old San 
Francisco, but it luckily escaped injury by quake and 
fire. 



THOS. B. UPTON 

Formerly of Upton Bros. 


H. E. T. WILLIAMS 
Formerly of Brown & Power Co. 


Upton 


and Williams 


STATIONERY 


j Printing 


and Book binding 


112 HAYES ST. 


SAN FRANCISCO 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906 



BULLOCK & JONES CO. 

Tailoring Department now open at 801 Van 
Ness Avenue, corner Eddy Street. Our Men's 
Furnishing and Shirt Departments will be 
opened at above address with entire new 
stock of goods early in August. 



WHERE BLOOMS THE ROSE. 
The popular florists and decorators, Podesta and 
Baldocci, formerly located at 240-242 Suin-i- street, are 
now to be found at 1200 Sutler street, between Polk and 
Van Ness and their telephone number is Emergency 312. 
Cut flowers and floral pieces, choicest blooms and the 
finest of decorating are their specialties. Remember the 
place. 



As ;m evidence of utter lack of development and 

true appreciation of church ethics, the determination of the 
Buddhists of Tokio to restore the Christian church de- 
stroyed by the mob last September, stands supreme. Im- 
agine the reception in store for one who would venture 
among the I'at-salaried religious intermediaries (especially 
bishops) to collect money for the restoration of a Buddhist 
temple. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 



Occidental and Oriental Streamship 
Company 

The Semi-Tropical Route Between San 
Francisco and Japan, China and Manila 
Via Honolulu. SAILING EVERY TEN 
DAYS. 




FLEET 
S. S. "MONGOLIA." 

27.000 tons, twin screws 

S. S. "MANCEUB1 L. 

27,0 J t<»ns. twin screws 
8. 8. -KOREA/' 

18,000 tons, twin screws 

S. S. "SIBERIA." 

18,000 tons, twin screws 

8. S. "CHINA." 

10,200 tons 

S. 8. "DORiq." 

9,500 tons 



'I'!"' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 'MM' size, KTrat speed and exceptionally luxurious appointments 
of the new steamers of ihe Pacific Mail Steamship Company mark an 
era in Trans-Pacific travel, and make it the choice of all experienced 
travelers to the Orient. All steamers go via Hawaiian Islands, the 
"Garden of the Pacific," thereby avoiding the cold, bleak weather of 
the north. Special attention Es directed to the fact that the trans- 
pacific record Is held by the S. S. "Siberia." time from Yokohama to 
San Francisco being 10 days 10 hours. A special run is made to Manila 
in the Philippine islands once every month, ensuring a fast and com- 
fortal ie service. 

Through tickets sold to all points In the Orient, connection being made 
at Japanese and Chinese ports of call. Reduced rates for round trip. 
Literal baggage allowances. Stop-oveis at all ports of call. A specialty 
Is made of Round-the-World rates and tours. 

SAN FRANCISCO AND PORTLAND STEAMSHIP CO. 

Columbia River Scenic Route 

A delightful ocean voyage affording a grand panoramic view of the 
Lower Columbia. Steamers of this line leave San Francis. -o iSj..-;ii 

street dock), every Ave days for Portland, calling at Astoria en route. 
[iOW rates Including berth and meals. Hound trip tickets at reduced 
rates. For further particulars apply to 

JAMES H. QEWS.O.N, Agent, 248 Washington street, Portland, Oregon. 
A. G. D. KERRELL, Gen. Pass. A^t., First and Bran nan Sts, San 

Francisco, California. Portland, Oregon. C. W. STRINGER. Agent. 

Cor. Third and Washington streets. 






KUAXi 



II 



Ginsjift Wwss ©If ftlfo® PastLp 



Fiftj - from a firv 

tlmn tlint of :\ ..:' 

r, 

ight importance 
Dental 
lief mill new nippliea to the - 
:i ii-i infancy, 
from her ashes then u she i> 
ariaing now. The same indomitable pluck that hat 
characterized the cirj was manifested then to an extra- 
ordinary degree. Ondaonted by the misfortune, the sim.lv 

1 > ■"• 1 put their hands tn tin- ta>k. .-mil the city 

*as rebnih with marvelous rapidity. 
Then hai Iher great conflagrations, too. Unit' 

n times tile bus - - tion of tin- city has 
burned, ami each time it was rebuilt in a jiffy. 

In fact, tlir history of the growth of San Francisco 
front the early 'lays has been one of tiro, although of re- 
lent years, until now. great tires have been rare. 

Hardly had the forty-niners pitched their tents and 
erected their wooden shacks when tire assailed them. On 
Christmas eve, 1849, a lire broke out in Dennison's Ex- 
change, in the then heart of the town, and spread rapidly 
until the entire business section was destroyed. The 

population was then about ■"'. I, and most of these were 

homeless when the flames died out. But homes were sim- 
ple affairs then, and new ones were soon constructed. The 
as estimated at over $1,000,000. It took but four 
months to rebuild the whole burned area. 

The second big blaze started on May 4, 1850, in the 
Dinted Slates Exchange, and in seven hours it had con- 
sumed the district bounded by Dupont, Montgomery, 
Jackson and (lay streets, then the heart of the town. 

Six weeks later, when rebuilding was well under way, 
another fire started in a bakery in the rear of the Mer- 
chants' Hotel, between Clay and Sacramento streets. Be- 
fore the day had passed, the whole district from Kearny 
street to the waterfront, bounded by Clay on the north 
and California on the South, was consumed. The loss was 
$.5,000,000. The region was soon rebuilt. 

On September 17, 1850 — the year of disastrous fires — 
another fire started on Jackson street, and resulted in a 
loss of $300,000. 

It was in 1851. however, that the great fire occurred — 
a fire which, when the relative sizes of the city then and 
now are considered, was more disastrous than the one 
that devastated the business section last Aoril. It is be- 
lieved to have been due to incendiarism. It was on May 
4, 1851, the anniversary of a preceding big fire, that a 
naint shop on the south side of the plaza burst into 
flames. 

The flames spread with terrible rapidity. In spite of 
every effort of the valiant volunteer firemen and others 
to arrest their prowess, they ate up house after house. 
Frame houses, brick houses, all vanished. Gunpowder 
was resorted to, as was dynamite last April, to blow up 
buildings, with a view of limiting the fire, but it was in 
vain. A high wind added to the fury of the conflagra- 
tion, until, when it finally died out, the area bounded 
by Pine street on the south and Vallejo street on the 
north, by Dupont on the west and Battery on the east, 
nractically all the thickly settled "art of the citv, was a 
mass of smouldering ruins. 

Comparing the San Francisco of 1851 with that of 
1906, it was as though the present burned area of the lat- 
ter were extended to the Potrero, to the entire Mission dis- 
'triet, and the Western Addition as far as Golden Gate 
Park and the Presidio. 

The loss in this great fire was conservatively estimated 



or about nth of tie 

f l«.«t Apt 
April l?tl 

.; of the property in 1861, tl 

' the llltti tlv ill I'M •■«« of ill.: 

■ .1 ill tie 

had 1 !. with ■ md an energy which 

•.nig manifested to-day. 
: that the tire wa» the work »f incendiaries, 

the p. [hi the pel |1 \ 

and hanged in Portsmouth Square mi June 12th, where- 

niion some of his fellow desperadoes vowed vengeance. 

'I hey were closely watehed. but ill spite of the vigilance 

of the people, another conflagration, undoubtedly a 
incendiary origin, started on June '."». 1851. That >t 
1 1 t.il intentionally was evident from the fact that 
flames appeared simultaneously at several widely separated 
points, Borne witnesses even claiming that they had seen 
men actually applying the torch. 

'Ibis tire, following SO doselj upon the other. in\ 
a loss "i $4,000,000, which would have been greater had 
not most of the citv been already in ruins from its prede- 
cessor. As it was, the burned district included most of 
the newly erected buildings, and was hounded by Broad- 
way, ('lav. Powell and Sansome streets. Efforts were made 

to apprehend the incendiaries, hut no one was found 
against whom conclusive evidence could be produced. 

I In iv wen 1 other great fires in 1855 and in 1S(>8, but 
they did not do anything like the damage of those of 1851 
and 1906. 

From each ami every one of the fires of the past, San 
Francisco has emerged a greater, more beautiful, nice 
prosperous city than ever before. That history will re- 
peat itself now is not doubted by the thoughtful, who re- 
niciiilicr that never was the city wealthier, more ambitious, 
more energetic and more resourceful than now, and never, 
in the fires of the past, w-ere the means and materials for 
rebuilding so readily available, through improved sys- 
tems of transportation, than they are to-day. 

The following words of a prominent San Franciscan, 
spoken as he viewed the ruined city in 1851, are as 
pertinent and true now as they were fifty-five years ago: 

" So great is our confidence," said he, " in the advan- 
tages and natural location of this place, and in the re- 
cuperating energies of our fellow citizens, that we do not 
for a moment hesitate to say that San Francisco will rise 
again and occupy the position which nature evidently in- 
tended her to fill and adorn. Of this fact neither our 
own citizens nor our friends abroad need doubt. There <& 
hope enough, energy enough, determination enough amon^ 
its to do it. It will take time and energy, bold hearts 
and willing hands, hopefulness and patience to do it, but 
it will be done." 



-The. 



D.Samuels Lace House Co. 

Established Over 50 Years 

Re-established in its new location 

AT THE 

S. E. Comer Van Ness Ave. and Sutter St. 
DRY GOODS 



42 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906 




FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 

Frederick Marriott, founder of the San Francisco 
News Letter and father of its present proprietor, was a 
native of Somersetshire, England, where he was born 
on July 16, 1805. After receiving an excellent educa- 
tion in England, he went to India for a time, and might 
have received a commission in the British army had 
he not waived the appointment in favor of a brother. 
Returning to England, Mr. Marriott took up literary work 
with enthusiasm and success, and was one of the founders 
of the Illustrated London News, which has continued 



to this day to be one of the leading British periodicals. 

In 1850 Mr. Marriott came to California. His first 
venture was in the banking business, but his literary tastes 
and abilities led him soon to abandon this calling, and to 
resume his writings. In the early fifties he established a 
paper called the California Mail-bag, which was the im- 
mediate predecessor of the News Letter, which he founded 
us a result ill' the success of the less elaborate Mail-bag. 

The first number of the News Letter made its appear- 
ance on July 20, 1856, just half a century ago. The 
paper bus been issued regularly every week since that date, 
never missing n number — even after the great lire of this 
year. 

From the outset, the News Letter was marked by the 
vigor of its editorials, the excellence of its abstract liter- 
ary contributions, and the foresight and discernment of 
us policies "ii matters of importance to the leading in- 
terests of California, of which it lias ever been an ardent 
champion. 

Mr. Marriott made an invariable practice of encouraging 
young and ambitious writers, gladly opening his columns 
to any production, from whatever Bource, which had 
merit, regardless of the previous literary reputation of 
the author. Such distinguished writers as Bret Harte, 
Mark Twain. Frank Pixley. Ambrose Bierce, Daniel 
O'Connell, and many others who have since won fame and 
fortune, found in the columns of the News Letter the 
vehicle of their early efforts with the pen. 

Mr. Marriott died in San Francisco on December 16, 
Ins l. when in his eightieth year. During the later years 
of his active life, his writings were as virile as ever, and 
his interest in the welfare of the land of his adoption re- 
mained keen until the last. After his death, the pro- 
prietorship of the News Letter passed to his son, Frederick 
Marriott, Jr., under whose management the paper is 
now conducted. 



TEE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The registration of the Summer School has now reached 
725, as compared with the total enrollment of 705 of last 
year. This showing is very satisfactory to the University 
authorities and considered exceptionally good considering 
the unsettled condition of affairs after the fire. 



STATEMENT 

FIREMEN'S FUND 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 

OAKLAND, June 28,1906. 

This new corporation was organized on May 16, 1906, with a capital stock of $1,000,000, divided into 10,000 shares Of 
$100 each, and in addition thereto a net surplus of $1,000,000, payable in quarterly installments of $500,000 each. Nearly 
$400,000 has already been paid in in cash. Succeeding quarterly payments fall due September 20 and December 20, 1906 ( 
and March 20, 1907. 

The corporation was licensed to do an insurance business by the California Insurance Commissioner on May 19, 1906. 

IT HAS NO LIABILITIES IN THE DESTROYED DISTRICT OF SAN FRANCISCO, AND IS NOT AF- 
FECTED BY THAT CALAMITY. 

This new Corporation, even at this time, is financially stronger than most insurance companies operating on the Paci- 
fic Coast. 

It has assumed the outstanding, unburned liability of the old Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, for which service 
it has received adequate payment. This compensation, together with the cash paid in by the stockholders of the new Cor- 
poration brings its present cash assets up to nearly $3,000,000, all of which is available for meeting its liabilities under poli 
cies, contracts or guarantees. 

The guarantee of the new Corporation will be endorsed on all policies of the old Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 
not involved in any loss, if the policy-holders will present their policies to the agents of the old Fireman's Fund. 

W.J. DUTTON, President. 



21. 1906 



SAN 






tFORNIA JON. 

n of l)i. 

built - tlip California Cam 

place "ii Sum Dck in 

the afternoon. 

eral huii.lt., I people being 1. The ceremonies 

nt of the 
inn Cam Isador Jacobs, a 

hrirf I with which building 

d lifter the fire •>( April |sih. He 
ited thai out of the bu i ann in tlie 

of nearly forty nor cent of the 
canned frail ..input of California, thai the California 
Cannei he only ones t" rebuild in t it 

■son. Mr. Jacobs attributed some ol the 
miniition and s mpletion in lime was due 

to the determined attitude of the Mayor of San Francisco, 
the Honorable E. E. Schmitz, and he then called upon 
him for some remarks. The Mayor complimented the 
Company very highly upon their enterprise, and 
that they would go down in the future history of the New 
San Francisco for the activity and energy which they had 
shown. He uls" spoke glowingly of the future of the 
New San Francisco which would be more beautiful mi. I 
better in every way than the old. After completing his 
address Mrs. Schmitz, the Mayor's wife, was presented 
with a bouquet "!' flowers from the working girls in the 
factory, one of whom acted as spokeswoman. 

Mr. Jacobs then called upon the Hon. W. F. Stafford, 
State Lahor Commissioner of California, who began his 
address with some humorous remarks, in which ho stated 
that it was the first time in his career that he had been 
called upon to visit a manufacturing establishment. He 
said as a rule his visits had been unsolicited. He then 
stated that during the afternoon he had made a complete 
inspection of the Cannery and Plant and he took pleasure 
in complimenting the Company upon the splendid sani- 
tary conditions which had been incorporated in the con- 
struction. He stated that never before in his experience 
had he found such perfect conditions existing for the 
purpose of carrying out cleanliness in the packing. 
After some further remarks on his part Lieut. Scott, 
U. S. A. was called upon as representing the National 
Government. He also complimented the Company very 
highly and gave a brief sketch of the work done by the 
Army in assisting Mayor Schmitz in rehabilitating the 
City. At the completion of his address Prof. E. J. 
Wickson of the Horticultural Department of the Uni- 
versity of California was called upon. He stated that 
while all the speakers had been complimenting the Com- 
pany upon the resumption of business in San Francisco 
and the great good that would result to the large number 
of laboring people that would be employed, and while he 
desired to compliment the Company on this score, yet the 
significance was far greater, as it was something that the 
entire State of California was interested in, and that he, 
representing the State University, wished to congratulate 
the Company on behalf of the State for what they had 
done in showing to the world their steadfastness of pur- 
pose and determination of effort. He then paid a com- 
pliment to Mr. Jacobs, the President of the Company by 
saying that he had participated in various Fruit Growers' 
conventions in which Mr. Jacobs had been a prominent 
feature, and in this regard his influence had been carried 
far greater than that of starting fruit canneries in the line 
of discovering methods to push the products of California 
in the markets of the world. 

Mr. F. W. McDonald, Industrial Commissioner of the 
Santa Fe Railway System delivered a short address in 
which he stated that on April 19th, the day after the fire 
started in San Francisco he met the President of the Cali- 
fornia Canneries Co., who referred to a lease that had 
been closed but not yet signed for a block of their land. 



thai be n.lin I ii 

Mr. Jacobs t" bothor him nt soch ■ time, as their ruli- 
ng in relief supplir., 
hundred thousand homeless people, Mr, 
- told him thai il was a matter "f immediate i 
sity both t" the Company and t" the hundred 

ling upon w.irk. and the 'pinkest way t" relieve the 

sitiiiiti.m wi manufacturing enterprises started; 

thai he had already secured the lumber and wanted to 

i place i" put it. He was advised to go ahead im- 

i liately, and did so. 

Rev. J. Net., then delivered a most eloquent address 
complimenting the Company, the Mayor, the U. S. Army 

officials and the large number of laboring | pie thai were 

it Mr. -i i . oncluded the ceremonies by 

praising the work of the Mayor and other officials, and 
thanking them as well as his colleagues in the Company 

for the work thai bail I n clone in rehabilitating their 

Cannery in San Francisco in the face of what, to ordinary 
individuals, might have been considered insurmountable 
obstacles, and the invite, I guests then dispersed with three 
cheers for the California Canneries Company, and the 
May,>r of San Francisco. Refreshments were then en- 
joyed by those present and the Cannery employees pro- 
ceeded with their work on the huge amount of fruit on 
hand. 

Just before the fire of April ISth. the California Can- 
neries Co. had closed with the Santa Fe System a twenty 
war lease on a block of land situated between 18th and 
19th and Minnesota and Indiana Streets. This property 
was on the tracks of all the railroads and close to the 
City water front. The site was selected as the best labor 
district in the city. It was the intention of the Canneries 
Company to build and occupy the premises by April 1907. 

The fire of April 18th, 19th and 20th 'destroyed six 
canneries including several of the largest cannery plants 
in California, amongst which was the plant of the Cali- 
fornia Canneries Co. in this City. Within five days after 
the disaster Isador Jacobs, President of the California 
Canneries Co. closed a deal whereby they acquired the 
Dixon Canning Co.'s plant at Dixon, Cal. for this season. 
They also commenced the construction of one of the 
largest canning plants in California and will give work 
to 1000 women, girls and men this season. 

The canning capacity destroyed in the recent disaster 
comprised about 25 per cent, of the total canning capacity 
of California and the California Canneries Co. have the 
distinction of being the only cannery rebuilt this season. 

The main factory is 120x180 and the warehouse is 
80x200, capable of storing upwards of 150,000 cases of 
goods. This will give the Company ample storage facil- 
ities, besides letting out considerable storage space for 
canned goods. The factory will have a capacity of over 
75,000 cans per day, and a total for the season of 250,000 
cases, or 6,000,000 cans. 

At the time the erection of the cannery was begun it 
was announced that it would be ready early in July. The 
Company is to be congratulated at the enterprise dis- 
played in getting started so quickly, also upon the fact 
that they were the only Cannery that had the energy and 
ability to rebuild in time for this season's pack. 

The general offices of the Company have never left San 
Francisco but were opened in that City while the fire was 
still burning. 



AT DEL MONTE. 

Among the arrivals at Del Monte this week are R. M. 
Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Olds, Mr. Chas. T. Crocker 
and others of San Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. Win. E. G. 
Saunders of Fresno, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Washburn of 
Los Angeles, Miss Ide of Manila, Mr. and Mrs. GeoTge 
Polhemus of San Jose and Mrs. Charles P. Kling of New 
York. 



u 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906 



Iinanste* ®f ¥©m 



The Absorbing Theme. 

The absorbing theme during the latter part of last and 
the first days of this week all over Europe was the Dreyfus 
case, which was then before the highest court of France 
on review. Long ago the question of the man's guilt or 
innocence was subordinated to questions of international 
import which might set at least France and Germany 
ablaze. But to France herself the review of the case 
meant revelations, or possible exposures, which might 
threaten the very life of die Nation's military establish- 
ment. But happily the prompt action of the Chamber 
of Deputies and the Senate, when the feared exposure 
came and shook France to her centre, averted scenes that 
might have grown into almost mob law. And what was 
equally satisfying, the decision of the Court completely 
exonerated Germany from being even remotely a party 
to the crime. It will be remembered that Dreyfus was 
charged with having sold military secrets of France to 
Germany concerning new plans for mobilizing a French 
army on the German frontier; certain improvements in 
field artillery, also plans and routes for the rapid con- 
struction of strategical military railroads. The charges 
against Dreyfus included a strong intimation that the 
Kaiser personally conducted the scheme to corrupt Drey- 
fus, who was one of the most capable of the French ar- 
tillery officers, as well a strategist of great cunning. As 
will be remembered, the accusation was based upon cer- 
tain correspondence in Dreyfus' handwriting, together 
with maps and other details of army secrets which were 
"accidentally" discovered in the war office and which were 
quickly identified as the work of Dreyfus, he being on the 
General Staff and familiar with its plans and work. This 
correspondence itself proved that the culprit was in 
league with the Berlin war office. All this was in 1894. 
Dreyfus was convicted and given a life sentence in a 
wire cage on Devil's Island in French Guinea. But so 
convinced were his friends, including M. Zola and 
Colonel Picquart of the army especially that he was a 
victim of a great conspiracy they persevered in demand- 
ing a new hearing. For li is pains Colonel Picquart was 
expelled from the army in disgrace, and Zola was sub- 
jected to a heavy fine and imprisonment, though the 
sentence was never inflicted. Meanwhile public senti- 
ment began to be inquisitive because of the conduct of 
General Mereier, then chief of staff and now a Senator, 
and others of the conspirators. To use a coarse and 
slang expression, they began to boast how they "did up 
tin' .lew," and not until twelve long years, because the ring 
was so powerful, was the government obliged to order the 
highest court in the Republic — a court that is composed 
of forty-nine of supposedly the ablest jurists of Prance, to 
review the case. Forty-nine judges in fiery red rol.es 
must be an impressive spectacle. Anyway, this courl 
not only completely disculpated Dreyfus, but declared thai 
every single document thai was submitted to the court 
martial twelve years before was rank forgery: that it was 
the most diabolical conspiracy in modern times, and in- 
timating that General Mereier and the army general 
staff were the guilty ones. Also the court so framed its 
finding that it made it obligatory on President Falleires 
to nominate Captain Dreyfus for reinstatement in the 
army with the rank of Major and reinstatement of 
Colonel Picquart with the rank of Brigadier General, 
both to date from 1900, which nominations were hur- 
riedly sent to tlie Deputies and Senate where they were 
promptly confirmed by an almost unanimous vote. What 
will be done with General Mereier and such of his co- 
conspirators as are living remains to be seem, but mem- 
bers of the Chamber of Deputies as well as of the Senate 



have already made demands upon the government that it 
cite them before a court martial. Thus is the greatest 
conspiracy of modern times exposed, but better still, the 
French army will again have the confidence of the people, 
while the Kaiser will be better liked in France, now that 
France of and by herself completely exonerated both 
himself and his nation from grave and humiliating 
charges. It is believed that the moral strength and effi- 
ciency of the army will now resume normal conditions. 
* * * 

Trouble In the Latin Slates. 

The field of international trouble has shifted in part 
to the Latin Republics of Central America. As yet actual 
war is confined to Honduras and Salvador as allies 
against Guatemala, but it does not seem possible at this 
nine that Nicaragua and Costa Rica can help being in- 
volved, if not Panama as well. There is no principal at 
stake, but that docs not lessen the danger of possible com- 
plications which might strain the Monroe Doctrine so 
much that, the United States would have to step in and 
force the warring Republics to meet and agree upon a 
Uisis of peace. Already the property and commerce of 
English, French and German subjects have suffered 
greatly, and they will suffer still more if a stop is not put 
to the war in short order. Under the latest interpreta- 
tion of the Monroe Doctrine by the Washington Govern- 
ment, foreign creditors of the Latin States may under- 
take tlie collection of their dues, lint may not sieze upon 
or permanently establish a foothold to enforce their de- 
mands. This makes it incumbent on the United States 
to use its influence, and may have to threaten, in the in- 
terests of the creditors. But Great Britain, France and 
Germany more particularly are getting very tired of the 
slow and uncertain process of enforcing payment; be- 
sides, the time will never conn' when they will quite kill 



The German Savings & 
Loan Society 



526 CALIFORNIA ST. 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus S 2, 552, 7 19.61 
Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1 ,000,000.00 
Deposits June 30, 1906 $38,476,520.22 



F. Tillmann, Jr., President; Daniel Meyer, First Vice President; 
Emit Rohte, Second Vice President; A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; 
William Herrmann, asst. Cashier; George Tourny, Secretary; A.H. 
Muller, asst. Secretary; W. S. Goodfellow, General Attorney. 

Directors— F. Tillmann, Jr; Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhart, I. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. 
Kruse, W. S. Goodfellow. 












out th ri«l pomroiont in Central and 

and it • '. the 

demand to 
now vai their debts 

let the Dot, there- 

3 
involving the 

- 

of the powen o( Eu 

• • • 

The situation in Rue the Empin than 

ever, l>ut there is far less danger of involving the other 
nations, Like a man wh itorm brewing in the 

distance and strengthens his house - onslaught. 

so the several powers have prepared themselves to ward 
off the efl I issia's impending revolution. Tin 

Emperor is now willing to form a new Cabinet, but he 
can find no conservative men of ability to accept the port- 
The reactionists would assume the direction of 
the bureaus, but that would mean a return to the old 
policy of repression by military force and the death 
penalty for every opponent of it. The douma would 
gladly supply the throne with material for a new cabinet, 
but tluit would mean the dethronement of the Czar and a 
wild fruitless attempt i" -'• the government on 

lines of socialistic principles. Thus the Empire is con- 
front, id by mm and theories that stand for the extreme 
in all things. Meanwhile the Czar and the church cannot 
disabuse their minds of the hallucination that the former 
rules by the grace and command of God, and that the 
latter is divinely appointed to interpret the will and pur- 
pose of the Almighty toward the masses, of whom there 
are 130,000,000, perhaps fully 80 per cent, of them being 
illiterate, and whose minds have been inflamed to a 
state of frenzy by socialist and anarchist speakers. Such 
is the political, social and religious condition of Russia 
at this hour. A Parliament in session whose avowed pur- 
pose is to widen every breach, and with disaffection 
spreading in the army and navy. Only a miracle could 
save Russia from the bloodiest revolution in centuries. 
And it all comes from tyranny and greed on the one side 
and enforced ignorance and poverty on the other side. 



E. A. Hugill, superintendent of the State Univer- 
sity buildings at Berkeley, reversed the implication of his 
name during a recent vacation spent in Los Angeles and 
other sections of the South. He returned a few days ago 
with Mrs. Hugill, who was formerly Miss Grace Creider, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Creider, of Riverside. 
They were married July 7th by the Reverend J. V. Coombs 
of San Jose. 



18 III. BORA 

VV« I of purification !• we have 

Hidden rhangrs in men and things 
thai 1 in the extreme. Man 

1 i ompanionahip 
cold-bloodedly, and with malice aforethought Evil 
I companionship, and yel (he 

gradual and in rowtn. 

Reform nle, of sudden birth. There is a 

revulsion and man is given an illuminating insight that re- 

'I he teachings at the mother's ki the memory 

picture of the honest old father, the associations of boy- 
hood, before world-contamination dispelled illusions, the 
golden illusions of youth, all these conspire to bring aboul 
lightning reforms. On the brain there is suddenly pro- 
jected, in calcium clearness, paralleled pictures that startle 
into living consciousness all the latent virtues. 

Mayor Schmitz is horn again, and because of his re- 
birth must be paid a tribute for his actions since the tire. 

Did he gaze in that furnace glow and see a frightful pic- 
ture? Did that molten mirror reflect something that 
A within him all the manliness, all the nobility in 
his character? The practical man of business can have 
but little patience with the fulminations of the el 
would-be reformer or with the political informer. The 
reformer is generally impractical. The informer is nearly 

always a self-confessed sneak and rascal. 

There is a bare possibility thai Reagan has told som ■ 
truths. The Reverend Nun, pyrotechnic preacher, is talk- 
ing to the galleries. Mayor Schmitz has done the practical 
thing. He has appointed a police board that is above sus- 
picion. Admitting Reagan's charges, is it, not possible to 
imagine Schmitz ashamed of Reagan and the others? The 
News Letter has pointed out long ago that Schmitz was 
carrying a load, a heavy load. Ts it not conceivable that 
Schmitz is ashamed of Ruef? Is it not within the pos- 
sibilities that he would throw the load back into the muck 
where he found it? Let us look into Scbmitz's life. He 
is of gentle birth. His people were refined people. His 
profession, the musical profession, threw him into early 
association with refined people, for his attainments in the 
musical line are not small and mean. How or when ho 
came in touch with his incubus is known. That this 
tumor was of gradual growth cannot be doubted. 

Let us, therefore, trust Schmitz; let us make the right 
road easy. Let us hope that he has re-made himself; 
that he has come to know he is indebted to Ruef only for 
a mass of knowledge that is really of dubious value. Let 
us be thankful for the new police commission. Let ns 
believe in the future; let us face it, and if Reagan rakes 
up the muck, let us remember that the lily is beautiful, 
and that it blossoms best in dismal and miasmic swamps. 
Mayor Schmitz has done the right thing at the right time, 
ever since the great fire. Is he born again ? 



'■Mi! 





Siilii iiiillH 








Van New Avenue at Pino Street. 



46 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906. 




Judge David 5. Terry 




James King of William. 





Air. i. -win B. Paul 



M@iifc@@ir§o 



We cannot read the names of such men as Almarin B. Paul, Charles Doane, James King of Wm,, Judge 
David S. Terry and others without a glow of pride. These were the men of old who achieved wonders in the 
face of almost insurmountable difficulties. Certain it is that these men, and their strenuous associates of 
Vigilante Days, had their faults and vices and that each possessed an army of enemies. Men who do things, 
the builders of empire, make enemies easily and keep them. After the lapse of many years their virtues 
shine pre-eminent and we forget all else. In other words, they were the creator of results. And so it will be with 
the earthquake pioneer of 1906. He will lie remembered because of results achieved. Only the builder will be 
apotheosized. Ihe iron hearted men who pluck courage from the ash-pile and twisted steel, brick heap and 
tumbled granite and who defy destruction's waste have their faults. The close range myopic view of their each 
day life brings out their every defect in mountain relief, but History's broad view will wipe out the kinks as with a 
sponge and the achievements of the strenuous will stand as gleaming white guide posts of the days of 1906. 






h:\m: ws i.ivi 






BRUNSING. TOLLE & POSTEL 

INC. 

Wholesale Liquor Dealt 



Distillers of 

OAK RUN WHISKEY 



Sole Distributors of 

THE FAMOUS TOLLE R.YE 



Temporary Office, 

210 EAST ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

PHONE WEST 1438. 



THE ONLY WAY TO COOK 

use 
85 cent* Gas 

CARLOADS OF 

$15.00 GAS RANGES 

Free Service Free Connection 

Easy Payments 
Restaurant Ranges, Griddles, Broilers 

W? GAS COMPANY 

500 HaightSt., 421 Presidio Ave. 

1260 Ninth Ave. 



f 



L ^ 



Hotel Imperial 

931 EDOY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

One block (torn Van Ness avenue 



European Plan 

Electric Cars Direct From Ferries 

Telephones, Electric Lights, Elevator 

Baths, Steam Heat 

Every Courtesy and Attention 



%i 



E. S, DeWOLFE, Proprietor 



VIAL "\hl \.\[> 

tried on UN mi- 
ni mi 

Chop -UcV n|HT.l 

<uii! Iiinl nesl drama 11 

■ the Inner kingdom, he of 
r, will 

i'il up ni regular interval). 
Ii may !»• mentioned, parentheti- 
cally, that the regular intervals 

no connection with the 

Tom Toms of am ienl \ intage 

and cymbals that are gnaranl I 

to wake the Athens "i the Paci- 
ni ii> lethal sleep are even 
now "ii Che way. Accompanying 
ill ise instruments of torture is 
Yrt Wing Ah. who i>. despite hi- 
handicap of Bex, the prototype of 
Mrs. Fiske. rel Wing AJi haj 

the distinction of being tl ni 

-ilium pure interpreter of the 
complicated female roles of the 
Chinese Ibsen, Lung Duck. 
Lung Duck's chief claim on fame 
is liis historic fight to limit the 
length nf a play to one week. 
His enemies assert that his an- 
xiety to reduce the perspective of 
the native drama was merccnai -\ 
and arose from his desire for the 
added royalties that accrue from 
the presentation of two plays in 
the same length of time that it 
took for the presentation of one. 
Meedless to say Luna Duck be- 
lieves in Art for Art's sake. Tie 
asserts that the royalties are 
merely incidental, and that if as- 
sured the managers would not 
squandeT the money in riotous 
living, he would gladly return it. 
There is a possibility that Luna; 
Duck will come to America. It 
all denends on the reception that 
waits Yet Wing Ah and the one 
week of plav in the new Oakland 
theatre. The play house is to 
be located at 9th and Franklin 
streets on the old Fleming prop- 
erty and is to cost $13,000. 



The" should make those Holy 
"Rollers into unholy swingers. 

When Drevfus was vindicated 
a grim laugh of triumph was 
heard to issue from the grave of 
Zola. 



J* 



Dreyfus has made, his enemies 
look like the bivalvian termina- 
on of the name of one of them. 



New Gampi's Restaurant 

NOW OPEN 

French and Italian Dinners 

1569 Ellis St., Near Fillmore 



FOR CONVENIENCE 



always r.»v* a sroplv of Boron's EaeV Brand Con - 
denred Milk on onnd. Suilable for all r-ousrhn'd pur- 
pos-s. For puddinp*: ralce and all kinds o ( dewrn. 
S.nd for Receipt Book, 108 Hudson street. New 
York. 



A Fair Offer 

To prove to nSeren Irom 

Dyspepsia 

the rem. irk. iMc iti< it i 

Glycozone 

I Mill send ft 

$1.00 Bottle FREE 

to .my onr tending Ihll ad, and i\ ( 

R»y loTwatdi' \ b * o l u t c I y 

armies* Indorsed and Huccctslully u»cd 
h\ phynklnnv I iffllly 

" offeratat i (era short time 

^-^s^j 

64F Prince St.. New York 



.Vritc tod?y 



SCANDINAVIAN-AMERICAN 
SAVINGS BANK ' 

Chronicle Building 

Transacts a general 
banking business. 

Interest paid on de- 
posits. 

Special attention giv- 
en to the transfening 
of money to Foreign 
Countries. 



--Mothers, He sure and use "Mrs. Winslow' a 
Soothing syrup" for your children while teething. 



Talking Points for 

THE 

FOUR-TRACK 

NEWS 

Which Expla'n Its Emphatic Success 

Here are a few reasons why you want THE FOUR- 
TRACK NEWS on the reading table in your home. 
Look them over, think them over— then send for a sample 
copy and see if you don't think THE FOUR-TRACK 
NEWS is worth $ 1 .00 a year to yourself and your family. 

Its scope is confined to no geographical section; the 
world is its field. 

It instructs. 

It entertains. 

It's different. 

It is a universal favorite. 

It is always and forever up-to-date. 

It is a great help to students in history classes. 

There is much in every issue of educational value to 
every reader. 

It is entertaining to the father and mother as well as to 
the children. 

It is eloquent with bright, brief, valuable articles and 
superb pictures. 

Subscriptions, $1.00 a Year; Foreign Countries, $1.50; 
at News-Stands, 10 Cents a Copy. 

A sample copy and our special terms to agents will cost 
you nothing. Send your address and two references to 
GEORGE H. DANIELS. Pub. 15 A. 57 E. 42d St., 
New York. 



48 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906. 



By G. H. Jessop. 

The price of stock was falling fast, 
When through the 'Frisco board-room passed 
A broker with his wallet full, 
Who cried to every anxious bull — 
" I'll sell some more." 

His hat was brown, his dress was neat, 
Trim patent leathers hid his feet, 
And like the piping of a bird, 
His little treble voice was heard — 
" I'll sell some more." 

In every eye he saw the light 
Of speculation gleaming bright; 
They took the stock so freely strewn, 
As he piped forth in minor tone — 
" I'll sell some more." 

"Oh, give us," Sandy said, " a rest ; 
These Alta sales must be a jest." 
He shook certificates on high, 
And, hoarser grown, could barely cry — 
" I'll sell some more." 

" Beware the ravages of Budd ! 
Beware the call for extra mud !" 
This was the cry, as down the grade 
The stock still slid. He, undismayed — 
" I'll sell some more." 

At break of day ,when heavenward 
The values should again have soared, 
Before the Stock Exchange began, 
A whisper o'er the sidewalk ran — 
" I'll sell some more." 

There in the twilight, cocktailless, 
He dealt out Alta to the press, 
And from amid the noisy throng 
His voice was weak, his purpose was strong — 
" I'll sell some more." 

And when at closing of the night, 
The stock was nearly out of sight, 
Budd still stood firmly as a rock. 
And shook certificates of stock — 
" I'll sell some more." 
S. F. News Letter. January 12, 1878. 



SAN FRANCISCO SHIPBUILDING. 

Even as late as twenty years ago, the building of large, 
ocean-going steamers on the Pacific Coast was not seri- 
ously icgarded by the world east of the Rocky Mountains. 
To-day there are no better built ships anywhere than 
those constructed right in San Francisco. The Union, 
Risdon and Fulton Iron Works, Boole's shipyard, Dickie's 
yard, and a few lesser ones, are capable of turning out as 
splendid vessels as any of the boasted yards of England, 
Scotland, Germany or the Eastern United States. 

San Franciscans always knew of the capabilities of 
their local shipyards. It was not until Congress awoke 
to the fact that the Western yards were well equipped 
and well manned that the shipbuilding establishments 
of San Francisco started on the road to the world-wide 
fame they now enjoy. 

The earlier cruisers for the United States navy, such 
as the Charleston and San Francisco, were the first craft 
to open distant eyes. Then followed a few less notable 
craft, but when the magnificent battleship Oregon made 
her memorable run from this city to Jupiter Inlet, Flor- 
ida, in 1808, and reported, on her arrival: "Ready for 
duty," it was demonstrated beyond all question that no 
better vessels can be built anywhere in the world than 
those of San Francisco. 

The Olympia, Dewey's flagship at Manila Bay; the 
battleship Wisconsin; several other armor-clads and 
cruisers, as well as torpedo boats and submarine boats ; 
great steamers of the American-Hawaiian Steamship 
Company; river boats, freighters, coasting vessels, ferry- 
boats of the Key Route style; sailing vessels of every de- 
scription — these are sufficient in number, variety and 
quality to testify unmistakably that San Francisco, in 
addition to bcino- one of the world's Greatest seaports, is 
one of the world's greatest shipbuilding centers. 

And this fact is now acknowledged by the world. 



AN IMPORTANT REMOVAL. 

C'hristensen, Edwards and Goodwin, representing the 
American Central Insurance Co., the St. Paul Fire and 
Marine Insurance Companv, the Mercantile Fire and 
Marine Insurance Company, and Lloyd's Plate Glass In- 
surance Company, have removed their business office to 
lfllO Sutter street, between Fillmore and Webster streets. 
The Oakland office, where all losses ar adjusted, is located 
at Telegraph avenue and 20th streets. 

Christenseu. Edwards and Goodwin have adjusted and 
paid 1150 losses on San Francisco to date. 




Polk Street, near McAllister. 



.50 

!@®k R,®vii(sw§ 

The recent discussion between 
General Funston and H. A. La- 
rler in a week]}' paper with re- 
spect to the dynamiting opera- 
tions in San Franciso has led 
to some merriment at the ex- 
pense of the latter. The con- 
test is not over yet, and Lafler 
has not yet finished. There will 
be some pretty positive fun be- 
fore he has done, for he is a 
stayer, and, generally speaking, 

an exceedingly careful writer. 

* $ g 

I wonder what the women's 
rights people will think of the 
dews of Miss Sheldon, the fam- 
ous librarian, who has declared 
that women attain no distinction 
in that profession. This is of 
all businesses the one that might 
be considered most suitable for 
women. It calls for no extraor- 
dinary physical powers, or men- 
tal grasp. It calls for the par- 
ticularly feminine virtues of 
perseverance and attention to de- 
tail. Yet Miss Sheldon says 
that the main result of the in- 
flux of women into the library 
profession has been the driving 
out of men by their acceptance 
of smaller salaries. It looks as if 
the feminine bubble must soon 

1 mrst. 

* * * 

The Funk & Waenalls Com- 
pany announce that they have 
purchased the well-known peri- 
odical, " Public Opinion,"' which 
mi and after .Inly 7th will be 
merged witli the "Literary Di- 
gest. 

" Public Opinion " was 

founded in 188G — four years 
prior to the birth of "The Lit- 
erary Digest" — and it has en- 
joyed a wide popularity. The 
various newspaper directories 
for the present year give its cir- 
culation at from 45,000 to 80,- 
000. It was originally pub- 
lished in Washington, D. C, but 
for tin' hist ei^ht or ten years it 
has been published in New York. 
The Literarv Digest, though .i 
younger publication, has made 
rapid growth in its circulation, 
which, before the consolidation, 
exceeded 125,000. 

* * * 

By a process of reasoning tlrl 
will make sympathetic appeal to 
Charlotte Perkins - Stetson - Gil- 
man, Dr. Otto Weininger of 
Vienna proves that woman — 
metaphysically speaking — does 
not exist. His book, "Six and 
Character" has just been trans- 
lated from the sixth German edi- 



SAN FRANCISCO .VEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1900 



t' 



'■*% 



[ VACATION 1906. ) 

ISSUED BY THE 

California Northwestern Railway 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 
AND 

North Shore Railroad 

THE SCENIC ROUTE 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 

Giving full information in regard to 

Camping spots, the location, accommodations, attractions, ctc.,oi mineral 
spring resorts and country homes and farms where summer boarders 
are taken, with terms of board, &7.00 and upwards per week. 

To be had at Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street, San Francisco. Inquiry by mail will 
bring an immediate response. 



^ 



JAMES AGLER, 

General Manager. 



R. X. RYAN 
Gen. Pass, and Freight, Agt. 



J 



e 



! % 



Santa Fe 

% w 



The Santa Fe 



Yosemite 
Valley 

via 
and The New Railway 



^ 



The most comfortable way. Only $28.50 for 
the round-trip. Reduced rates at camps and 
hotels. Write for Pamphlet, 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices 

Ferry Building, San Francisco 
1112 Broadway, Oakland 
130 J Street, Sacramento 
23 South First Street, San Jose 
1031 J Street, Fresno 



,J 












■ntain« the rr.v 
of • I 
youth 

of the i' 

possession of bv the male ami t > 
be formed by him. ! 

tain to help on) 
that woi 
neither good nor bad, angel no- 
devil. She i» also non- 
thical : anil conclndi i 

ntiallc 
logical and ethical woman i — 
metaphysically speaking - 
nothing. She lias n.> es 
\- if to heap ohliimit 
further on the better half of the 

attribnb 
Bame view? that he Beta down to 
Plato and Kant and Bays further 
that they are interwoven with 
the conception of Christianity. It 
may he interesting to the women 
of the clubs, who will make thi> 
hook look like a holdover tem- 
perance tract, that its author died 
unrepentant. He commit! 
eide in the house once occupied 
by Beethoven in Vienna. The 
book is published by G. P. Put- 
nam's Sons. 



I SPEAKING ACQUAINT- 
ANCE. 

The first witness called in a 
recent petty lawsuit in Cincin- 
nati was an Irishman, of whose 
competence as a witness opposing 
counsel entertained doubt. At 
their instance there was put to 
him, before being sworn, the us- 
ual interrogatory, "Do you know 
the nature of an oath?" 

A broad grin overspread the 
face of the Irishman as he re- 
plied : 

"Indade, your honor, I may 
say it is second nature with me." 
— Warper's 'Weekly. 



WILLING TO TRUST. 
"Here, hold my horse a min- 



ute, wil 



you r 



"Sir ! I am a member of con- 
gress !" 

"Never mind. You look hon- 
est. I'll take a chance." — Louis- 
ville Courier- Journal. 



GOOD SCHEME. 
"Jimmy's pot a great scheme 
to get out o' school on these nice 
days." 

"How does he work it ?" 
"He goes out an' washes his 
face at recess, an' the teacher 
thinks he's sick an' sends him 
home." — Cleveland Leader. 



Lea & Perrins' Sauce 




ORIGINAL 



WORCESTERSHIRE- 
T 



A bottle of Lea cv I'cr- 

ritis' Sauce i- one of the 
most useful items in 
every w e 1 l-eq u i p peil 
kitchen. No other sea- 
soning i in proves the 
flavor or so many differ- 
ent dishes. 

Beware of Imitations 
Look lor Lea & Perrlns' signature 

lj IS., N. -i 




California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 



Capital, Fully Paid 
Total Assets - - 



$2,000,000 
10,000,000 



A General Banking Business Conducted. 
Savings and Checking Accounts Received. 
Interest Paid on Deposits. 



MAIN OFFICE-CORNER MONTGOMERY AND CALIFORNIA STREETS 



BRANCHES: 

WEST END BRANCH— 1531 Devisadero St., near Post,. 
MISSION BRANCH— 92? Valencia St., near Twenty-first., 
UPTOWN BRANCH--1850 Geary St., West, of Fillmore. 

DAVID F. WALKER, President. 
J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 



We Recommend 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

German Expert Optician, now at 1115 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. His Optical 
Skill, knowledge and many years of practical experience are powerful factors to his great 
success. Mayerle's Eye Water 50 cts., by mail 65 cts. Mayerle's Antiseptic Wipers to be 
used when glasses blur, tire or strain the eyes, 2 for 25 cents. Eyes examined free. 



52 



GAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31. 1906, 



See Spences 



Invisible, neatest eyeglass in the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL CO. 
1315 Golden Gate Avenue at Fillmore 



GHINN-BERETTA OPTICAL COMPANY 



Have Located at 



1821 Fillmore Street 

Between Bush] and Sutter Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 



OAKLAND OFFICE 466 13TH STREET 

W. R. GRACE & CO. 

Importers ot cement 

and Structural Steel 

TEMPORARY OFFICE 

NEW TRIBUNE BUILDING 

8th Street Oakland 

J. D, Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and commission merchants 
General Agents 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

(Standard Portland Cement.) 

OCEANIC DOCK 

Also temporary office 1112 Broadway, 

Oakland. 

MURPHY GRANT & GO. 

Wholesale and Dry Goods 

6th and Franklin Streets, - - Oakland, Cal. 

New goods constantly arriving and on sale 
at our temporary quarters, Eight and Franklin 
Streets, Oakland, Cal. 

The erection of a new steel structure will im- 
mediately be commenced on our old site, Bush 
and Sansome Sis., San Francisco. 

Smiths Gash Store 

Mutual and co-operative. Now No. 16 Steu- 
art Street, San Francisco, just around the cor- 
ner from the old location. First store on city- 
front to resume Mail Orders exclusively. 



cnril AM CAUSERIE. 

Since writing my letter last 
week nothing of moment in the 
theatrical line lias startled New 
York. There is considerable 
talk about a new play called 
"the Chaste Diana" which 
while not written on the Thaw- 
White murder seems to lit the 
case exactly. Charles Dickson, 
the actor wrote the play and it is 
rumored that Margaret Auglin is 
contemplating the play for next 
season. The principal masculine 
character is a wealthy young 
decadent whose "past" operate! 
to lose for him the regard of the 
woman he loves. I am told that 
Otis Turner has been engaged 
for the "College Widow" for next 
season. 

"The Man From Now" has 
captivated Boston where it is 
showing at the Tremont Theatre. 
This merry melange of music 
and frivolity has captured Xev, 

England. 

Frank C. Payne, business 
manager of the "English Grand 
Opera" Company, who has been 
abroad in the interests of Henry 
W. Savage, sails from Londo i 
the early part of next week. Mr. 
Payne is extremely enthusiastic 
in his praises concerning Elsa 
Svnamosy. the new prima donna. 
engaged for Puccinni's "Madam 
Butterfly." This artist by the 
way, comes credited to America 
with the endorsement of the com- 
poser, and if accounts are to be 
credited, will create veritable 
sensation in the role. Mr. 
Payne also speaks highly of the 
beauties of the score of "Madam 
Butterfly," and declares a gen- 
uine treat is in store for music 
lovers. The reception accorded 
the opera in London at Covent 
Garden, has been most note- 
worthy. 

Lena Abarbanell, the charm- 
ing cantatrice, who has created 

a sensation in Reginald <le 
Kovcn's "Student King." has 
cancelled her engagement to go 
abroad tin's summer, and will 
spend her vacation at Martha's 
Vineyard. Rangely Lakes, in 
Maine Miss Abarbanell will re- 
sume the role of "Ilsa" in the 
"Student King" when that opera 
goes entour next season. 

Camillo Saint - Saens. the 
world renowned composer, con- 
ductor and pianist will visit 
America this coming winter. 
American impresarios have 
tempted Saint-Saens the past 
twenty-five years with offers to 
visit this countrv but always 



THE FLETGHER MUSIG METHOD 

Simplex and Kindergarten 

TAUCHT AT 

THE FLETCHER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
2251 Clinton Ave. Phone Alameda 1264 

ALAMEDA 

This system places the study of music on a truly psycho- 
logical and educational basis; hence the drudgery is elimin- 
ated, and the pupils develop naturally and artistically, 
learning to express themselves, not merely to be copyists. 

The Fletcher Music Method has completely revolution- 
ized the old systems of teaching music to children. 

Residence 225 1 Clinton Avenue 
Alameda* Cal. 



La Grande Laundry 



Of San Francisco 



is now located at 



234 1 2th St., 



San Francisco, Cal. 



EAT 



Moraghan's Oyster House 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

Now open at 1212 Golden Gate Avenue. 

You know our oysters. Wholesale and 

retail. 
A messenger always in attendance for immediate 
delivery of Oysters in bottles, Oyster Cocktails. 
Oyster, Chicken or Squab Loaves. 
6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 



Dr. Geo. J. Bucknall 



Office and Residence 



1121 Laguna St. 



San Francisco 



Emmons Draying and 

Safe Moving Company 

Wreckers, General Contractors 

318 Market Street also 1060 Broadway 

San Francisco Oakland 

The most complete outfit in San Francisco 

Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 

SUPPLIES DYNAMOS 

MOTORS REPAIRS 

Century Electric Construction Co. 
IS Fell St,., near Market. San Francisco 

Hiram W. Johnson 

Attorney-at-Law 

Has removed his office to 1905 
Webster Street, corner Pine, San 
Francisco. 









jist ni.i. the niu. 

The Rio Grande 
Scenic Line Excursions 

For Women 
and Children . 
Traveling Alone 

Personally Conducted to the East 
NO CHANGE OF CARS 

Details — also free books of 
travel, handsomely illustrated, 
may be had of 

W. .1 SHOTWBLL. General Agent 
DENVER AND RIO GRANDE It ll 

1070 BROADWAY. OAKLAND. CAL. 



Rock Island 
Frisco Lines 



Passenger and Freight Offices 
OAKLAND— 410 Fourteenth Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO— Ferry Station 



F. W. THOMPSON, 
General Western Agent. 



Paper of Every Description 

A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

405 Jackson St., San Francisco. 



51 4 Eleventh St. Oakland 
114 K St. Sacramento 



113 H. Los Angeles St. L. A. 
54 First St. Portland, Or. 



From liiiKin 

il only 

unitv ol h 
• St musician ll 
era produced. \l. - 

mill nil other n 

Down in nil 

'I countrii i pian- 

ist he will U- new to Ami 
Many nf the great pianists of the 
i their 
finishing touches from iln> celeb- 
rity and all proclaim him the 
master of the key-board. All the 
leading symphony orchesti 

•iintr.v will invite Saint- 
Saens i" conduct his own compo- 
sitions and in some of the cities 
lie will interpret his own piano- 
forte concertos with orchestra. 
'I he coming of this master mind 
will prove the distinct musical 
event of the last five years and 
will (In much to advance musical 
effort in America. Bernhard 
Ulrich, who will direct the tour 
has successfully managed other 
great artists the past EeM years 
including d'Albert, Rubenstein 
and Mark ETamboure. 



New York detectives have ar- 
rested a man who advertises for 
women with money, marries 
them and then robs them. Hfl 
must be a European nobleman in 
disguise. 



Kaiser William talks of send- 
ing his fourth son to an Ameri 
can university. He wouldn't 
dare risk any more important 
than the fourth in our football 
games. 



General Koslov was killed, ia 
Russia Saturday by an assassin 
who mistook him for General 
Trepoff. But as long as it was 
a general it doesn't matter much. 



Rockefeller isn't so bad as he 
is painted. He has been in 
Europe several weeks and the 
country still belongs to its orig- 
inal owners. 



WESTINGHOUSE 
Electric Manufacturing company 

Westinghouse Air and Traction Brake Co. 

.San Francisco office: 1843 Fillmore Street 

Oakland office: 1115 Broadway 

Phone Oakland 7482. W. W. Briggs, Mgr. -por several weeks our Secre- 

. tary of State will Root around 

among the Smith American Re- 
publics. 



A burglar tired to rob an un- 
dertaking parlor in Los Angeles 
Saturday night, but an employe? 
put up such a "stiff" fight that 
the interloper fled. 



Absolutely the Best French Laundry Work 

AT MODERATE PRICES 



E. CANDEVAN, 
1925 Sutler Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone West 1901 



Whether or not Roosevelt will 
run again disturbs him less than 
it does his enemies. 



G. Lederer 



"THE HAIR STORK 1 



is now located at 2271 CALIFORNIA ST 



Hftir-dmanf. Shampoo*. Wifli. Touprtl. 



GERMEA 

FOR 

BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE COMPANY, AGENTS 



O. F. Willey 
Company 



Estab- 
lished 
1855 



Have re-opened at 

19 Fell Street 

Near Market Street. 
San Francisco Tel. Special 336 



165-167 13th St. 

Bet. Madison and Jackson Sts. 
Oakland Tel. Oakland 8062 



With a full line of 



Surreys, Runabouts, Etc. 



COME AND SEE 



.54 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 21, 1906 



If. 



Maltltoid 
Roofing--- 
P. & B. Goods 



^ 



% 



For temporary or permanent buildings— 
quickly laid by anyone — waterproof, fire 
resisting and a durable roof. Sales de- 
partment in San Francisco at 1306 Post 
Street. Factory uninjured, orders deliv- 
ered immediately. Address 



THE PARAFFINE PAINT CO. 

Main Office — Union Savings Bank. 
Building, Oak/and, Cal. Tele- 
phone Oakland 75G7. 



Union Lumber 



J 



Company 



REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER 

Railroad Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles, 

Split Shakes, Etc. Main Office, 20G-207-208 

Crocker Bldg. Telephone Private Ex. 624. 

Yards and Planing Mills 

Sixth and Channel Streets, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Columbus Savings & Loan Society 



Mont* 



I ffa 



i».-i..i 



For the half year ending Juno 80, 1006, ft dlviocnd has noon do- 
ctored n\ the rate of three and lix-tenths (3 8-10] per conl per annum 
on nil doponltn, [rei ol laici, payable on and after MONDAY. July 3, 

1000. Dividend* not called for arc added to and bcai the wmt rate of 
intercut as tlio principal from July I, 1000. 

F. N. BELGRANO. Cashier. 1. W. HELLMAN.Jr .President 
ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of trai Ineai San Pranolfoo California. 
Location "f works, Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada, 

Nol - hereby (Ivor that :>t a mooting "i the Board ••! Directors. 

held on the Oth day of July, 1000, an assessment [No &) of ton (10) 
eanti par sharo waa levied upon the capital itooi "f the corporation, 
payable Immediately in United State ■ [old coin, to the leeretarj . al 

the office of the company. 3:1(1 Uin.li Street, Sun Fran Ct (CO, California. 

Any itook upon which this aaseiiuionl shall remain unpaid on the 
10th day of augn.it, 1000, will bo delinquent nnd advertised for tale nl 

pnbllc auction, and, uuloM payment i* made before, will I Id on 

FRIDAY, the 31st day of august, 1006, at 1 o'clneli p m,, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with t » i ._- coil ,.f advertising and cx- 
peniee "f sale. By order of tho B^nrd of Din CtOl 

JOHN W TWIGGS, Secretary, 

Office. 330 Bush itreet, San Francisco, California, 



What* we can do! \ ! 

Refirtish silverware damaged by fire 

LIKE NEW 

HAMMERSMITH & FIELD 

Modern Jewelers 

Corner Van Ness Ave. and Eddy Street 

New Shopping District 
Phone EMERGENCY 138 



NOT THE FIRST LEGIS- 
LATURE. 

It may be interesting to know 
that the present Uouma is not 
the first legislative assembly ever 
held in Russia. One hundred 
and thirty years ago Catherine 
11, under the influence of the 
French theorists who cleared the 
way for the great revolution, es- 
tablished an assembly with an 
upper and a lower house acting 
in unison. Established is the 
word that is peculiarly titting as 
it was hers — not unlike an im- 
perial toy — to do with as sho 
willed. It was her habit to sit 
behind a curtain listening to the 
delegates, and when a member 
t rem lied on her privileges or sug- 
gested limiting her rights or 
powers he was strangely missing 
in a day or two. 

All ili i- did not prevent her 
writing to Diderot : "As to us, 
we think, and we look upon it as 
iiur glory to say it, that we only 
exist for the sake of our popula- 
tions. May God prevent it that, 
a tier the labors of this legislative, 
assembly are finished there 
should be any people on earth 
governed more justly, and there- 
fore more prosperous than our 
own." 

Despite the apparent earnest- 
ness of this, Russian statesmen 
lilt a peculiar distaste Cor Bib 
pastime of even suggesting an 
improvement on Catherine's sys- 
tem of governing like an auto- 
crat. As a result the first legis- 
lature of the unhappy country 
fell into disuse. 



r 



E % 



JOHN ROTHSCHILD &G0. 

11, 13, 15 Spear Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SOLE AGENTS 

SUtmr anfr iHoBfll? 
Wmta 




EHRMAN BROS. &. CO., Distributers Cor- 
ner Ellis and Steiner Streets, San Francisco. 
A. Santaella & Co., Tampa, Fla. 



TOPICS FOR 

MUCK RAKERS. 

Short shame? for busy men. 

Beer wears a higher collar 

every rear. 

Treason of the government's 
Ethnological Bureau. 

Xow parlor game: Kolten rot- 
ten, who ain't rotten? — New 
York Sun. 



von 

state as 



CONSIDERATE. 
Wife — I'm sorry to see 
come home in such a 

this, Charles. 

Eusband — T knew you'd be 
sorry. Carrie, and that's why 1 
told' you not to sit up."— Boston 
Transcript. 

VOLUNTARY EVIDENCE. 

••But surely you are the man 
1 gave son,,' pie to a fortnight 
ago." 

"Yes, lidy; I though! p raps 
you'd like to know I'm able to 
gel about again." — The Tallin: 



The Best 

#2.50 and #3.50 

HATS 

at 

Herrmann & Co. 

1718 Market, Street. 

Between Polk St. and Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Bekins Van and Storage 

Cut rate Shippers 

Telephone Us 

W. and J. SLOANE & CO. 

Now Located at 

Van Ness and Sutter Streets, - San Francisco 



81, 1906. 

v.vi/ 182 

ION. 

'nm < lull under 



9 

■r the 
ido, «riti<-n 

l)V II ■ 

■uli.i.' ne» • 
- woman attending : 
rention ai a rcprescntati 

<>r similar 
publication. R rning 

bave been framed and 
will Ih- sent to any one inl 
who will apply to tin 
of tin 1 convention committee, 
Room 310 Railway Exchange 
Building, Denver, Colo. Epi- 
tomised, the rules require that 
the writer musl !"• an actual 
workini: newspaper man or wom- 
an and tin* must In' shown to the 
satisfaction of tin- committee. 
Intention to compete must \«- an- 
nounced within a certain time by 
notification to the committee of 
judges and tfie articles musl be 
submitted within a stated limit 
of time. In judging, tin- rules 
provide that the value of articles 
published as advertisement to the 
State of Colorado shall be the 
first consideration. The most 
attractive prize thus far offered 
by the Denver Press club is a 
-old bar valued at $1,000. This 
liar was presented to the club by 
Mr. Fred G. Shaffer, a prominent 
mining man of Denver, hut 
formerly one of the active bunco 
of newspaper men in that city. 



- 






f 



THE DAY WE CELEBRATE. 

Poeticus — Ah, the Glorious 
Fourth, in which we celebrate 
our independence and liberty! 

Cvnicus — Oh. yes! by being 
independent for liberty from an- 
noyance only by going to a place 
where there are no other human 
beings. — A merican Spectator. 



WITHOUT FEAR OR FAVOR 
Grace — No! I wouldn't let you 

kiss me if you were the only man 

at a summer hotel ! 

Jack — You can bet I wouldn'' 

worry about it if I had a cinch 

like that. — American Spectator. 



Mount Shasta 



■\ 



The most beautiful mountain in America— snow 

capped the year around. 



Wei! worth a long journey simply to 
see it once. But come here and 
live a few days or weeks. Finest 
of trout-streams, finest of camping 
places. Many hotels, resorts and 
mineral springs around its base. 



Get information and make arrangements with 

our agents. 

Southern Pacific 



r 



J 



^ 



A Full Stock of 

Chipped and Ground Glass 

At 1818 1-2 POST STREET 
Pacific Window Glass Co. 



BACIGALUPI 



OLD SPIRITS. 

"Pa," said little Willie, look- 
ing up from his book, "what does 
'the spirit of '76' mean?" 

"Well," replied Lushman, 
"that's usually a fake. I don't 
believe there is any thirty-year- 
old whisky on the market to- 
day." — Philadelphia Press. 



New Buon Gusto 
Restaurant 

1017-1019 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

Ravioli every day 



—J 
Real Estate Company 

John Partridge, President 
759 Fillmore Street San Francisco 



"DON'T BORROW TROUBLE." BUY 

SAPOLIO 



'TIS CHEAPER IN THE END. 



5G 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.Iuly 81, 1906. 



1£<B 



Tn® 



(A Study) By Silver Pen (Theresa Corlette.) 

Persons who profess the Christian religion must keep 
in their hearts a green spot wherein the sanctity of mar- 
riage is preserved as a natural law from which there is 
no receding. Marriage has been from the beginning, 
and must last indisputably until the very end. and let 
us hope that it is not in all eases a " failure." 

It is we, the inhabitants of this world, who are failures, 
not the institution, which is the only one mil of which 
law and order can spring. There are two sides of the 
question to be discussed. 

In the past we may remember that marriage was looked 
upon as a holy alliance: one to be entered into after 
mature deliberation, and only under fortuitous circum- 
stances. A man would as soon have thought id' putting 
his head in the lire as asking a woman to be his wife un- 
less he had a comfortable Inane to take her to. 

He, having seen the maiden of his choice, would seek 
not only her consent but that of her parents, and after 
being engaged solemnly, that man. if not then in cir- 
cumstances to marry immediately, would put forth his 
whole powers of head and heart to win some fair, sweet 
nest in which to shrine his dove. 

These two happy beings would wait patiently, perhaps 
for years, for the hour of emancipation from all other 
ties but that existing between themselves, and when 
married would, in perfect happiness, settle down in their 
home, even however lowly the lol might be. and there 
would be seen in the halls of the rich, as in the cottages 
of the poor, the same spirit of home attachment, the same 
assiduity on the part of the mistress of either domicile, 
to make such a home of love for the husbands who had 
chosen them iVoni out of the ranks of all other women. 

Husbands found pleasure in home-life long ago, and 
when tired, after the professional or business employ- 
ments of the day, would ask no greater happiness than 
to pass their long, happy evenings with their wives; or 
when little voices and paltering feel echoed through hall 
or cottage, to gather the children around the winter lire 
or gambol with them on flower-scented lawns or grass- 
carpeted fields. 

Long ago, the thought of which comes to us who have 
seen it like the reflection of a bright dream, wife and chil- 
dren looked eagerly for the coming of the beloved parent, 

whose image held sway in each heart during absence, and 
each married woman felt happy in her wifehood, glorying 
in the joy of her home 

Men diil nol startle the world with the theory they 
promulgate (inlay, that they "won't be owned." They 
were happy to be owned by good and faithful wives, and 
even the youngest men were nol satisfied until they bad 
their own fireside. Families weul to church together and 
brought up the little ones in the right way. and no one 
was ever beard to discuss the possibility of marriage being 
a "failure." 

Things are different today. Just as soon as a girl 
leaves school she is on the lookout for a "man with 
money," no matter how old the gentleman may be, if he 
can give her diamonds and those other accessories Eor 
which the woman of todaj seems solely to live. 

She who is fortunate enough to find wealth in the man 
who chooses her. does nol enter upon her new state with 
any feeling that there are duties of importance attached 
to her new position. Oh. no; she indulges her dream to 
the full. She is a butterny who tries her newly gilded 
wings for the first time. She takes her cup of pleasure 
filled to the very brim, and when children gather round 



her knees she has for them nurses and governesses, but 
in no way attempts to over-burden herself with care on 
their account. She is not a bad wife or mother, but a 
careless one; her husband and children are not her first 
and only thought, and little by little estrangement begets 
divorce, and the world pronounces upon the "failure" of 
the tie. 

The woman who marries a man in medium circum- 
stances only, would scorn to "keep house." Xo, indeed; 
she wants a "good time." She boards, and here her first 
troubles commence. To be boxed up day by day with one 
person, with only the one room, or even suite, except at 
meal hours, to call their own. would lead the most devoted 
couple to the brink of suicide. Caged up in this way, 
every little foible and fault stands out in bold relief, and 
man and woman both grow weary, and arrive at the con- 
clusion to each "go their own way." 

The curse of happiness is idleness, and a young woman 
With no home duties to keep her employed, and no wish 
lo undertake such, cannot fail to be unhappy, for the 
institution of marriage calls absolutely for a renunciation 
of worldly frivolity and a taking on of those delightful 
responsibilities which ought to be to the happily married 
the principal point of attraction. Even in this retro- 
grading age we still see here and there a girl wdiose whole 
soul is wrapped up in the mantle of her home. She takes 
pride in its adornment, and her husband has always a joy 
before him in the thought lliat after the troubles of the 
day there is a bright fireside and a loving wife lo greet 
him. In such instances marriage can never be a 
"failure." 

What is the matter with so many of the men to-day ? 

Restless, erratic, lacking in stability; now. can anything 

they undertake be aught but a failure!-' What is the 
matter with the women? Silly, vain, passionately fond 
ol' dress and display, diamonds and dime novels, how do 
they expect to make of that holy institution, marriage, 
anything but a parody? What is the matter with the 
mothers? Surely it is clearly the first duly of a mother 
to train up her children with a thorough knowledge of 
the duty that lies at their door as wife or husband. If 
these things are not learned at home, line upon line, 
precept upon precept, how can the young be expected to 
excel in those domestic antics that make home a haven of 
res! and love. 

It is not the marriage tie that is in any way a failure. 
Whv should it be more so now. in the enlightened nine- 
teeiilli century, than it was in the days of darkness and 
superstition? There can be no reason, except that 

possibly we are growing too much enlightened, educated 

loo much, and yei too little. It is "the people of the 
people" who are slipping back, who are satiated with the 
wine of pleasure, the people who do not grow from in- 
fancy to youth slowly, and from youth to age. in tc7n- 
perate measure, but who are born babies only to be 
thrust by their silly parents into the caps and gowns of 
womanhood ere their second teeth are cut. 

While men and women live in a round of pleasure, 
over-sensual, overbearing, having no religion or sense of 
decorum, how can wedded love live in such all atmos- 
phere? If husbands and wives do not love deeply enough 
to live for each other, renouncing (he frivolities of life 
for (he serene joys of home, why many at all until they 

have sobered down and feel (he need of rest. There is 

nothing the matter with marriage; it is to-day as it has 

ever been, but the people are different, different in their 

ideas, in their affections, in everything, and. forgetting 
their own shortcomings, they lay their grievance on the 
shoulders of marriage, and' by their own incompetence 
make of it a "failure." But woe to us when marriage is 
wiped out. 

(Son Fnimixii) News Letter, Dec. 15, 1888, 









H®r Aisw 



■ ■■ held nr. 
In her l>- 
Shunned my eye* thai craved an 

Touched mj hand in good-nigh) greeting. 

Should I leave to-morrow- oarly? 

Then adieu ! 
Bent her head in farewell courteous, 

Onward passed : 
While 11 cold hand gripped my heart-string 

Held them t 
Still 1 waited, Mill I listened ; 

All in v smi I 
Trembled in the eyes thai watched her. 

And she - 
Up the Btairs with measured Footsteps, 

Bui she turned 
Where a lamp in brazen bracket 

Brightlv burned, 
Showed me all the glinting ripples 

Of her hair, 
Veiled her eyes in violei shadow — 

Glimmered where 
Curved her mouth in soft compliance, 

A- -In' bent 
Toward me from the dusky vailing 

Whole she leant. 
Ah. my love! One while hand wanders 

To her hair. 
Slowly lifts the rose that nestles 

Softly there; 
Breathes she in its heart my answer 

Shyly sweet, 
And Love's message mutely flutters 

To my feet. 
— 3an Francisco News Letter, February 3, 1S77. 



A WARNING. 
Communicated. 



That the city of San Francisco is only one block of 
buildings less to-day, instead of one hundred, is in no 
manner owing to the efficiency of our water supply; 
whilst the fight made by our brave firemen with the fire 
fiend, the other night, was worthy of all praise. The 
lesson that is the natural outcome of that occasion is one 
that should be taken into most serious consideration by 
our citizens, else some fine morning it will turn out that 
San Francisco has suffered the calamitous fate of Chicago. 
The truth is apparent that our present supply of water is 
totally inadequate to control a large fire. Not only was 
it found that the mains were too small, but that the water 
source was well nigh exhausted. Next day the pressure 
was so slight that water could not be obtained in the upper 
stories for domestic purposes. This clearly shows that 
however large the main, the supply would be insufficient. 
That broad fact has a terrible meaning, when we contem- 
plate the possibility and even the extreme probability 



McMahon 
Keyer <8k 
Stiegeler 
Bros. 
Inc. 




Van Ness Ave. at Ellis 
O'Farrell Street at Fillmore 



of a great 6re. Our city contains no less than three hun- 
ched millions worth of property thai ma} be consumed 
by fire. A big blaze and a high wind are all thai is 
necessary to wipe this immense value oui of existence. 
Whilst we are in this helpless condition, commission after 
commission goes junketing among the mountains and 
talks large about a great water supply, and talk is all 
that comes of it. Years must elapse before any mountain 
reservoir is tapped, and its contents brought to the city. 
Meanwhile, cannot something be done? On both sides 
of the peninsular the Pacific ebbs and flows in boundless 
profusion. At a very moderate outlay a vast supply of 
this ocean water might be stored up in a reservoir on 
some elevated position, and in case of Are the city might 
be well-nigh inundated, if necessary. Six months of 
time, and two millions of money, would do the business 
so effectively that we should thereafter be absolutely fire- 
proof. Surely a consummation so devoutly to be prayed 
for would abundantly justify so small an expenditure ! 
— San Francisco News Letter, September 2, 1S76. 




\i}$ styap of &ttt?lftom 

Haberdashers 

for 

Gentlemen 

Hyman C& Lipman 



1449 FILLMORE STREET 



58 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 190G. 



Continental 
Casualty Company 

CHICAGO 

Writes all forms of Accident and Health 
Insurance. 

Saved all its records and is doing busi- 
ness as heretofore. 

Producers and all others interested address 

W. H. BETTS, 

Manager. 
54 and 55 Bacon Building, Oakland, Cal. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Go. of North America 

of Philadelphia, Penn. 
Alliance of Philadelphia 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 5,622,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 
1815 Franklin Street, San Francisco. 

AACHEN & MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE CO. 
HANOVER FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Cesar Bertheau, Manager; Alfred R. 
Grimm, Assistant Manager. N. E. 
Corner Clay and Eleventh Streets, 
Oakland, Gal. 

Pacific Surety Company 

of CALIFORNIA 
FIDELITY COURT AND CONTRACT 
BONDS 
PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Bonds for lost policies, bank books, or 
change of occupancy will be furnished by 
this Company. 

Paid-up Capital $250,000 

Cash Assets 428,000 

Officers: Wallace Everson, President; 
John Bermlngham, Vice-President; A. P. 
Redding, Secretary. 

Temporary office, 652 Broadway, 
Oakland, California. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd 

of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents, 

416 Jackson St. San Francisco 



Phenix Insurance Company 

of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

J. H. LENEHAN, General Agent. 

A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast. 

Temporary Offices: 

Polytechnic Hall, Corner 12th and Harrison Sts. 

Oakland 



THE COUNTRY'S SAVIORS. 

Strange rumors are flying 
through the air concerning the 
Democratic candidacy for Presi- 
dent. It is hinted that the en- 
dorsemeiit of Bryan by several 
SI all's is a scheme to get the rank 
and iili' together and work up a 
lot of enthusiasm for the party, 
so that when the time comes, the 
believers in old fashioned Demo- 
cracy will be sufficiently aroused 
(o control the nomination; if 
not control it by numerical 
strength, to so impress delegates 
that unless not only a strong 
man is nominated, but one who 
has not been running off after 
strange gods, they will retire to 
the background, as they have 
been doing since 1896. That 

would mean quite another i i 

from Bryan, or if it should ap- 
pear that it would be wise to 
take up the Nebraska)!, he would 
have to accept and faithfully ad- 
here to a platform which the 
"old liners " would formulate. 
Bryan claims to adhere to Jef- 
fersonian principles, but his in- 
terpretation of them is not 
generally believed to be sound or 
sensible. The "old liners " in- 
sist that if Jeffersonian Democ- 
racy is not conservative it is 
nothing, and if that fact can- 
not be impressed upon the con- 
vention they will not participate 
actively in the campaign. It 
begins to look like old times for 
the party when the party da- 
clared its principles and lifted a 
man to them, rather than lit the 
principles to the vagaries of an 
experimental politician. Bryan 
is, therefore, not at all necessary 
to the party, so the old and many 
of the new-timers say. 



The boom that has been 
launched for Speaker Cannon 
is spreading like wild fire all 

over the Middle and Noiih-wesi 
States, very much to the chagrin 
of President Poosevelt, whose 
hear! is set on Taft for the 
honor, and on himself next to his 
War Secretary. New England 

and some of the other Eastern 
States are talking pretty loudly 
for Littlelield from Maine, and 
a boom for him will undoubtedly 
be started, and it might reach 
threatening dimensions. Vice- 
President Fairbanks has a very 
much better understanding of 
the situation since he had a pri- 
vate talk with Cannon last week, 
and there are indications that he 
will take a seat in " Uncle 
Joe's " wagon. 

A month ago the Gubernator- 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company 

Of London and Edinburgh. 
Combined Assets Over 
Eighty-Seven Millions. 
To the Public and Our Patrons : 

The North British will pay all fire 
losses just as soon as adjusted. Our of- 
fice for handling all loss claims is locat- 
ed in the Tribune building, northwest 
corner of Eighth and Franklin streets, 
Oakland. Our office for general lire busi- 
ness is at 2027 Sutter street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Tom C. Grant, Genera] Agent for Pacific Department. W. J 
Nichols, General Adjuster. 



Fire 



Marine 



New Zealand Ins. Co. 



Auckland, N. Z. 



$1,250,000. 
$2,025,000. 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders 



Cash Capital 
Reserves 



3 1 2 California St. 



San Francisco, Cal 



G. J. STOVEL 



Temporary headquarters 



Bacon Building 



Oakland 



Phone Oakland 987. 



Our clients and friends are requested to 

renew their policies and bring in notices 

of loss to the above address. 

Fire. Marine and Inland Insurance. 

Fireman's Fund 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $0,500,000 

Odd Fellows' Building, 

Cor. Eleventh and Franklin Sts., Oakland. 

Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 



of Hartford. Established 1850. 



Capital 

Total assets 

Surplus to Policy Holders 



jM.txm.noo 
5.6I3.6I9 
2.729. 1 73 



BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific 
Department, 525 13th St., Oakland. 
COLIN M. BOYD. Agent. 






- 






of the F 

I, nml 
.•«> hall up to 

■ 

undergo many changes, onleaa 

three h*i way to 

nearly a bill 

dollars in appro which 

•ted for by the present rep- 

Brell OB 

the political Btomachs of the 

ranchers and orchardists of the 

and they are likely t" 
turn ihiiiL's op-side down in 
some districts. This California 
the boiled-down 
judgment of gome of the clearest- 
beaded "big men" of the Re- 
publican party in the State. 

One of the ablest politicians 
.11 the State said the other day: 
Ton fellows over there," point- 
ing across the bay, "do nol seem 
to realize that the catastrophe 
by earthquake and fire lias 
eliminated San Francisco from 
the politics of the State ns an 
influential factor. Your voting 
population has heen so scattered 
thai yon don't count for much Ert.bHii«d 1824 
now, and your slates are likely 
to be broken before you have a 
chance to exhibit them. No, 
San Francisco will cut no figure 
in State politics for a long time. 
We fellows in the interior will 
run things. Nearly all the 
Fourth and the San Francisco 
end of the Fifth districts are in 
ruins and without much of a 
voting population. It may be 
that a gerrymandering will be 
attempted on that account." So, 
it would seem, San Francisco's 
great calamity might take on a 
political aspect in the interest 
of practical partisan politics. 
Sometimes when it rains it 
pours. 



California Insurance Company 



Of S»n Francisco 



1 ( Wfice (aftei June 1st >. 



MO California St.. S.F. 



Time for Riving notice of loss or filing proofs will be extended 
on request. Our adjusters wilt make up proofs of all losses 
adjusted without expense to claimants. 

M. A. NEWELL, President. 
GEO. W. BROOKS, Secretary. 



AMERICAN CENTRAL INSURANCB CO. 
SAINT PAIL F. 8 H. INSURANCE CO. 
MERCANTILE F. & M. INSURANCE CO. 
LLOYDS PLATE GLASS INSURANCE CO. 

San Francisco City Business Office Removed to 
1Q1Q QIITTFR QTR F PT between fillmore and 

1/1 / OU 1 1 Ct\ J I l\LL 1, WEBSTER STREETS 

All Losses Adjusted at the Oakland Office 
Telegraph Avenue and 20th Street 
1150 SAN FRANCISCO LOSSES cytDJUSTED AND PAID TO DATE 

Christensen, Edwards & Goodwin, Managers 



"\ 



Scottish Union and National Ins, Go. 



Of Edinburgh, Scotland 



Cpiul. $30,000,000 



Assels over $45,000,000 



Temporary offices, 468 Eleventh Street, Bacon 
Block, Oakland, Cal. 



Pacific Department 

NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE 
SOCIETY 

of Norwich, England 



E. H. TICKLE B. SAVART 


TICKLE & CO. 


PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 


TINTING 


Temporary Address 


886 Sixty-first Street, Oakland, Cal. 



314 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
San Francisco California 



One of the unnoticed and yet n ,. 

most conspicuous proofs of the TliB London Assurance Corporation 

restoration of public confidence ... _. . n 

is the facility of the local sorites MgM Fife InSU^CC LO. 

in filling the sporting pages of 

the daily papers. W - J - LANDERS, Pac. Coast Manager 

Reeds Hall, 13th and Harrison Sts., Oakland 



Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $539,642.25 

Pacific Coast Casualty Go. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, 
Elevators, Workmen's Collective, Vessels, Bur- 
glary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John 
C. Coleman, Vice-President; F. A. Zane, Secre- 
tary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Peer- 
ing, Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bo thin, Edwai'd 
L. Bravton, John C .Coleman, F. P. Deering, 
E. F. Green, I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. 
Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, Adoiph A. Son, William 
S. Tevis. 
Temporary office, 2324 Clay St., San Francisco. 

Marshal A. Frank Company, General Agents 
for California. 

Kohl Building, San Francisco. 



The Chicago man who has 
wagered $50,00 that he can quit 
smoking cigarettes, will prove, 
if he lives, to have more money 
than vertebrae. 



Buy Insurance That Insures 
In "DoIlar-for-Dollar" Companies 



THE CALIFORNIA DOOR COMPANY Guyett C& Hauer 



GENERAL INSURANCE BROKERS 



Looters of the ruins are ar- 
rested and looters of the relief 
fund go free. 



DOORS— WINDOWS 



16th Street Station. Oakland 



2127 Fillmore St., 
San Francisco 
Phone WEST 4918 



468 llth St., 

Oakland 

Phone OAKLAND 3432 




FORT VIGILANT. — Rooms of the committee. Sacramento street, between Davis and Front. 



l.illin.. Justh & Co. 




fi ,m 





Mass meeting, endorsing the acts o£ the Vigilance committee, June 14, 1856. 












Tina© L®v<b 9 s TtnffiKB ®ff IBtoy 



And I tend yon tl 

the morn 

When in :in. 

And «■" 

There's an •■ I ti-li spell in twilight 

When the bats of Fancy fly, 
And sense is bonnd by a question, 

Anrl Fate by the quick reply. 

And the moon is an old enchantress, 

With li>T - glimmer and shade, 

That have ever been false and fatal 
To the dreams of man and maid. 

Hut I'll meet yon at noonday, sweetheart, 

In the billowy fields of grain. 
When the snn is li< >r for harvest. 
And the roses a-thirst for rain. 

Willi the daylight's truth on your forehead, 

And tin' daylight's love in your eye. 
I'll kiss yon withoul a question, 

And you'll kiss me without reply. 

->'</» Francisco News Letter. December 8, 1S77. 



EARLY IDEAS OF CALIFORNIA. 

(The following article, from a long-out-of-print work, 
published in London in 17'47, shows how little was known 
of this State even so short a time as ICO years ago.) 

The more southern part of California was known to 
the Spaniards very soon after the discovery of Mexico, 
but it remained a hundred and twenty years a matter ol 
dispute whether it was an island or a peninsula. Tn Sim- 
sons, and other maps in good credit, we see it laid down 
as an island, with a pretty wide sea between it and the 
continent of New Mexico. However, in the latesi maps, 
particularly in one published in Holland in 1739, it is 
laid down as a peninsula, as it really is. In 1595, the 
Spaniards sent a galleon, called St. Augustine, to dis- 
cover its coasts, but it was lost in the Port de los Reyes, 
which prevented any further discovery at that time. In 
1602, the Count de Monterey, then Viceroy of New Spain. 
sent Sebastian Viscaino on the same design, with two 
splendid ships and a tender. He sailed as high as Cape 
Mendocino, which lies in 41 deg. 20 min. ST. L., whence 
he had a sight of Camp Blanco, or the White Cape, 
which lies in 43 deg. In 1684, the Marquis de la Laguna, 
Viceroy of New Spain, sent two ships with' a tender 
to discover the Lake of California — that is, the sea be- 
tween it and New Mexico — of which, however, he ob- 
tained a very indifferent account. Thenceforward the opin- 
ion prevailed that California was not an Island, but pari 
of that vast continent which joins America to Asia. 

According to the best maps we have, California extends 
from 23 deg. 40 min. to 45 deg. N. L. Its utmost, 
extent from north to south — that is, from the strait 
discovered by Martin Aguilar to Cape St. Lucas — it must 
be near eight hundred miles. Its breadth is very unequal ; 
for towards the north it is two hundred miles broad; but 



it mpor» away tows hardly 

the Vermillion Sea, and by I 

lUth llllrl i 

n the temp 
that the i 

In tl 

. ami in the 
« inter it old. 

The country is finely diversified with plains and moun- 

well \\ led ami wati red. lb ery fruitful, 

abounding with fruit and trees, and producing, when 
planted, nil the kinds of grain which grow m Europe. 
There Bre two kinds of deer peculiar to the country. Ill 
of fowls and birds common either in Europe or tho 
Indies abound here. There is also prodigious plenty 
and riveT fish; and. in a word, a more plentiful 
country cannot be wished for. Thai there are mines is 
very probable, though aol certain; bul it is known thai 
here i- one of the richesl pearl fisheries in tin- world: so 

that it i> not eaS] to guess why no more pains Inn.' 1 n 

taken to settle so advantageous ■■< trad of land. It has 
several small rivers, and two pretty considerable ones, \i/... 
Rio Colorado and Rio du Carmel, a greal variety of fine 
ports, both on tin' east and wesl side, with bays, creeks 
and roads innumerable, which is the reason why it was 

a mli frequented by our privateers in the South Sea. 

The natives of the islands, who are still in possession 
of ii. have been differently characterized by our writers 

and by the Spaniards: it is, therefore, safest to rely on 
what Father Kuhn tells ns concerning them, because be 
conversed longer with them, and more familiarly than 

any other person who has left ns memoirs. He informs 

us that these people, who arc tolerably well made, and 

very ingenious, live will t houses, contenting themselves 

with the shade afforded them by trees in the summer, and 
dwelling in raves in the winter. They are not altogether 
void of religion, since they have been observed to kneel 
and pray on the first appearance of the new moon, and 
to show a greai docility in receiving the principles of the 
Christian religion, which, however, no great pains have 
been taken to propagate amongst them. As to Govern- 

m. they arc absolutely in a stale of nature — every mail 

is both a sovereign and a legislator in bis own family, 
which is attended with great inconveniences, there being 
continual feuds amongst them, which break out sometimes 
into broils and bloodshed. 

There are in California two curiosities, which, as they 
are well supported in point of authority, deserve to be 
taken notice of. After the raiiv season is over, there 
falls in the morning a great quantity of dew, which, set- 
tling upon rose-leaves, candies and becomes hard, like 
manna, having all the sweetness of sugar, though it is 
not so while, and consequently not so pleasant to the 
eye. In the heart of the country there arc plains of salt, 
ouite firm and clear as crystal, which, considering the vast 
plenty of fish of all sorts which are to be found there, 
might prove of great advantage to any civilized people 
who were possessed of ibis country. Rut it does not ap- 
pear that the natives make any use of this salt for curing 
their fish, which they generally eat raw, as they also do 
flesh and roots. 

The Spaniards, for a long Iracl of time, wholly neg- 
lected this valuable peninsula, and it is hut very lately 
that they have bad any settlement there. At present they 
have only a village in its southern extremity, near Cape 
St. Lucas, which is called by the name of the place itself, 
California. The Manila ships touch here sometimes in 
their course to Acapulco, and no doubt in time this will be- 
come a very considerable place by their trading with the 
Indians for pearl, 



62 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1006. 



Cook With Gas 

To 
Cheer the Home 
Bake the Bread 
And Roast the Meats 
That Make the Man 

Fuel Gas at 90 cents. 

Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company 

13th and Clay Streets, Oakland 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



San Francisco 



PAPER 



Temporary Office: 



419 11TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CAL. 



FIRE-PROOF 

BURLAP 

For Tacking on Walls 

Wall Paper 

UHL BROS., 7 1 7 Market St 

Doing Business at the Old Stand 



CARNEGIE BRICK AND POTTERY COMPANY 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile 

Fire Clay, Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, 

Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile 
Fire-Prcofing, Semi-Dry Pressed Brick, 
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe, Brick and Tile 
Mantels, Flue Linings, Urns and Vases, 
Flower Pots. All kinds of Vitrified Salt- 
Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tesla, Alameda County. Cal. 

Yards: San Francisco, Oakland. Berkeley. San Jose. 

Office, 10th and Division Sts., 

San Francisco 



The Waldorf 

Hair Store Branch 

3461 Sacramento Street> 
SWITCHES, WIGS AND HAIR ORNA- 
MENTS. 
Phone West 5806. 

John H. Ware 

Notary Public, Commissioner of Deeds, 1936 
Fillmore Street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone 
West 6098. At Western National Bank from 2 
to 3 p. m. 

DR. H. I. JONES 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, late Starr King 
building, will resume practice at his residence. 
228 East Sixteenth St.,Oakland. Phone East 82 



SUBURBAN. 

The restoration of the bars on 
the ferry-boats has brought joy 
to the thirsty souls who like to 
break the monotony of the trip 
across the bay by a friendly nip 
or two with friends. There is 
one of the commuters — a newly 
married one — who is a godsend 
in the way of drinks to all his 
fellow passengers. He is ex- 
tremely proud of his wife, and is 
always lauding her good qual- 
ities. He tells what a great 
housekeeper she is — then sug- 
gests that they all drink to her. 
Then he recalls her ability as a 
cook, which calls for another 
drink. She is beautiful beyond 
compare — a fact that brings out 
an enthusiastic talk, and another 
round of drinks. By the time 
the Oakland side is reached, ail 
her good qualities hare been 
toasted, but the husband isn't in 
a condition that will make her 
as proud of him as he is of her. 



What is known as the "rubber- 
neck" gang is a source of annoy- 
ance to passengers landing at the 
Alameda mole. The Oakland 
and Alameda trains arrive at th ■• 
mole before the boat from the 
San Francisco side does, and the 
passengers, while waiting to go 
aboard, line up on either side of 
the landing place and inspect the 
passengers who come ashore. Ii 
is no casual glance that they 
give (hem. but a careful and 

tl ugh looking over, calculated 

to make people of a retiring dis- 
position hurry through the 
gauntlet. What there ifi of deep 
interest in an ordinary commut- 
er's coming from a boat I do not 
know — but the "rubberneck' 1 
commuters seem fascinated by 
them. 



High Street, in the East End 
of Alameda, is developing a 
choice lot of young hoodlums, 
who soon will be emulating the 
".Tim Crow" gang of Fruitvale. 
They have the habit of patrolling 
the street and the road that it 
merges into in groups of half a 
dozen, shouting, yelling and us- 
ing filthy and profane language. 
The older ones among them are 
getting the whisky habit, and 
once in a while may be seen reel- 
ing along the street, intoxicated 
both by liquor and the conscious- 
ness of their terrible tlevilish- 

ness. A newly established pool- 

room is their gathering place, 
and what was a nice neighbor- 
hood is being spoiled by them. 
The will he an expense to the 



Gity Abstract Co., Inc. 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS 

69 City Hall Avenue 



Will resume business on or about June 5, 
1906. Bank renewals will be given imme- 
diate attention. 



--ALSO- 



Fire Insurance Corporations desiring in- 
formation as to record title of property 
covered by insurance can be furnished 
same promptly and on special terms. 



Dr. H. J. Stewart 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
Special course for angers desiring church ap- 
pointment*. 



STUDIO 1925 OCTAVIA ST., 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom 



Tailor 



2415 Fillmore Street., San Francisco 



Formerly of the Mutual Savings Bank Building. 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

Get the Habit 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marvel at the results. The "Argus" has 
many eyes, you only two, so let us do the work for you. Send 
five dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spengler, Director 

352 Third Ave. - - - New York City 



MANZANITA HALL, Palo Alto, Cal. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Every incentive to work and right living. Ideal 
dormitory system. One teacher to every five 
boys. Modern languages under foreign teachers. 
A new cinder track for thu coming year. Pre- 
pares more especially for Stanford or Yale and 
other Eastern Institutions. Catalogue on re- 
quest. 14th year. 

J. LEROY DIXON, Principal. 












BANKING 



Til Canadian Bak of Conerce 






BANKING 






•> CtmAlsrtunjltffd trt„ IUr>k of 

HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
•»!.!■ ut- Capital. I1O.0OO.MS 

A tat. 



Ladrvrnlth. NanoJmo Sew West* 

Vancouver 

White 

IN UNITE1 Portland. Seattle and 

vorlnp the princi- 
pal points ;• Saskatchewan. Manitoba 

BANKERS IN LONDON— Th« Bank of Ene- 

nank of Scotland. Lloyds' Bank. 

Ltd.. The Union of London and Smith's 

Ltd 

NTS IN CHICAGO— The First National 

Bank. 

S IN NEW ORI.KANS— The Commer- 
Tial Bank. 
San Francisco Office — 325 California Street. 
A. Kalns. Manager. Bruce Heatheote. Assist- 
ant Manager. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd, 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000 
raid-up Capital. 52,000.000 
Reserve Fund. $1,200,000 

HEAD OFFICE 40 Threadneedle St., Lon- 
don. E. C. 

Agents — New York — Agency of the London. 
Paris and American Bank. Limited, No. 10 
Wall street. N. Y. : Paris — Messrs. Lazard 
Freres Cie. IT Boulevard Poissonier. Draw 
direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIC. GREENEBAU.M. Manager; H. S. 
GREEN". Suh-Manager; R. ALTSCHUL, Cash- 
ier. ^^ 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building at 710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 300,000 

Surplus 32C.00O 

Deposits. January 1. 1006 10.213.801 

James P. Phelan, President; S. G. Murphy, 
Vice-President; James A. Hooper, Vice-Presid 
hi: George A. Story, Cashier; C. B. Hobson, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, 
John A. Hooper, James Moffltt. Frank J. Sul- 
livan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Jas. 
M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on ap- 
proved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, 
Fargo & Co., or exchange on city banks. 

Security Savings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 500.000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 280,000 

Banking by mail a specialty 

Directors— William Babcock. S. L. Abbott, 
O. D. Baldwin, Jos. D. Grant, E. J. McCut- 
chen. L. F. Monteagle, E. H. Pease, Warren 
D. Clark, James L. Flood, J. A. Donohoe, John 
Parrott, Jacob Stern. 

The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized, $C,000,000. 

Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $700,000 
The bank transacts a general banking busi- 
ness, sells drafts, makes telegraphic transfers, 
and issues letters of credit available through- 
out the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys, and sells exchange and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILENTHAL. 

Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., Corner Sutter. 

Assets $5,500,000 

Paid-up ' Capital ' and Reserve 1,750.000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administra- 
tor, Guardian or Trustee. Check accounts 
solicited. Legal depository for money In Pro- 
bate court proceedings. Interest paid on Sav- 
ings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per annum. 



in a daily 

- 

land tic othw dijr, and 
' aquin Mill r 
him if In' were Miller thi 
"I nm somotimi - 

v. 
only - 

,,ii,' who i- acquainted 
with Miller knows. In- would 
rtrni k an attitude and ac- 
knowledged in llh' most enthu- 
rnanner thai he was a poet 
he would have kiss,-d the 
palm of each of them, mid won II 
have uttered Borne bizarre epi- 
gram really worth quoting. 



French American Bank, 






Corner Montgomery «nd Market St*. 

M 

•i Olrerd, a««i 

act (m Truil 

net As- 

uklnc business 



'I'll,' Examiner is not having 
mi altogether easy and pleasant 
time with its Oakland edition. 
There is something (lie matter 
with its press, which lias the 
habit of breaking down occa- 
sionally — especially on Sunday 
mornings. The papers are de- 
livered any old time — although 
it is no more than just to say 
thai thev are always at hand be- 
fore noon — and there is in con- 
sequence much angry muttering 
among the classes that care to 
read the sheet. 



Member Stock 

and Bond Exchange. 

J. C. Wilson 

BROKER 

STOCKS and BONDS. INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 
Telephone Temporary 815 KOHL BUILDING 



I take back what I said last 
week about the Oakland police 
being able to arrest anyone. I 
see that they have caught four 
burglars, the oldest a giant of a 
I ii iv hrelve years old. 



New York — Phone Call 3177 Broad. 

E. F. Hutton & Co., Bankers 

Members New York Stock Exchange, New 
York Coffee Exchange, New York Cotton 
Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade. 
33-35 New St., Branch 547 Fifth 
Ave., NEW YORK. 
PRIVATE WIRE. 
Richard E. Mulcahy, Manager. 
490 California Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
424 Tenth Street. Oakland, Cal. 



Fire Insurance Losses 



Dr. Washington Dodge, 

President 



According to the published ac- 
counts, the greatest commenda- 
tion is clue the two special offi- 
cers who killed one man and 
wounded his brother at the 
butchers' picnic at Shell Mound 
on Sunday. In trying to quell n 
fight the officers were attacked 
by a gang of roughs who as- 
saulted them with chairs and 
beer glasses. As the hoodlums 
closed in on them, the offices 
fired. It was the nroper thing 
to do. For years these Sunday 2295 Franklin Street, 
picnickers have been more thai 
an annoyance to decent people — 
they have been a positive terror, 
with their drunkenness, lewd- 
ness and fighting. They have 
insulted decent women, they have 
captured small country towns 
and almost demolished them, 
meeting with little resistance oa 
account of their numbers, they 
have grown bolder in their ruf- 
fianism. Sunday's shooting may 
have a salutary effect, 



Will soon he paid. If the money is not 
needed for immediate use in rebuilding, 
buying furniture, or replenishing stock.it can 
be profitably invested with the 



Continental Building and Loan Association 

at 5 and 6 per cent interest, the Associa- 
tion, however, reserving the right to limit the 
amount of any individual deposit. 

Offices; Cor. Market and Church Sts. 

OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



William Corbin, 
Sec. and Gen'] Mgr 



J. Barth & Co. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
STOCKS AND BONDS 

INFORMATION ON ALL INVESTMENT 
SECURITIES 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Guaranteed Capita! and Surplus $2,552,719.61 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1 .000,000.00 

Deposits June 30, 1 906 $38,476,520.22 

F. Tillmann, Jr., President; Daniel Meyer, First Vice President; 

Emil Rohte, Second Vice President: A. H. R. Schmidt. Cashier; 

William Herrmann, assl. Cashier; George Tourny, Secretary; A.H, 

Muller, asst. Secretary; W. S. Goodfehow, General Attorney. 

Directors--F. Tillmann, Jr"; Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhart, I. N. Waller, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. 
Kruse. W . S. Goodfellow. 



64 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1906. 



Prosperity is never good eve a 
for good people and pious Oak- 
land is suffering from a surfeit 
at present. Formerly it was not 
the custom in that town to record 
leases, but so many hankv-panky 
bricks have been played that the 
office of the County Recorder is 
now doing a roaring business in 
recording the titles of lessees 
who are profiting by the mis- 
fortunes of their more trusting 
and less cautious neighbors. 



A period of really unaccount- 
able prosperity appears in have 
set in among the members of the 
Oakland dry < lounciL 'Flic ob- 
vious explanation one would 
think, would lie sought in the 
new business born. But old in- 
habitants shake their heads and 
persist in saying unkind and 
scandalous things aboul city 
politics. So far nothing has 
come to light. But if somebody 
could dismiss a Comissioner . 



It was very kind of the Oak- 
land police to forward a sum of 
money for the relief of the 
policemen of San Francisco. All 
the same, it would quiet much 
grossin if the Oakland police force 
would give accurate information 
,is to just how the sum was col- 
lected. 



Our admiration for the good 
manners of the Eastern traveller 
will not be increased by the 
knowledge that numbers of East- 
ern tourists have wilfully mutil- 
ated the statues at Stanford Uni- 
versity. The same people have 
long enjoyed an evil reputation 
for their depredations upon 
buildings ami historical works 
of a I in Europe. The meanes: 
thing of this sort of which we 
have ever heard has been the 
llici't of the mosaics from the 
ruins of the Memorial ( Ihurch. 



A leading daily complained 
the oilier day of the poor pay re- 
ceived by government officials and 
(lien wrote mi elaborate article In 
prove that thev were worth no 
more than they got. 



The aberrations of the Relief 
Committee are now accounted 

for. Forty thousand dollars 
worth of whisky is stored in the 

basement of the Moulder School. 



An independeni oil man snv^ 
that Standard's grip is broken, 
and thai petroleum will drop 10 
to 35 per cent. We'll yet see 
John D. in vaudeville among the 
other has-beens. 



Santa Cruz 

Welcomes all who desire a comfortable and entertaining place 
for themselves or families. 



NEVER A DULL MOMENT 



The Tallac 



Lake Tahoe, Col. 

The numerous small lakes and streams adjacent 
make this resort 

Headquarters for Rod Fishermen 



San Franciscans are especially invited to write fot 
terms for their families. 

M. LAWRENCE &. CO., Tallac. 



Del Monte Offers 

During the reconstruction of San Francisco, 
Hotel Del Monte ofters a welcome shelter 
to those desiring a homelike place 
for rest and recreation. The park- 
like grounds, the golf links, the flowers, the 
many walks and drives were never more at- 
tractive than at present. The entire hotel has 
recently been renovated and improved; with 
steam heat, electric lights, hot and cold water, 
telephone in every room. Why not make this 
attractive resort near San Francisco your per- 
manent home? Special terms for families. Ad- 
dress Geo. P. Snell, Manager, Del Monte, Cal. 

A Permanent, Home. 

S K A G G S 

^HOT SPRINGS, SONOMA COUNTY^* 

Only four and a half hours from San Francisco. As to the desirabili- 
ty of place 1 refer to any truest of the past 1 1 years. Information u\ 
Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St.. or of J. F. MULGREW, 
Skaggs, Cal. 

Klamath Hot Springs 

Klamath Hot Springs is one of the choice places 
in the State for rest, pleasure and comfort. Fish- 
ing is first-class. Rates $2 and $2.50 per day; ap- 
ply for informational the Peck-Judah Co., 414 
Fourteenth St., Oakland; or Edson Bros., Bes- 
wick, Gal. 

Hillside Villa 

Novato, Marin County. 

Good Room and Board One Dollar Per Day. 
Fishing and bathing. Driving, Horse-back rid- 
ing. Six trains daily. Fare 70 cents. Monthly 
tickets, 25 cents Round Trip. Address MRS. 
FARISH, Novato, Marin county. 

LAKE COUNTY 

Trip to Lake County by WM. SPIERS' 
SPRING STAGES, more comfortable than car- 
riages. From San Francisco to Anderson. Har- 
bin Springs, and return. $7. To Adams, Seig- 
lers, Hobcrgs. Howard, Astorg and Glenbrook 
and return, p. Stages leave Calistoga 11:30 
a. m. Sundays excepted. One- half hour for 
lunch at the new Calistoga Hotel. Fifty pounds 
baggage allowed with each ticket. Tickets on 
sale at Southern Pacific Offices. 



Agua Caliente Springs 

&minttia l£minlii. (California. 

Not injured. Better than ever. Rates the same. 

Address 
$. HirburbD. Agua (Ealtrutr. Cal. 

Mrs. Mary Page Sheerin 

AFTERNOON TEAS and BANQUETS 

"The Colonial" 

Strictly First-Class 
Phone Main 661. LOS GATOS, CAL. 

Samuel M. Shortridge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1101 O'Farrell Street, corner Franklin Street, 
San Francisco. 

About Your Trip East 

When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall I go?" 
Let rne offer a suggestion. The Missouri 
Pacific operates both Pullman and Tourisl 
Sleepers through from California to Kansas 
City, St. Louis and Chicago without change 
of cars, which carry you through the world 
famed scenery of Colorado by daylight. 
Dining and cafe cars on all through trains, 
service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and hand- 
somely illustrated books of travel. 



W. J. SHOTWELL, General Agent. 
1070 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAL. 



THE F. THOMAS PARISIAN 
DYEING & GLEANING WORKS 

Cleansing Dainty Garments our Specialty 

Our new monthly contract for gentlemen 
— 1 suit a week cleaned and pressed in- 
cluding small repairs 

$1.50 PER MONTH 

We clean ladies' and gentlemen's auto- 
mobile suits to perfection and return in 
24 hours if brought to 

1158 McAllister Street 

Oakland Office-Broadway-1 164 



\MI\1 S\N IK\MIS< (» || \S Hi s| \KI Willi 




ffihnore street, looking north from Post street. 




Scene looking over west end of Market street. —Br- produced by courtesy of the Overland Monthly, -lime-July Number. 







-'"cvr" . .--„ 



News Better 




VOL. LXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., July 28, 1906 



No. 4 



AM KM 
rial new 

Hcatinn. 

■ 



London ' tffl hill. K 



M 

nd 1121 

■ 



lit l Items, annoum omenta, mining. 

Intended f"r pub- 
In the current number >*f the nkws LETTER should 
to th<- Alameda office not later than Friday morning 



Announcement 

The Business Office of the NEWS LETTER b located at 1121 
Lagima Street, San Francisco. Address all communications 
to the Editorial rooms, 905 Lincoln Avenue, Alameda, tem- 
porary office. Telephone Alameda 1131. 



Because the air in San Francisco is full of dust, 

il is do sign the debris is flying. This is not wit. bul n 
solemn fact. 

Bryan and Hearst should be kept apart when the 

Nfebraskan arrives. Such a concentration of egotism 
might cause the world to tip. 

A man must have led a rapid life when his family 

hesitate to prosecute bis murderer lesl the story of il is 
revealed. So Thaw is pretty safe. 

The booking of life and lire insurance men and 

fellows of that ilk for trans-Atlantic passage is unusually 
large this summer. Wonder why? 

French newspapers are discussing " What would 

you do if you had Rockefeller's wealth?"' That's easy. 
Give it to John D. Ill, the poor lad. 

If airships could utilize hot air or political gas, 

what a splendid supply they could get for the asking at 
the headquarters of "Friends of Ruef." 

If the San Francisco Grand Jury is composed of 

men handy with a gun. and are looking for shining marks 
— well, follow Ruef and they will be found. 

Ben Tillman says it would not be wise to nominate 

htm for second place on the Presidential ticket, and that 
is about the wisest thing Benjamin ever said. 

The meat inspection bill adds 400 political mixers 

and fixers for the good of the party that appointed them. 
Reforms in this country go backward very often. 

Boni has tried three games and lost heavily in 

each— love, cards and politics. Xow let him try to be a 
sensible, well-behaved gentleman and see how it works. 

The Newport bathing suit party is to find a rival 

in a pajama-nightgown dance, so the smart set say. After 
that, a' Garden of Eden apple-eating contest should be 
held. 

A young heir wants to know what he bail besl 

invest $5,000 in. It is enough to start in with at the 
race track, but hardly enough to '-bring out" a chorus 
girl. 

The laugh is on the people of Lincoln, Neb. A 

great wind storm came rushing down on the town the 
other night, and they all rushed to the station to welcome 
Bryan. 



.it forinei i onuiiissioner Reagan 
ol a thorough investic 
concerning tint whisky and French restaurant deal, Mr. 
Mayor Scl i 

Mis. N'eebil Tha« si Id UOt, ;b a matter of ballet 

etiquette, arrange for another husband until Harry is 
either electrocuted or lodged in a mad house. No eharg-; 
for the suggestion. 

'I bus far Roosevelt's administration has been a 

(pensive one, and the indications are that the pcnpl, 
scarcely get their money's woTth, except in remember- 
ing bow like a pyrotechnic display it lias been. 

. Roosevell is nol asked to convene Congress in extra 

in for thai particular purpose, bul if he will have the 
smoke nuisance abated when next he has the nation's 
law-makers on his hands, much will be forgiven. 

Secretary Taffs chances for the nomination will, 

by the grace of Roosevelt, go into the convention with the 
solid South for him. Ii is already fixed thai way. which 
is also sharp politics taking time by its pompadour. 

Dreyfus is now a Major in the crack artillery regi- 
ment Of Prance, bul bis reward will not be complete until 

former War Secretary Mereier is in bis old cage on Devil's 

Island. Turn the rascals out — or rather into prison. 

The Kaiser has become so fond of Mexican coffee 

that he is hankering for a plantation down there that 
would embrace pretty much the whole of the republic. Al- 
ways has an eye out for something, that man William. 
The railroad dead-beat list is being cut oil' at its 

head and feet, and tin' part between will he thrown on 
the scrap pile, but that does not mean that all passes ar° 
out of commission. " For services rendered " will beat 
any anti-pass law. 

Harry Thaw is a Harvard man to the extent that 

in a little time he found that he did not like Harvard, 
and that Harvard did not like Thaw. The faculty did not 
weep, nor did the institution put on mounting when he 
left, so don't, worry. 

-About forty members of the British House of Com- 
mons are newspaper men, and fully two-thirds of them 
are in the harness. Perhaps that is why Parliament never 
misses an " item " that will help England, and is never 
" scooped " by any other nation. 

An Eastern newspaper man boasts that during 

bis university days he never missed a single recitation or 
cut out service in the chapel once. But why should he 
want to parade his youthful indiscretions and acknowledge 
that he missed a lot of good fun? 

And now comes a learned doctor of pills and plas- 
ters, who says you will have it bad if you eat lish thai tire 
I;, ken from the bay, because they arc too fond of sewage 

to be healthy. If these experts keep on we shall have 
to live on a mixture of air and faith. 

It looks very much as il' a big lot of that relief fund 

would be relieved 'of its general character as purchasing 
power for needy refugees, and find safe lodgment in the 
pocket-books of a gang of patriots very much to their in- 
dividual relief. Taking coppers off a dead "man and 
brother." is slow and crude by comparison. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 28, 1906 



THE COUNTRY'S SAVIORS. 

From present indication, and they seem altogether re- 
liable, the Democratic parry may make up its mind that, 
unless Roosevelt goes back on his repeated assertions that 
he will not be a candidate, it will have to measure strength 
with Secretary Taft in the race for President. Within 
the last few days, surprises have come to Cannon, Fair- 
banks, Littlelield and the other waiting souls for Presi- 
dential lightning to strike their rods. And the greatest 
of the surprises is that Roosevelt for Taft. or for himself, 
as tile ease may lie. has already corralled the delegations 
from the Southern Stales to the national convention. 
Ostensibly the delegates from the several Southern States 
will lie pledged to vote Eor Roosevelt, but with a positive 
agreement that lie may throw their vote solidly for whom 
he likes. That Roosevelt is lor Taft against the field, no 
one doubts, but of course if il is found that the majority 
of the convention is hungering and thirsting for more 
of Roosevelt, he will permit the nomination to be " forced" 
unon him if it comes by acclamation. Cannon and Fair- 
banks now fully realize that the hand of every Federal 
office holder is working for Taft in a quiet way. but quiet 
as they may be working, the Taft boom just now overlaps 
and smothers all others. And the fact that lioosevelt is 
the power behind Tail, with the immense patronage of the 
Government, gives ample reason for believing that it is 
the purpose of Roosevelt to control the convention. But 
on the other hand, New York and Ohio are the only north- 
ern States Taft can count on with any certainty, and only 
so because he is an Ohio man and Koosevelt a New York 
man. 1 1 is known positively that New England and 
Pennsylvania are suspicions of Taft on the tariff ques- 
tion, and it is equally certain that the Northwest prefers 
La Fallette. while Illinois and Michigan, anil most likely 
Indiana, will stick to Cannon so long as there is a chance, 
'fhe difficulty in correctly analyzing the situation lies in 
the fact that scheming for position is fully a year, perhaps 
eighteen months, earlier than in former times: neverthe- 
less, il is pretty generally conceded that Taft will continue 
in the lead: that no dark horse is provided lor, and that 
when the convention meets, the final balloting will nomi- 
nate either Taft or lioosevelt, but with conlidentially- 

niade pledges that the present tariff schedule is not to ba 
seriously interfered with. 

The Bryanites, or rather those of the old Cleveland- 
Palmer school, are having cold shudders. Bryan's labor 
union friends are demanding that right QffB il lie agreed 
that President Mitchell of the Tinted Mine Workers shall 
lie Bryan's running male. This, union leaders claim, 
would at once settle the question of how lalior unions 
would vole, which would he. of course, for Bryan and 
Mitchell. On the other hand, many of Bryan's Democratic 
adherents in 1896 and lsnn would repudiate such a tickel 
because if there is one thing a real Democrat fears more 
than another, it is the possibility of the capture of the 
party by organized lalior. for it would mean thai socialism 
had triumphed over .lelfersonianism. and captured its 
machinery and organization. But there is still another 
opposition to such a combination which comes from the 

Delis following, or the so-called Social Del irats, who 

look upon Bryan as a half-baked socialist, or, more prop- 
erly speaking, a weather-cock politician. Anyway, the in- 
jection of Mitchell into the plans of the leaders of the 
party has given Bryan a set-back from which he is not 
likely to recover, the more so because those who are sup- 
posed lo lie close in Lis confidence do not rebuke the in- 
trusion of lalior unionism in its organized form and its 
demand to have its right to nominate the lail end of the 
Democratic ticket fully recognized Iwo years before the 
meeting of the convention. In short, Bryan is not nearly 
as strong as he was ten days ago: besides, it has been 
made very clear that Tammany's indorsement of him was 



a mere play to bring the Bryan and McClelland factions 
hack into harmonious relations with the organization for 
purely state purposes. In 1896 and in 1900, though ap- 
parently supporting Bryan, Tammany knifed him on all 
sides. As a matter of fact, Tammany has never supported 
a man for President, though seemingly so, in whose al- 
legiance to .letfersonian Democracy there was the shallow 
of a doubt. It is or may seem significant that the real 
leaders of the party are grooming no one for the Presiden- 
tial nomination. Hut it means a well-defined purpose lo 
first gel the parly ill harmony with itself upon Jeffer- 
sonian principles, then have the parly formulate its de- 
clarations, after which a man will be found who will lit 
the declarations rather than have them adjusted to suit 
the whims or beliefs of any man. as has been the way 
since 1892. 



THE PROBATION WAY. 
John D. Rockefeller, Christian and philanthropist, now 

in Europe, is Lurrying Lome. His Chicago university is 
going lo the Lad. Professor Zuehlin is teaching the stu- 
dents, and it is a co-ed. school, that the correct solution 
of the matrimonial problem is to he found only in a mar- 
riage contract system that is based on probation. That 
is to say. young people should enter into the marriage re- 
lation exactly as some certain churches receive members 
into their communion, which is, the candidate for mem- 
hersliip is taken on probation lor a given time, hut en- 
joying, meanwhile, all the benefits accruing to full mem- 
bership. If at tl xpiration of the season of probation 

the probationist is still inclined to "stay with it," he is 
declared lo he one of them, lint if he concludes that he 
has had " enough of it," he may withdraw without preju- 
dice to himself, and the transaction stands as it it never 
Lad Loon 'at all. 

According to this particular one of Mr. Rockefeller's 
staff of professors in his eminently Christian institution 
of ethical culture and religious training, the proper caper 
for young people when contemplating matrimony is to 
form a temporary copartnership (limited) for an agreed 
lime. Meanwhile they should study and carefully note 

each other's characteristics, temper, habits and deficiencies. 

At the expiration of the life of the combine, if they are 
satisfied and are willing the one to lake the other into 
full permanent partnership, why, all thai would be re- 
quired would be a marriage license and a preacher. 

But, like the churches thai take members on probation, 

fully ?."i per cent of such connubial contracts would he 
annulled by mutual consent, and other probationary agree- 
ments entered into. I'nlcss Mr. Rockefeller knows Letter 
and can prove his position by observation or otherwise, 
the public will continue to believe that his professor's 
theory of domestic economics would bankrupt every license 
bureau in the land, and cut i he fraternity of preachers 
out of fees that are considered desirable perquisites of the 
cloth. However, there need Le no sleep lost over Professor 
Zueblin's fool notions. His theory Las been in practice 
all down the ages, nor has il ever demonstrated itself 
oilier than to Le vicious, wicked, debasing and tbe prolific 
source of murder, suicide and soul degradation. 



UNPREPARED FOR GRIM WINTER. 
In two months the rainy season will commence. And 
nothing Las been done toward sheltering the tens of thou- 
sands of people wdio are living in tents in San Francisco. 
Plans have been discussed. Lul none of them have met (he 
approval of the powers thai Le. Two months is a short 
lime in which to provide shelter for so many homeless. 
II need not he charity shelter, either, for thousands of the 

refugees are sel l'-sup|ior(ing. and are kept in tents only by 

the faci thai they cannot gel houses. It seems thai the 
$18,000 worth of brains on the Rehabilitation Committee 

should gel to work and plan this practical relief. 






s.w 



I 

II till- llll 

Nurlli anil S 

- 

where m Young in. i 

'lit niul to tin' ilmi.'- 

ni leads in emulation. 

sand and one new Ait 
Toraoi them. 

With ihe fading away .if the jrr.>;ii tire faded man 
firms. 'I: ctimm 

culled -. kept down the young man. The 

set up by the "old established" are burned away and il is 
.if the survival of the tittest and in the blank places 
new and \ iu'<-r..u- growths may be seen. There is young 
blood, Californian and Eastern, coping, side by Bide, with 
the tit nf the old regime. It is good blood and it is the 
iron heart, the clever hand and firm fool of the olden and 
the new that will establish, as on a rock, the belovei 9 
Francisco, the metropolis of the West There is room for 
all and plenty to do and the stranger who comes to work 
will In. made welcome. There is iron in mir lulls t.. melt, 
there is grain to grind in the fields, there is lumber wait- 
ing the saw and the ax, there is gold in the mountains and 
wool on ilif ranges and the stupendous wraith of the rich- 
eat State in the union must have hands to fashion it in 
shape for the use of mankind and the distributing point 
for all these treasures is San Francisco. 



IMPENDING STRIKE. 
Taking advantage of the demand for unskilled labor, 
agitators have been busily engaged for the last two weeks 
in trying to foment trouble for the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road. Heads of the various departments have been ap- 
proached by their employees and the statement laid befors 
them that, owing to the increased cost of living since the 
fire, an advance of wages was imperative. So courteous 
was the treatment accorded these delegations and such 
dee]) interest evinced in the welfare of the men they rep- 
resented that the wind was taken out of the agitators' sails. 
Instead of amalgamation, resulting in the formation of an- 
other A. R. U., with the possibilities of another Debs, 
there is the old order of things for each department, deal- 
ing with its own troubles in its own way. The question is, 
however, will the men be content with the concessions 
granted, or will they take the word of the agitator that 
the demand for increased wages was granted because the 
company was afraid, form a union, make common cause, 
a sweeping demand, and the repetition of the defeat that 
followed the Debs programme in Pullman ? ' 



STARVED BY RED TAPE. 
Allan Pollock and Eudolph Spreckels have made them- 
selves very unpopular with the heads of the relief com- 
mittee by going among the soup kitchens, finding them 
bad, and advocating their abolition. Dr. Devine and the 
other professional charity workers know that personal 
experience doesn't count in such matters. They know 
that a theory is the only thing to work on. Of course, 

the kitchens may he bad, | pie may go hungry — but as 

long as the theory is adhered to, and the system is worked 
out on scientific principles, there should be no kick. Any- 
one should prefer a scientifically empty stomach to one 
filled by unscientific methods. Besides, it is better that 
ninety and nine go hungry than that one undeserving get 
a stomachful. 



1 

i III tile II. 

ii ii motor thai bun 
made In t ! 

mul r- tl d. I he I I 

fim "ii tl dc under the supervision ••) n i, 

- ■ i intend, nt of ] It has , u en- 

Di h automobiles, \ - I of Bixtj 

an hour was maintained for two hours; on the 

return trip miles was generated 

iin.l maintained though! il 

-k their ii. 

It i« the pies, nl intention of the company t" install the 

■shaped car on the suburban tween San 

Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and Alameda, due of the 

chief recommendations for the new ear in Buburban travel 

is the ease with which it can be stopped and the rapidity 

with which it can be started. An incidental recommenda- 
tion lies in the fact that the introduction of the new 

motive power ma) sen,, i., break the ranks of thai aris- 
ol labor, known as the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers. Any capable chauffeur can operate the new 
ear. and do it better than a three hundred dollar a month 
engineer. 



MODEST Ml!. HEARST. 
It is just barely possible that the modest and retiring 

Mr. Hearst at last realizes he is not Ma\ i Greater 

New York. 'I'o persuade him to the belief, Attorney- 
Qeneral Mayer devoted some logic, a tew figures, and a 

great many facts. In denying the suit instituted by 

Hearst against the man who insists on keeping the mayor- 
alty (ban' warm, deBpite the screams of the Anarch of the 
dailies. Mr. Mayer said: "Admitting the claim of fraud 
amounting to 666 votes. Mr. Mct'lellan's plurality is 
3,474." The rest is a matter of simple subtraction. The 
Attorney-General also stated that as eight months bail 

elapsed, enough time was given for the Hearst forces to 
make good their claims that a conspiracy existed between 
the Republican and Democratic watchers to roll him of 
the election. To prove the absurdity of this, he showed 
thai in nineteen out of thirty-five assembly districts, the 
same names appeared as candidates on the Republican 
and Municipal Ownership tickets. Also, that in eight 
out of nineteen assembly districts the nominees of the 

Democratic and Municipal Ownership parties were iden- 
tical. There was a mass of other proof, hut why bother. 
The modest one will have a few more such political roses 
pinned on him before he's done with the game, unless he 
rents a new advisory board. 



The Hearst papers are not devoting much space 

to the failure of the municipal telephone in. Glasgow. 



TO DON ERMINE. 
It never rains but it pours. Judge Melvin, who has 
been elected as Grand Exalted Ruler of the Elks, and 
who is being feted by the order in California, is a candi- 
date for nomination to the Supreme Court. Judge Mel- 
vin is in many ways a remarkable man. He now occupies 
one of Ihe highest positions in the gift of any secret order 
in America, and as Supreme Judge, will have realized one 
of his pet ambitions. He began his career in Oakland as 
a druggist. Tiring of pills and plasters, he was elected 
a justice of the peace. Pardee next appointed him as a 
Superior Judge. The greatest tribute to his worth was 
his unanimous election to the highest position in the 
gift of the Elks. Melvin is a fine raconteur, his banquet 
orations are quoted from the Waldorf-Astoria to the Park 
Hotel, Alameda. He sings well, and his enemies say be 
has sung and orated himself into success, but he has a 
legion of friends who say that his advancement is due to 
fair dealing and squareness to mankind. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1906 



h is very evident that the vast majority of the dele- 
gates to the Republican State convention will be unin- 
structed. Uninstructed, however, does not mean thai 
they go there haphazard, and that there is to be a free 
discussion of eanflidates, and that individual delcgam- 
:i v to lie allowed to vole as they may Hunk best. This is 
not the milleniuni. neither is California a political Utopia. 
It will mean simply that the bosses have not concluded 
whom they will support, Or else that they have not judged 

it opportune to announce their full programme. Fot a 
long time it has been no secret in political circles thai 
neither Walter Xavier Parker, who manages the polities 
of Los Angeles, or Abraham Ruef, who has a good deal 
of potentiality in political affairs in San Francisco. 
wanted the present Governor re-nominated. Pardee has 
committed two unpatdonable sins, from their standpoint. 
lie has made appointments without consulting either of 
them, and he has endeavored to build up a political 
machine of his own. which, had he succeeded, would have 
meant that Charley Spear would have ruled in the seats 
of the mighty, instead of Walter and Abraham. It is 
not hard to understand, therefore, why Pardee is persona 
mm grata with them, and that, if they control the delega- 
tions from San Francisco and Los Angeles, there is no 
hope of his getting the votes of those two cities. .Tusi 
how \ital to the Pardee campaign those votes are. a ven 
brief examination of the voting strength of the various 
counties in the convention will show. 

There will be 82S votes in the convention. Of them. 151 
will come from San Francisco and 129, from Los Angeles. 
There you have 386 votes, or nearly a third of the con- 
vention. But with the big counties go several smaller 
ones: thus. San Bernardino, with its 1G votes, which will 
be rmii rolled by Postmaster Colly of San Bernardino, will 
go with Los Angeles, and San Diego wants an Appellate 
Judge, which she cannot get without the help of Los 
Angeles, so her eighteen votes are to he added to those 
which repose in Mr. Parker's vest pocket. The Hayes 
brothers control Santa Clara County, ami nominally 
" Iliad, Hayes" is a candidate for Governor, but as a 
matter of fact. Santa Clara County is a pari of the Fifth 
Congressional District, and "Red" Hayes wants to go 
hack to Congress. Be can only do that with the help of 
the San Francisco votes from the Fifth District, and if 
"Ruef controls them, he will In' able to dictate to the Hum- 
who, any way, have always looked to him for political in- 
spiration. Santa Clara's thirty-four votes, therefore, may 
be safely placed in the Ruef column. San Mateo, for ob- 
vious reasons, belonging to tin' same Congressional dis- 
trict, and lying between Santa Clara and San Francisco. 
is more than likely to stand with them. Tn other words, 
then. Mr. Parker will have at least 163 votes that lie 
can do as he chooses with at Santa Cruz, and Mi'. Ruef 
will have 200; provided, of course, that Parker and 
Ruef can carry their home counties and cities. Three 
hundred and sixtv-three votes are dangerously near one- 
half of the convention. 

* * * 

Mr. Oillett has, by common consent, the vote of the 
First District, for although Edson thinks he is a candidate 
from Siskiyou, his candidacy is not serious enough to 
hurt, and the Northern county has only eight votes a; 
best. Warren Porter has his home county of Santa Cruz, 
with 11 votes, and the votes of Monterey, 10; San Luis 
Obispo, 8; San Benito, 4: Santa Barbara. 11: and verv 
probably Ventura with eight, though that will depend 
upon former Senator Bard, who, it is reported, looks with 
favor on Gillett's campaign. Porter, therefore, has 4 1 
votes certainly, and possibly 52. while Gilletf can count 
on at least seventy-five. Governor Pardee will have Ala- 
meda, with its seventy-six votes, and Riverside with 11. 



ami Sacramento with :W, and Kern with 9. But there 
is a string upon the Sacramento votes. The countv wants 
Judge Hart placed upon the Appellate Court bench. The 
Harts have for generations been residents of Sacramento, 
have been thoroughly identified with the town, and have 
thousands of personal friends; besides, Hart has alwavs 
programmed, and has been a leading light in the Republi- 
can party: moreover, there is no question but that the 
railroad would like to see him achieve his ambition, whil ■> 
it is not by anv means as enthusiastic for Pardee. Secre- 
tary of State Currv. too, is endorsed by the Sacramento 
delegation, and Curry is far more popular at Sacramento 
than Pardee, so the Governor can not lean too heavily 
upon Sacramento for support; he will get her vote and 
nothing more, as he is only her third choice. The Gov- 
ernor, therefore, has onlv 96 votes which are at all enthu- 
siastic for him. ami with Sacramento only 122. It is 
evident, therefore, that he must have the two big cities to 
win. 

* * * 

As I have said. Huef and Parker are not for the Gov- 
ernor, and yet at the same time they do not appear tn 
be any more enthusiastic for (iillolt or Porter, though 
llarriman has publicly toasted Gilletf as the next Gov- 
ernor of the State. Who, then, are they for? If you ask 
them they will say that they have no candidate, though 
Ruef will probabhj suggest that his friends will vote for 
Haves — "Black" Hayes — but every one understands lien 
the boss has no intention of making the mistake of run- 
ning the whole Hayes family for office, nor of asking the 
labor vote, which is back of him, to support a coal baron. 
In the inner circle, therefore, it is whispered that tic 
candidate who is really to be nominated, if the bosses can 
lane their way, is no one else than former Governor 
Henry T. Gage. It is known that Gage has had several 
interviews with Ruef and Schmifz when the latter visited 
Los Angeles after the election last fall. The Governor 
has been in the city several times since, and while he has 
noi announced his candidacy, he has suggested that his 
friends would ;•_•■{ wisely if they would refrain from pledg- 
ing themselves to any candidate. When I recently asked 
Cage in Los Angeles whether he was a candidate, he said 
he would not make a struggle for the nomination, but 
that he would accept it if offered him. and the bosses did 
not make too many objectionable conditions on his ac- 
ceptation. Rtiefs reason for suggesting Cage is that tin 
former Governor is very popular with the laboring ele- 
ment, because of his refusal to protect the public from 
the attacks of the teamsters at the time of their strike 
several years ago. In other words, he is popular because 
he did nothing, while Phelan is unpopular because he did 
something both with the same element, and should the 
Democrats nominate the former Mayor and the Republi- 
cans the former Governor, the old-time issue would be 



it 



N. 



The Hub 

CHAS. KEILUS & CO. 

Exclusive 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No branch stores — no agents 

Authentic models are shown in this shop as 
soon as they're born. The highest qualities 
made by the foremost clothes makers known- 
Tasteful dressers who know good clothes 
shouldn't overlook us. 

The seal of confidence marks every aaiment in this 
exclusive ihop. We have no sale for clothes thai are 
gotten ud in a hurry. We refuse to sell "Emergency 
clolhes." 

KING SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, Ne*ar Sutter, 

San Francisco. 



^ 



Jf 


















, 

■ I 
. 
mm I" nlil nut nominal 

1 not be pli I ill I hi- |>iwi(iiin of 

lidate fi>r Governor 

tin' Repn 
candidate. To lo the former would ruin him with the 

party, without whose rote he would I"' of no 
ml importance. To do the latter would ruin him with the 
Republicans, and make him an imoossiblc randida 
rnited States S forp a Republican legislature, 

nomination of Gage offers a happy solution to nil 
these problems, and moreover cements the alliance between 
Ruef and the Southern boss, which was consummated 
when the San Francis - his rotes in the legisla- 

ture to elect the candidate '>f the Los Angeles boss to the 
Senate two yean ik'". 

* * * 

The programme, as it is now understood, therefore, is 

to go tn Santa Cruz anoarcntly unpledged, and for a bal- 
lot or two allow Qilletl and Pardee to think that they havfi 
a chance, and then, when the psychic moment arrives, fo 
Bpring the magic name of Gage and Bweep the convention. 
The Republicans this year have a hard fitrht before them, 
and they know that. It is thought that Qa<re is one of the 
few men that can win. Not only do his friends calculate 
that he will get both the solid Republican and the Labor 
vote, but they saj the radical Democrats of the Hearst 
stripe will also support liis candidacy. Here is a com- 
bination that is worse than a Dunlin stew, and if the 
Renuhlicans carry out such a DroSTamme, and hand over 
their partv to such influences, the Democrats should 
not have any trouble in winning with any pood, clean, 
decent candidate for Governor. 



A CHINA LAUNDRY TRUST. 
Housekeepers on the Alameda side of the Bay have been 
puzzled as well as annoyed lately at the manner in which 
their hills for washing have been mounting up at the 
Chinese laundrys. The proprietors said, "Too muehee 
cost," and grew irritable when questioned on the subject, 
practically refusing with natural stolidity to discuss the 
subject. An investigation has developed the fact that 
their ill temper is well grounded, for no white boss domin- 
ated by union rule is more harassed to-day than the un- 
fortunate Ah Sing, One Lung and their numerous 
cousins who run the wash houses. The help is now thor- 
oughly unionized, and under laws similar to the white 
laundry employes, but if anything more stringent and 
more rigidly enforced, enabling them to bully the em- 
ployer in a very effective style. Chinese washermen are 
growing scarcer all the time, and their constant demand 
for an increase in pay keeps the boss on nettles eternally. 
and involved in perpetual strife with the natrons who 
are now paying rates almost on a level with those charged 
bv French -and American laundries. The coolies at the. 
tub and ironing board exact an hour each day for sloop, 
with a recess for tea in the afternoon, with pipes of opium 
flavored tobacco ad libitum. There are these privileges, 
which to refuse means an immediate walkout until the 
boss tumbles himself in the dust before the implacable 
tyrants who absorb his profit to the narrow verge of bank- 
ruptcy and rule him with an iron rod. The case, too, 
is hopeless, and about six months more of existing con- 
ditions will wipe out the few remaining wash houses, 
picturesque reminders of California in the early days. 



mil th.' t\; 

near the •■ >]e. The i 

placed in the basement of the Imi 
- d mum n - and annoyani 

The editorial rooms and die typographical department 
liav,'. therefore, been removed to the now building, where 
they occupy the second and third flon con- 

venience that is known to the science of getting out a 
modern newspaper quickly and with the 

timi. from a mechanical standpoint, has 1 n utilized in 

the new plant. 

Chronicle has always horn known as the most con- 
servative and truly reliable newspaper in the West, and 
n- boast of having "the largest circulation" ha 

no ti 1 n an idle one, for it is well known that it 

wields a stronger influence, covering a wider sphere, than 
any other daily newspaper published in San Franci 

Not the loast element making for greater succec 
the appointment of Mr. Charles De Young, son o 
proprietor, to the business management. For a long time 
Mr. De Young has been actively connected with the vari- 
ous departments, with the view of gaining valuable ex- 
perience in ihr publishing business. Mr. Charles De 
Young is the natural successor of a successful sire, and 
he has inherited the groat ability of his father as r 
newspaper manager. 



Queen Alexandra is far from being a vain woman. 

but she (loos like to have all the "help" about the house 

conic and see her when dressed for great occasions. II 
pleases the servants, which does her good heart a lot of 
good. Lei some of our shoddy folk — but no. not they. 

They might get their finery soiled. 



With a lot of warships escorting the Secretary of 

State in South American waters, and the President doing 
the Gulf of Mexico with a whole squadron, only your 
Middle West Granger will fail to understand why the 
United States needs a large navv. 



Mayor Schmitz is making a rnistake in getting rid 

of his old gang and surrounding himself by respectable 
gentlemen. The comparison will only emphasize the fact 
that he should get rid of his own official self. This is not 
official, but it is true all the same. 



Russell Sage might still have money to burn if 

he could have taken it with him. 



E. C. HELLER, formerly of Heller 8 
Frank now at 1884 Fillmore Street, near 
Bush under the firm name of 

E. C. HELLER S COMPANY, 

Clothiers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 88, 1906 




'Oo? th*L wtllfJaf the devil.str. wilhjw 



-When Dr. Jordan left the realm 
Oi' sciences called physical, 
And took of prophecy the helm, 

The public soon grew quizzical, 
Ami wondered much to hear him talk 
And scr him make an earthquake walk. 

lie knows just where the temblor goes, 
And what it shakes with ravages, 

And all its future course he shows 
To California!! savages. 

Mr says thai San Leandro's shock 

Will give the world another knock. 

And while the worthy doctor tells 
Of woe to him that's visible, 

The crowd replies with cheerful yells 
And inclination risible, 

And Jordan'd rather be in Tophet 

Before he'd be an earthquake prophet. 



won by Emperor William against the German Limited 
Express was "fixed." It is a royal prerogative to win. 
In mind we see the anxious engineer looking out of the 
cab window, his eye on the royal load earned by the royal 
automobile, fearful that he is gaining an inch, ami more 
fearful that he is losing a half dozen inches, thereby mak- 
ing it impossible to have the set-to called a royal contesl 
and won in a royal maimer. The our hit of consolation to 
lie extracted from the information is that the German Em- 
peror's family name is not Coffroth or Tuxedo Eddy, anil 
we are spared the spectacle of royalty betting on a two- 
headed penny. 

With the exoneration of peace officer L. II. Bald- 
win for the killing of William Oslin. the picnic season 
opens auspiciously. It has been the fashion at prole- 
tarian outings of other years for some teamster or hod- 
carrier to put ii chip on his shoulder ami dare the officers 
to knock it oil'. If any one took the dare, there was a 

free-for-all Sght, ami if no one did, there was a free-for- 
all fight. In the genera] mi\-np. the policemen usually 
came oul a trifle mussed. Prom present indications, some 
of the wives of the ollicors have been protesting againsl 
the iloor-mat effeel presented by their worser halves, after 
concluding their day's work. 

The relief committee has actually discovered two 

carloads of supplies which hitherto were missing. The 
committee is getting on. and as soon as Dr. Devine has 
done counting the number of potatoes which an ordinary 
family should consume in a month, there will he a still 
more satisfactory state of- things. After comparing the 
statistics of the doctor with those of several housewives, 
we are driven to the conclusion that he knows more aboul 
potatoes than must other old women. 

With labor strikes for more pay anil shorter hours, 

and with a steady advance in all kinds of building mater- 
ials, San Francisco ought to lie discouraged, bul -he isn't. 
A town that can errin and bear an earthquake anil a Ere 
of such magnitude is not going to retreat before anything 
of human invention. Just keep that in mind, you fellows 
who are taking advantage of the city's misfortunes, and 
meanwhile, yet ready for the day of wrath. It will come, 
sure and certain. 



Six policemen to a boat are needed to keep the 

Sunday night crowds in order. This is not as had as it 
might he. If the local dictator in Oakland would only 
put one guardian of the peace on each car — the San 
Leandro line preferred — ami invest him with plenary 
power, it is possible the species hoodlum, habitat San 
Francisco, might he broughl to a realization of his un- 
wurth. 

Oakland is mi the war-path again with the extinc- 
tion of the slot machines in full view. How many times 
has Oakland abolished slot machines! Again, just what 
politicians want to blackmail the cigar dealers into fur- 
nishing them funds for the coming campaign? Belief in 
the honesty of Oakland politicians is too much even for 
our credulity, sedulously as we have cultivated that quality. 

" Red " Hayes of Santa Clara is sure the Guberna- 
torial plum would fall into his lap i 1 ' Abe Ruef would stand 
pal for him in the convention. We suggest to " Red " 
that if he wants the shifty lioss to stand for anything over- 
night, the only way to make him do it is to crawl up close 
ami make a noise like money. 

Several instructors have tendered their resignation 

from the summer school because of insufficient remunera- 
tion. The ; mil offered them is not stated. But it 

surely must he very small, for two of them at least lost 
everything in the fire, ami do not have proud stomachs 
just at present. 

The Debris Movers' Union is the latest disturbing 

factor in San Francisco's rebuilding, hut as yet no demand 
has been made to deeds to the real estate cleared oil' as 
a bonus for iloing the work. It is an infant combine yet. 
and much should not lie expected of it until it is a few 

« eeks old. 

We are in a position to deny the statement that 

the Chicago packers have petitioned President Roosevelt 
to withdraw the recently appointed meat inspectors ami 

substitute dog-catchers. No doubl the libel resulted IV 

the discovery of that license tag Boating in the embalming 

fluid. 

There are too many able-bodied hut lazy men 

loafing around in the refugee camps. Start them out with 
one day's rations, ami tell them to never conic hack. 
That's (lie way to deal with such fellows. 



SHREVE & 
COMPANY 

HAVE ON SALE 
THEIR USUAL 
COMPLETE STOCK OF 
DIAMOND and COLD 
JEWELRY, WATCHES, 
SILVERWARE, GLASS- 
WARE, STATIONERY, 
ETC., AT 

Post Street and Grant 
Avenue, and 2429 Jackson 
Street San Francisco 

Prompt and careful atten- 
tion given to correspondence 






- 



Ill 

H liana* 1'iiiiifn! duly" 

. hot and 

HeillltV. 

Ah ! w lint t. rr..r -Imll be slm:- 

When the Judge the truth's nndrap 
ping! 

Sow the t ruin jwt"< invocation 
t'nlls the dead to condemnation; 
All receive mi invitation. 

Death and Nature now an' quaking, 

Ami the late lamented, Taking, 

In their breeay shrouds an- shaking. 

Lo! tin- ; • nil- Brining, 

And thi' Clerk, to them referring, 
Make* it awkward for the erring. 

When ilir Judge appears in session. 
Wi' shall all attend confession, 
Loudly preaching nou^nppreesion. 

How shall I then make romances 

Mitigating circumstances? 

E'en tin' just must take thciT chances. 

King whose majesty amazes, 

Save thou him who sings thy praises; 

Fountain, quench my private blazes; 

Pray remember; sacred Savior, 
Mine the playful hand that gave your 
Death-hlow. Pardon .such behavior. 

Seeking me fatigue assailed thee. 
Calv'ry's outlook naught availed thee : 
Now 'twere cruel if I failed thee. 

Righteous judge and learned brother. 
Pray -thy prejudices smother 
E'er we meet to try each other. 

Sighs of guilt my conscience gushes, 
And my face vermilion flushes; 
Spare me for my pretty blushes. 

Thief and harlot, when repenting, 
Thou forgavest — complimenting 
Me with sign of like relenting. 

If too bold is my petition, 

I'll receive with clue submission 

My -dismissal — from perdition. 

When thy sheep thou hast selected 
From thy goats, may I, respected, 
. Stand amongst them undetected. 

When offenders are indicted. 
And with trial-flames ignited, 
Elsewhere I'll attend if cited. 

Ashen-hearted, prone, and prayerful, 
When of death I see the air full. 
Lest I perish, too, be careful. 

On that day of lamentation, 
When, t' enjoy the conflagration, 
Men come forth, 0, be not cruel, 
Spare me, Lord — make them thy fuel ! 

{San Francisco News Letter, June 24, 1876". 



1956 

ml the tire, tin 
••■lil Mm • - .if " | ,,,,,1, 

i luu k retailed th- 

nm! i'\.t again. tic ww one of the Relief > 

"Yep! D iggcd my trunk seven blocks mid then hail 
Stood "iT about a block and seen it burn op 
isp." 

There was another old codger sitting on a soap li<>\. 
meditatively chewing a Btraw. "My wife and me wnr 
stopping in a apartment house, and when the big shake 
came, I ran down the Btairs and she fullered me. M- 
wife's gone neow, bul she were very much in evidence. 
She weighed some three hundred pound. We didn't Mop 
to |'ii t on no clothes, M\ wife «a~ in her shimmie, and 
I didn't have nothing on bul a undershirt My wife, she 
grabbed a comforter offen the bed, and we stood there 
in the street watching the fnlks running np and down 
like mad. I'ri-in soon a man come running along stark 
My wife, ~ln- yells, '0! Shame!' and the man 
In- stopped and looked at hisself. Then he grabbed the 
blanket offen my wife and he run like belli 1 never Beed 
him again. No. never! I looks al my wife, ami 1 says, 

'II! Shame!' and she looks al me and giggles and shakes 
all nver. ami Bays QerVOUS-like, ' Same to you!" And then 

we hiked into the house ami goi some of our duds." 
It was a great day at the Earthquake Veterans- Home. 

The Governor sat on the front |iorel) and reviewed the 

procession. First in line came two grizzled old men — 
Colonel Pippy and Edward Moran. They were still draw- 
ing down the salary of -$(1.111111 a year and the money de- 
rived from the sale of homes to refugees had grown into 
an immense fund. Behind the two veteran commanders 
came, one thousand in number, the "United Relief Fund 
Salary Grabbers." Then came a gorgeous banner in- 
scribed " Pioneers of 1906." None were eligible to this 
order except merchants who had stolen enough out of the 
fund to start in business. Following these came the "Re- 
volving Fund Clerks." This order had now been in 
existence for nearly fifty years, and numbered five thou- 
sand. Now came a noisy mob of children, "Sons of Sons 
of Veterans of the Earthauake." Following these came 
a solitary individual, clad in rags, trudging along sadly 
and bearing aloft a canvass banner on which was inscribed 
the words: "The Relieved." All the rest had died. 
And then I woke up. 



" Russell Sage is dead." The line is a short one- 
it tells the whole story. Silence is sometimes a dubious 
compliment. 

r- — ■ 

lal&iuin 
Pianos 

Their tonal magnificence, combined with the most 
delightful touch, brings expression to every shade of 
tone color, and meets the requirements of the most 
exacting musical critic. 

See our complete stock of GRANDS and UPRIGHTS 

DM Qll nUflW 9 Pfl 2512-14 Sacramento Street, 

. PI, DALUWIn 06UU,, Near Fillmore San Francisco 



IC 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, I90ii 




The Legal Effect of the Earthquake Clause 

The legal effeci of the earthquake clause, as contained 
in the policies of some of the insurance companies, is a 
matter of considerable interest at the present time, and 
all the mure so, as the question lias not arisen hitherto 
in the precise form in which it is now presented. 

The German and English companies have protected 
themselves most largely in this particular, and it is said 
that their policies were designed to meet the risks of busi- 
ness in South America, where the frequency of earth- 
quakes was considered to constitute a risk against which 
the insurance companies were called upon to expressly 
protect themselves.. 

The clause must, of course, be construed' as any other 
contract provision is construed, but the special points in- 
volved in the construction of a clause of this nature arc 
roughly Bpeaking as follows: 

It is generally accepted that the exception contained 
in the standard policy regarding explosion excludes all 
damage directly caused by the explosion, but does not re- 
lieve the insurance company from damage actually don" 
by lire which results from the explosion. (Vance on In- 
surance, p. 480.) 

An important case arising under the exception clause 
with respect to explosion was Louisiana Mutual Insurance 
Company vs. Tweed. 7. Wallace 44. In this case the U. S 
Supreme Courl decided that wdiere an insurance policy 
covering cotton in a warehouse contained the proviso thai 
the company will no! be responsible for loss by fire caused 
•' by means of * * * explosion. - ' and the cotton was de- 
stroyed by fire, caused by an explosion, which set fire to 
a building near the warehouse, and which thus communi- 
cated fire to the warehouse containing the cotton, that 
the fire was caused by the explosion, and that therefore 
the company was not liable. 

Li the same case it was also decided that if a new 
force has intervened between the cause alleged and the 
effect accomplished, sufficient of itself to cause the effect 
the other must be considered as the remote cause of the 
effect, but where there is no such intervening cause, the al- 
leged cause is the proximate cause of the effect. 

The scope of this decision has, however, been consider' 
ably modified by the various State courts which have con- 
Mined it much more strongly against the insurance com- 
panv than the rather sweeping decision above quoted 
would appear to permit. 

Thus, in the ease of Pennsylvania Compan- vs. Whit" 
lock. 50 Am. Rep. page 80. The court regarded the wind 
as such an independent agency and refused to consider 
the accidental burning of a hotel building as a natural. 
immediate, and proximate cause of the burning of a sta- 
tion house which had been fired by the wind driving the 
names from the burning hotel. In commenting upon the 
Tweed case, the court said : " It is true that in the case 
of Ins. Co. vs. Tweed i. Wall 44. the Supreme Court of 
the United States refused to recognize the wind, which 
had carried sparks and flames from one building to an- 
other in that case, as the intervening of a new force or 
power, but that construction was reached as the result 
of a peculiarly worded policy of insurance * * * and 
cannot in consequence be regarded as a precedent of any 
?reat value in a ease like this." 

In Hoffman vs. Insurance Co., 132 Pa. 580, and in 
Heuer vs. Insurance Co., 144 111. 393, the tendency to 



restrict the exception rather than to extend it was mani- 
fest, and Vance commenting on these decisions, says : 
" The construction given to this exception by these courts 
is manifestly more reasonable. It would be outrageous 
to hold that all the property owners who suffered loss in 
the recent Baltimore lire would he deprived of any benefit 
of insurance in case ii should be proved that that dis- 
astrous conflagration had had its origin in some kind of 
explosion. Such a conflagration as the great Chicago 
fire might as easily have originated in a gunpowder ex- 
plosion in the hands of careless boys in a stable as in 
the historic overturning of a lantern. Tn such a case, the 
doctrine in Louisiana Insurance Co. vs. Tweed would 
surety yield." 

Was there any such independent agency intervening be- 
tween the earthquake and the burning dwellings in San 
Francisco as may he considered a proximate cause of such 
burning rather than the earthquake? The whole matter 
turns upon the question as to whether the earthquake was 
the proximate cause of the conflagration. If it can be 
held that it was, then there does not appear to be any 
reason why the earthquake clause should not hold good, 
and why the construction of the insurance policy in that 
respect should not he in favor of the company. 

In so cases it is probable that the effect of the earth- 
quake was tin' immediate ignition of such buildings as 
had been shaken. If the building fell, so as to lose its 
identity, and afterwards caught fire, according to the de- 
cisions, the company is not liable. But there were very 
few buildings in San Francisco whose fall was so complete 
and still fewer whose fall was followed by a fire which 
destroyed them arising from the earthquake alone, with- 
out some intermediate and independent agency. 

There is no doubt that the earthquake shook down a 
great number of chimneys in San Francisco, and that 
many fires resulted from the kindling of fires in these 
defective chimneys. These fires were not kindled owing 
lo the action of the earthquake; neither did the result 
which followed in the shape of the destruction of the 
buildings in which fires were kindled, as well as that of 
other buildings ignited by these burning buildings follow 
from the earthquake. Can it he said that the earthquake 
was the proximate cause of these conflagrations and does 
the earthquake clause preserve the company from liability 
on account of the destruction thus caused to property ? 

If it is held that the kindling of these fires was the 
proximate cause of the subsequent destruction of property, 
how is the earthquake clause going to cover the companies' 
liability? It is clear enough that the earthquake did not 
cause the people who built fires to build them, and it 



McMahon 
Keyer ®> 
Stiegeler 
Bros. 
Inc. 



Van Ness Ave. at Ellis 
O'Farrell Street at Fillmore 




• 



SAN 



II 



wntiM mrthqnaki 

It 1 1 U « .1 ' - 

in tlw «>ni : ' thing* hai 

during Iho ihrw •'■ 
vould certain]) hare had no connection with 

rind of which the earthquake would not hare 
her directly or indirectly. 

With regard to the actual the earthquake upon 

Imildinjjs nnt] th.-ir d without the intermediarv 

action of tin-, il neral rule that "If a building 

or any part thereof fall except n* the result of tire all in- 
■nrance by this policy on such building or it- contents 
shall immediate] This lias !>v the do isiom 

limited, however, to relate merely to the fall of any sub- 
stantial port inn of the building ami the construction ::• n- 
rrallv adopted i«. that the falling of an immaterial part 
of the building, n part which is not functional to the 
building, will not avoid the insurance. 

It has been held, also, thai when a building falls and 
losos its identity as a building, and afterwards catches 
tin\ thai the company is not responsible. 

The history of the disaster shows very plainly that 
neither of the cases just mentioned will play any great 
pan in the controversy with the companies. The earth- 
quake, except in a few well-known instances, did not do 

such damage to buildings as to utterly destroy them or to 
eliminate their identity as buildings. And even where 
tire succeeded, it did not. in many cases, perform its 
work on huitdiivs which had previously been destroyed 
by earthquake shock. 

The main question is. whether the earthquake was the 
proximate cause of the tire. and. as we have seen, there is. 
at least, excellent ground for maintaining that it was not 
so. It certainly was not the immediate cause, that will 
he readily conceded even by the champions of the insur- 
ance companies. The question is. then, whether the inter- 
vening cause was in itself sufficient to cause the effect. Ii' 
so. the earthquake was merely a remote cause. 
* * * 

Those Water Mains. 

The trickery of Quimby and the Eagle Insurance Co. 
having been exposed by the Grand Jury, it only remains 
for us to pay our respects to Quimby. The insurance 
company, is rotten enough in all conscience, but what must 
be said of a lawyer who condescends to the use of manufac- 
tured and fraudulent testimony? It is to be hoped that 
the Bar Association of Mr. Quimby's State will express 
its emphatic opinion on the subjects. We are no hypo- 
critical purists, but there are limits beyond which even 
an attorney cannot step. 

There is a contention on the part of some of the insur- 
ance companies that the breaking of the water mains 
should relieve them of a portion of their liability. This 
would bring the matter on all fours with a notable occur- 
rence during the great Boston fire. That conflagration 
spread because all the horses in Boston were at that time 
afflicted with epizutal, so that they could not pull a load, 
and thus the apparatus was not got out. We heard of no 
argument that the companies were relieved from liability 
because of the ravages of this disease. There is not 
an atom of sense in the contention. . 
* * * 

' An Unsuccessful Innovation. 

Hiring a lawyer as a press agent for a group of default- 
ing insurance companies is likely to prove a costly experi- 
ment. It augurs that the lawyer and the companies have 
something to hide. The public is entitled to all possible 
information, and it is safe to say that the "conversation 
by appointment" attorneys will receive more undesired 
publicity than their contract with these companies calls 
for. 



f 



\m 



Malthoid 
Roofing—-— 

P. & B. Goods 



For temporary or permanent buildings— 
quickly laid by anyone — waterproof, fire 
resisting and a durable roof. Sales de- 
partment in San Francisco at 1306 Post 
Street. Factory uninjured, orders deliv- 
ered immediately. Address 



THE PARAFFINE PAINT CO. 

Main Offi<e — Union Savings Bank 
Building, Oakland. Gal. Tele- 
phone Oakland 7567. 



;s % 



J 



ZADIG&CO 

STOCK BROKERS 

Fortuerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed bunnes* in their 

own building 
324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New 

San Francisco Stock and Exchange Building 



Just One 

newspaper in Oakland that has the Asso" 
ciated Press service, and prints a Sunday 
morning paper. 

The Tribune 



leads in circulation, leads in advertising. 
Special social features. 
Inside political news. 



L. Bloch 

Ladies' Hair Dresser 

Manicuring, Shampooing, Hair Dyeing, and All Kinds of Hair Work 

1 348 Van Ness Avenue, 
Near Bush St., ■ San Francisco 



AN : HANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jdly 28, 190U 




FINANCIAL 




The Comstoek market is still dull, 
Comstoek Market, while prices show little change. 
This is disappointing to friends 
of the lode, who have a firm belief in the future of the 
lode, and who have looked for improved prices as eacli 
new phase of development won on the new basis is in- 
augurated. Prices always in the past assumed a stronger 
tone upon the announcement of each new departure in 
underground exploitation. The latest announcement that 
work was about to be resumed in the old Mexican mine 
is of more than ordinary interest, and naturally dealers 
look for more strength and buoyancy in the stock - . It 
has toned Up a little, certainly, but nothing like what it 
should. It is a long time now since a pick was struck 
in Mexican.. The developments in Ophir have at last re- 
sulted in a movement to follow the ledge now opened in 
the last-named ground into Mexican, where it is consid- 
ered likely it will be found. With this end in view, the 
North-drift on the 2,000 level of Ophir will he extend..! 
into Mexican ground to a connection with the drift on the 
same level now being run south from the Union shaft. 
This is a particularly favorable section of the Comstoek 
lode, and there is a greater possibility that ore will be 
opened up here during the course of explorations than 
anywhere else along its entire line. The North-end mines, 
with Savage and Noreross in the middle group, are now 
the main attractions for investors who recognize that in 
them they are certain to get a run for their money, with 
every chance for a strike which may result in booming 
prices. 

The copper mines of the Funeral 
Furnace Creel- range in Inyo County, within a 
Copper Bonanzas, short distance of the boundary 
line between Nevada and Califor- 
nia, are now attracting the attention of all the great 
dealers in this metal on the American continent, and it 
would not be surprising if some of the properties there 
changed hands within a few weeks, at good round figures. 
A fine quality of ore is there in quantity, and mining 
men acquainted with the district have all along main- 
tained that eventually this region will develop into the 
greatest copper producing camp in the West. The Fur- 
nace Creek mines in this range are largely held by peo- 
ple in this city, who have, as usual, had quite a time 
securing financial assistance to help out the work of de- 
velopment. Now, however, at the eleventh hour, when 
the Guggenheims and Clark have entered the field, there 
will probably be a wild rush for shares, only to find that 
there are none for sale. Months ago, when the first dis- 
coveries were made in .Furnace Creek and along the 
!FuneraJ Eange, the News Letter advised its readers 
among the mining community that these shares were good 
to buy and hold. Those who had the good sense to take 
the tip, will sooner or later realize handsomely upon their 
investment. It is only a matter of time until the bigger 
copper interests, whose representatives are now on the 
field, will absorb all of the properties along the line of 
the lode, and they will not get them for a song. Lige 
Harris, the well known expert, who has spent years on the 
desert, ought to come out of the deal with a large pot of 
money. 

An interesting story comes over 

Reno's Golden Pare, the wires from Reno, about the 

paving of its streets with gold. 

The source of this magnificence is said to be the tailings 



.1 I 'use which 

Wins Sympathy. 



pile of the old English mill, which, the story goes on to 
say, show values by assay of from $5 to $12 per ton. The 
sample that gave this assay must have been selected by a 
wizard, for these assays, ii' they have been sampled once, 
have been passed on fifty times in as many different in- 
terests, and proved valueless. However, it would be a 
shame to spoil a day dream which elevates this ambitious 
little railroad community to the position of Jerusalem the 
Golden. Reno has never yet been noted for the particular 
modesty of its ambitious. At least, so a Carson man 
would lik.lv say if asked for an opinion on the subject. 
Much sympathy is felt throughout 
the local business community for 
the Fireman's Fund Insurance 
Company, an old and reliable 
California institution now beset with difficulties arising 
from iis losses in the recent conflagration. It was hard 
bit financially at the time, and worse still, lost all its books 
and papers, which threw its affairs into an inextricable 
muss, it is now on the eve of winding up its affairs, a 
\rv\- surprising condition for a company so rich and pros- 
perous, and seemingly occupying an absolutely impreg- 
nable position only a few short months ago. An effort 
will doubtless he made to render the unfortunate com- 
pany every assistance in its troubles, anil enable it to real- 
ize on its assets to the best advantage.. Crowding its man- 
agers to the wall at this particular time would mean seri- 
ous loss for all concerned, as it is impossible to rush the 
sale of securities and get the best returns. By careful 
management, il is hoped to raise enough money to pay its 
creditors 60 cent,s on the dollar, a very fail' settlement, all 
things considered. One thing, in the case of the Fire- 
man's Fund, its creditors can depend upon, is fair dealing, 
and that everything will be done to serve their interests 
and cut their losses down. 

The New Nevada share list 
New Nevada Mines, shows little change for the week 
now closed. Tonopah stocks 
have toned up a little, hut there is still room for improve- 
ment in other lines. Stories continue to come in from 
these camps which might be classed as highly sensational, 
were it not (hat the gentlemen who send them are so 
widely known as authorities on everything pertaining to 
mining, and for their unimpeachable veracity. A tale of 
some wonderful strike in a desert mine differs from the 
ordinary fish story in this, that any one engaged in the or- 
dinary walks of life can successfully question the one. 
lacking (he technical education necessary to discuss the 
other. Landing a 300-pound shark with a trout: pole 
may be safely ridiculed, but who shall impugn (he asser- 



e.. 



P. E. BOWLES 



E. W. WILSON 
Vira-Pre.. 



^ 



AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 



DEPOSIT GROWTH 



Mar. 3, 


'02 


$ 387,728.70 


Sept. 15 


'.' 


1,374,983.43 


Mar. 15, 


•03 


2,232,582.94 


Sept. 15, 


" 


2,629,113.39 


Mar.15, 


04 


3,586,912.31 


Sept. 15, 


" 


3,825,471.71 


Mar. 15, 


'05 


4,349,427.92 


Sept. 15, 


" 


4,938,629.05 


Mar. 15. 


'06 


5,998,431.52 


June 18 


" 


6,650,555.88 



V 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BUILDING 

Francis Cutting, Geo. N. O'Brien 

Vice-President Cashier 






SAN K U A ' 









•• al«o are Ix-ard f 

•. 

:. 

- 

■and i>n paper, and f the 

■ill construi 
ami relieve Irn 

pattern in nac with our grandfathers. When the fm 
for travel and transportation are provided, and *l 
■ f building the 
la will advance to the position htfully 

entitled to till in the ranks of Statehood. 



11/77/ THE BOHEMIANS. 
Perham Nahl, the artist, who lost nil li>' bad 
father's magnificent collection of pictures, leaves for an 

of two years at Paris, this week. He » 
go to Germany. He lias secured a commission from a v « 

York - magazine. 

* * * 

Amedee Joullin, now on his way to Paris, 
every large painting bul one. and thai mt brated 

•■ Last Stand." The picture represented a dead pioneer 

ami a live Indian. The pioneer had killed a score, ami 

then was finished off by the savages while using his horse 
as a bulwark tor bullets. This picture was stored some 

time ago with the Oakland Lodge of Elks, and was much 

admired by visitors to the lodge room. After the lire. 
Joullin asked the Klks to raffle it for him. giving him 
the proceeds. The picture broughl $500, on which 
Joullin hopes to make a fresh start. 

* * * 

One would think that of all people artists would have 
been the most helpless after the lire. Of all the artists 

with whom I am acquainted, there is not one whose posi- 
tion as a matter of fact has imt been to some extent bene- 
fited. It is true that they have lost things, hut the extra 
energy which they have been called upon to display has 
more than made up for their losses. Thus. Martinez has 
purchased a lot, is going to build a house, and has bought 
clothes unlimited. All by work done since the fire. Ras- 
ehen says that he never did as well in his life before as 
he is doing now. Some have gone South and started art 
schools; others have set to work picture making in earnest. 
and are actually accomplishing something at last. The 
lire broke up the little " Bohemian " coteries, and this has! 
on the whole, been a splendid thing for the artists. 

An effort is being made by Los Angeles to capture the 

artistic colony, flreenhaum has established himself in 

that place, and it is understood that Wilson intends to 

depart thither also. The latter distinguished himself in 

the disturbance, and was of great assistance to several 

of his -friends. He is full of earthquake stories and can 

tell them extraordinarily well. 
' * * * 

The marriage of Miss Strunsky and William Eng- 
lish Willing, a young and wealthy Chicagoan, should he 
good news to the literary and intellectual set wherever 
they may make their home. There is -little question that 
they will have one of the most delightful places in 
the world and one of the most charming of hostesses. 
We hear, however, that they are still the stormy petrels 
of the Russian Revolution. 



\A MENACE TO STEAMERS. 
Not until some serious wreck lakes. place will any effort 
be made to stop the transportation of logs along the coast 
in big rafts, .One arrived last week, hut the raft that 
preceded it went to pieces, and huge logs arc drifting all 
along the coast, a menace to navigation. 



Pearline 



MfHaJlothef 
VU-t. K.hoc, 



ACTIVE SUMMER EXEIc 

mpam hriftem wmIwib of nuuv fuwiu — l>mi'l Wf*t 1 
thfwi on! bvantiucltvv ruMMne with np *nj w*H-bo*rd. 

PEARLINE 

dopi mm iKm «*pc«<i»-WiTl JOL T RUBBING. 
| Thai'* why ihr mot* default wa*h Uhnc* Usl twice J 

;ittUf whea 



I jearline Does the Washing 



.1 MATTER OF CUSTOM. 
Coming hack to vour old habits is coming hack to 

Swain's Bakery. RcmembeT the number, nil Posl 

street, and the Swain habit for breakfast, luncheon 

and dinner will return to you as a mallei- of course. The 

polite attention, the delightful service, and the attributes 

thai made tl Id place famous are all in force. 



RUEFIANI8M. 

When the final moment arrived, the people of San 
Francisco, who are decently inclined, were "cul out" of 
registration by the Boss Buckley tactics of the adherents 
id' liuef. those failing to get their names on the register 
say the place was packed by the boss, and ruffianism has 
undergone a change, It is now spelled riielianisin. 



By putting "Doe." Leahy on the new Board of 

Police Commissioners, his honor the Mayor has done some- 
thing towards securing a production for that opera he 
intends to Write when he retires from the strenuous life of 
failing to answer specific accusations. The title of the 
opera, it is said, will he "A False Roof, or Where is the 
Leak." One of the features will he a solo by a tall person 
in dark whiskers, while holding his tongue with both 
hands. 




% st^ap of ^uttUoom 

Haberdashers 

for 

Gentlemen 

Hyman CS, Lipman 

1449 FILLMORE STREET 
VAN NESS AVE. near BUSH STREET^ '" ' 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 190(i 



IS® Rfeisfosir ©If F@iT(gngini AiMr® 

Pan-American Congress. 

The most important of the several international current 
events is, in an indirect way, at least, the Pan-American 
Congress, now in session at Rio de Janeiro. True, only 
the Latin-American and the United States are parties in 
interest, but what is expected to be accomplished will no 
doubt have a far-reaching influence, which may directly 
involve the commerce of all nations. It will be remem- 
bered that the late Senator Blaine inaugurated the move- 
ment, and two Congresses held sessions during his life 
time, but no substantial results accrued other than im- 
pressing upon the Latin States that their commercial and 
financial interests were naturally interwoven with those 
of the United States, rather than with the nations of 
Europe. The previous congresses were, therefore, educa- 
tional, but the third, which is now in session, is expected 
to accomplish a great deal on the principle, which is now 
accepted by the southern republics, that there is a degree 
nt' interdependence of the States of the western hemi- 
sphere below the Canadian border which can no longer be 
ignored with prudence. Necessarily, the main question is 
that of commerce, but there are political interests as well 
that should be safeguarded. Perhaps it is not generally 
known how firm a hold Europe, especially Great Britain, 
has upon South America, through commercial bills and 
transportation. Practically all American goods and wares 
sold in the Latin States, as well as those purchased there. 
have to be settled for by English bills of exchange. That 
is to sav, the finances of both the nation and the merchants 
of South America are largely controlled in Liverpool or 
London. This exerts an influence in the politics and in 
the commerce of the Latin republics that would not be 
so easy to measure. But that is not all. If one wants to 
go to a South American port from New York or other At- 
lantic coast points, and wants speed and good accommoda- 
tions, he must go via Liverpool, and travel the same two 
sides of a triangle on returning. And the same is true 
nt commercial commodities, with the exception of perish- 
able ground products that are carried in freight steamers, 
and hides and the like that can wait the slow speed of sail- 
ing craft. To readjust all this upon a basis that will make 
New York, Boston and Philadelphia the London and the 
Liverpool of the Latin States is the chief work of the 
Pan-American congress. But not wholly incidental to 
all this is the Monroe Doctrine, which is the savior, pro- 
tector and defender of the independence of the several 
South American republics. Hitherto the Monroe Doc- 
trine has been enforced quite as much. mure, rather, in 
the interest and for the protection of the United States 
as for the Latin States. Until now this country could not 
afford to have European monarchies acquire any South 
American territory, for they would be a constant menace 
to our institutions, but now this nation is not only a world 
power, but the recognized head of the family of nations. 
However, the Monroe Doctrine is quite as necessary to this 
country as ever before, but from an altogether different 
view point. Now it is necessary Eor the United States 
that the Latin States be protected in their national or- 
ganization and political independence, so that their trade 
and commerce may be free to come to this country, all 
things being equal, which they would not be free to do if 
they were dependencies or colonies of European nations. 
To discuss and to have a clearer understanding of the 
new purpose and objects of the Monroe Doctrine is another 
dutv of the Rio de Janeiro convention. The importance 
of the questions with which the congress has to deal should 
lie apparent to every business man and student of the 
science of Government. 

* * * 

. I mhitious Scotch men. 

The demand of the Scottish members of the House of 



Commons for the establishment of a Parliament for Scot- 
land is not taken very seriously in or out of the land of 
Lowland and Highland clans. No doubt it all comes from 
a misinterpretation of King Edward's speech on the occa- 
sion of the opening of Parliament, where he referred to the 
situation in Ireland. As a matter of fact, the people of 
Scotland would oppose such a measure for two reasons. 
It would revive the old clannish strifes and create sec- 
tional ill-feeling until the best good of the country would 
be sacrificed on the altar of political struggles. The same 
is true of Ireland. The masses have never demanded home 
rule in the sense that the agitation would indicate. 
Greater opportunity to become land-owners, and greatly 
reduced rents, with the eviction laws radically changed for 
the better, is all that the people have ever asked for, and 
they are now getting them in a more satisfactory way than 
hitherto. It is the cities, not the rural districts of Ire- 
land, that make political agitation possible. 
* * * 

The Dead Douma. 

The situation in Russia is exactly what the News Letter 
predicted it would lie when the socialists got control of the 
douma. The douma forced the Czar to accept one of the 
two horns of a dilemma which the socialistic majority 
created — either dissolve Parliament and risk a revolution 
nr surrender to it and obey its orders. He has chosen the 
former, and the wording of the edict of dissolution sets 
the nation back into the old bureau system, thus not only 
annulling the ukase establishing a Parliament, but annull- 
ing all the legislation it has enacted. Very true, the Em- 
peror announces that he will make another attempt to es- 
tablish a Parliament next year, but of course that will de- 
pend upon circumstances. All right-thinking people will 
endorse the Czar in dissolving Parliament, for while it 
had fallen into socialistic hands and its whole aim was 
in use its machinery to inaugurate a revolution, it had not 
succeeded in doing little more than the initial work. No 
doubt the Emperor thought it wise to withdraw all legis- 
lative authority from the radicals so that they might be 
handled as criminals if they persisted in sowing seeds of 
discord. The Government now has the whip-hand if the 
army and navy are loyal, but a revolution is inevitable, 
anyway, only that it will be weaker because it has no 
douma to give it an aspect other than that of lawlessness. 
The scheme of the Czar is a good one to kill out socialism 
and anarchy, but. it remains to be seen if he can keep his 
head on his shoulders long enough to make it effective. 
II is (bat at the next election for members of Parliament 
(iie light to vote will be not wholly, but largely, restricted 
to the peasantry or small farmers and land renters. If 
he can hold on until his plan becomes operative, he will 
have accomplished a mighty work for law and order, for 
in all lands the agrarians are uncompromising foes of 
anarchism. To use the rural rather than the urban popu- 
lation to establish a constitutional Government is a 
wise course, hut can the Czar crush uprisinffs meanwhile? 
All depends upon his ability to do that. If De Witte is 
recalled and eiven extraordinary powers, the Government's 
hands would be "reatly strengthened. He is known to be 
a Constitutional Democrat and a hater of everything that 
smacks of socialism, and he would hang all anarchists. 



ENNEIN'S 



BORATED 
TALCUM 




fi0WDE 



PRICKLY HEAT, r~%~ 
CHAFING, iod ™='- y 
SUNBURN, "VlrSr 

Rcmoici «ll odor of ptrtpirtnon. De- 
lightful if'" Shivlnj. Sold everywhere or 
■Mled on receipt ol 25c Cei Mtnncn't lihe original) StmpU Ft*. 

GCNHARD ntwI.N COMPANY. N«.»rh.N J 



I 









PLEASURE 
WAND 




If+rm, mm* A^ghtmW 



THB KISI> at /7..1) / gyJOi MOST." 

B\ Hl.Wl lit U\ 

"The kind of |>lav I eqjoj moat," variec tritl 
wind*. I would do) venture tn uswer tin ql 
ouslv at tins time because one is nol supposed to have 
serious or thoughts in the summer. Everything 

that savors of the farm commands my attention and 
admiration now. My Hudson river farm is my real 
my world. Ms scenery there is made up of " the lulls. 
rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun: the vales that - 

in pensive quietude between; the venerable w Is" — the 

Hudson that moves "in majesty," "the complaining 
brooks that make the meadows green." Is m>t the Betting 
worth while? 

If I hail an opportunity of being "one of the audience," 
1 should choose, just now, a play that would ever remind 
me of nature. One who is concerned, as I am, with the 
problems of the soil — that cause pleasure in solving, nol 
grief — could not be expected to seek the unhappy prob- 
lems, forced an our attention by dramatists. No, nol in 
the glorious Bummer. Winter is the time to think seri- 
ously. Rut in summer — 

"Cool shades anil dews are "round my way 

And silence of the early day: 

'Mid the dark rocks that watch his bed, 

(ilitters the mighty Hudson spread. 

Uplifted save by drops that fall 

From shrubs thai fringe his mountain wall: 

And o'er the clear, still water swells 

The music of the Sabbath bells." 



By David Warfield. 

If I were "one of the audience " and could choose my 
own theatrical menu, I should select anv form of the 
drama worthy of study. The law student seeks his 
law lectures; the artist attends the best art exhibits, and 
goes far to see a newly found Velasquez — he is ever eager 
to compare a new worth}' American canvas with an estab- 
lished European school : the socialist studies economic 
conditions in every phase ; the novelist is constantly read- 
ing and reviewing past and contemporaneous literature ; 
the musician attends for pleasure and study the important 
recitals, and listens, expectantly and enthralled, to great 
conductors' various readings of the symphonies. The 
actor is as eager to study his art by practical observation 
as any thoughtful student who is anxious to attain greater 
heights. We are all students — lawyer, economist, physi- 
cian, scientist, artist, musician, actor. We never have 
graduated. 

With the actor, the school of life, whose duties must 
be performed every hour, whose lessons are never learned, 
is as important as the technical teachings of past master^ 
of stage craft. Yes, its own lessons cover a wider range 
than even the stage can reflect. Tragedy, romantic drama, 
melodrama, naturalistic drama, comedy and some farce, 
all mirror life in its essential phases, and none of these 
is to be chosen for study to the exclusion of the other. 
Therefore I cannot answer your question specifically. I 
would attend the theatre mostly for study and observa- 
tion; all form of classic and standard drama presents 
this opportunity. The question of study covers also I he 
one of pleasure'; because in theatre-going diversion ensues 
only when the mind is stimulated — new thoughts in- 



well-p 
work* 11* iit' 

thing mile 



i OB 



1/ mi: ORPHBI m 

Th. Marco tv*m«. known all over tin- vaudeville ■ 
a» ■• th. long and the ihorl "f it." will In- seen at the Or- 
pheuiu this Sunday afternoon. Tin- famous Basque ijune 
i, it.-, whose sweel dinging charmed Orpheum aud 
some three years ago, are now on then- second visit i" 
America, and will undoubted!) receive a warm welcome. 
Tin- three llirkinan brothers, singing, dancing and talking 
comedians, will make their lirst appearance in San Fran- 
and from all reports, will spring into immediate 
favor. Ida O'Day, a dainty little mite of femininitt and 
an accomplished singing comedienne and banjoist, will 
offer the specialty that has earned her fame all over Eng- 
land and America. Kellv ami Kent, will van their amus- 
ing act: McWatters, Tyson ami company will introduce 
new specialties in then musical comedy, "Vaudeville,'' 
and Paul Spaduni. the lighl and heavy juggler, will con- 
tinue to astound his audiences. The Camille Comedy 
Trm. in their break-neck ami hilariously runny triple 
horizontal liar entertainment, and Orpheum Motion Pic- 
tures, showing the latesl novelties, will complete an un- 
usually strong programme. 



"It is the poor, that oppress the poor," declared 

a woman to me the other day. She said: " I have jusl 
managed to escape. 1 have had to boiTOW the very 
clothes 1 wear. I should have .saved my valuables if it 
had not been for the greed of a teamster. I offered him 
twenty-five dollars, all I had. lo haul my stuff, lie re- 
fused me because 1 had nut fifty dollars." And it is only 
a very few years since these teamsters were making the 
city ring with their cries for sympathy because of their 
alleged "wrongs." 



The Sailors' Union is amazed to see ships going 

and coming without its help or consent. But it will be 
still more startled one of these days. 



r 



^SPORTING GOODS; 



Vs 



for Summer Outings 

Tennis Rackets, Baseball Goods 
Fishing Tackle and Shotguns 

There's everything you need at 

Brittam & Co., Inc. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
VAN NESS AVE. and TURK ST. 



^ 



J 



Orph 



. ,,—- 1 FORMERLY CHUTES 
.CLim THEATRE 



Week Commencing Sunday Matinee, July 29. 
Matinees every day except Monday. 

"CLASS A" VAUDEVILLE! 

MARCO TWINS; Basque Quartet; Three Hickman Brothers; Ida O'Day; Mc- 
Walters, Tyson & Company; Camille Comedy Trio; Kelly and Kent; Orpheum 
Motion Pictures and last week of PAUL SPADONI. 

Everting Prices: 10, 25 and 50 cents. Matinees, except Saturday and Sunday, 10 
and 25 cents. 

Down Town Box Office at Donlon's Drug Store, Fillmore and Sutter Streets. Phone, 
West 6000. 

CHUTES and ZOO— Open daily from 10 a. m. to midnight: admission 10c; chil- 
dren, 5c 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1906 



iWKER OH 




«j rw i ' i *ir i i,i ! i. ' 



■ ■'■ ■: ■ *-*% 



Interesting as (lie Schmitz-Reagan row is to most 

of us, it should be more annoying than interesting to ex- 
Commissioner llutton, who can hardly like those amorous 
stories of the long ago to be aired in public. There 
ought to he a statute of limitations in sueh matters, if 
only for the sake of public decency. 

I hea nl a good story of one of our better-known local 
artists and his earthquake experience. His description 
is somewhat as follows: " 1 was just undressing to go to 
lied when the shake occurred. My first impression was 
that I had been having a better time than I thought I 
had. Then the chimney fell on my bed, so I knew that it 
was nut my fault." Then alter a pause he concluded with 
much feeling: " lint, my God, just think if I had been 

virtuous !" 

* * * 

Mrs. Constance Lawrence Dean has undoubtedly given 

the lies! accounl of the conditions in the refugee camps 

yet written. Her showing of the incompetency displayed 

is beyond doubt. That a young woman should have been 

allowed to remain in a camp without bedding is the 

gravest indictment which could be drawn againt the pres- 

eni management. Talk about "scientific charity!" It 

seems to be the arch fraud of the century. Any set of 

people with ordinary common sense could do better. These 

theory-ridden charity people are absurd. 
, # * * 

Andrew Funiseth. protesting against the Mexican sail- 
ors on board the Curacoa, writes: "Only four of these men 
have any knowledge of the sea. and neither nl' them have 
ai"' knowledge of the English language." Evidently they 
are in the Furuseth class, as regards the latter objec- 
tion. 

Something new in the way of burglars has been discov- 
erod — a Chinese sa I'e-eraeker. Ifs the exception proving 
the ruli 1 that Chinese are more honest than whites. 

The discomfort of traveling San Francisco's down- 
town streets is becoming almost unbearable, and there 
iloesn'l seem to he unv prospect of an immediate better- 
men! of conditions. Even when' sidewalks remain, thev 
are piled high with debris. When this is gone, building 
material will take its place. So for a long time to com.' 
pedestrians will have to walk in the street, which, with 
more traffic than before the five, is a somewhat danger- 
ous undertaking. And to add to all this discomfort, the 
«inil comes and blows the dust in stifling clouds. It's 

enough to discourage any one but San Franciscans. 

* * * 

In the suit that the Hammond Lumber Company 
brought to enjoin the sailors' and (tremens' unions were 
affidavits setting forth a long and sickening account if 
assaults committed since the strike began. The news 
came out through these affidavits — that is. in some of the 
papers. The Examiner failed to print it. merely saying 
thai affidavits have been filed. 

The influence of civilization on the Oriental mind is 
becoming very manifest. Oakland has developed a gang 
of Chinese footpads. So far their depredations have been 
confined to members of their own race, hut there is little 
doubt that they will soon enter into competition with the 
superior Caucasian. 



A fine commentary upon the talk of the demagogue is 
furnished by the condition of things on the water front. 
Not long ago the Government which placed extra police 
on the water front in time of strike was denounced and 
thrown out. Its successors, when face to face with the 
same problem, act in the same way. They could not do 
otherwise. It only shows the folly of people who be- 
lieved their assertions to the contrary. 

* * * 

Here is a joke that should really go the rounds of the 
world as an example of the eminent sagacity of a richly- 
paid relief committee under expert direction. A few 
poor women at the Old Ladies' Home are in need of a Ut- 
ile wine and brandy. There is a sufficiency of these ar- 
ticles in the hands of the committee, but with all their 
combined wisdom (he members of the committee do not 
know how to get it to the old ladies, who go to bed miser- 
able for the want of a little cordial. Bumble and the 

circumlocution office c bined could not have compassed 

so exquisite a situation. Let the world know what we 
can accomplish under the leadership of special experts 

from Washington. 

* * * 

Another shriek because of the so-called extortion of 
the lumber companies! What do people suppose? Is it 
to be imagined that the lumber people are in the business 
lor fun. and (bat they will not. transact business like busi- 
ness people? 'flic sooner this puerile whining ceases the 
better. The only place for philanthropy is the relief 
camp, and goodness knows the extortion of the business 
men is like the bowels of compassion compared with the 

sort of philanthropy dispTaye'd by the relief committee. 

* * * 

These are hard days for the lawyer who expects to de- 
rive an income from fees contingent upon the payment of 

claims by the six-bit companies. 

* * * 

We have hail grand juries and grand juries, and. truth 
lo tell, are not enamored of the animals. But of all the 
grand juries we have ever had. this is emphatically the 
cheekiest, and does the rawest work. For the secretary 
of the grand jury to be peddling whisky to the tenderloin 
on behalf of the legal adviser of the city Government is 

the most magnificent piece of sheer impudence which we 
have yet shown. We do nothing by halves, and our graft 
is simply superb. 

* * * 

Miss Marion Sterling, whose engagement to young 
Ounha. of Honolulu, is said to have provoked (he opposition 
of her uncle, Frank Havens, is one of the most beautiful 



CHAS.MEINECKE 1 
& COMPANY 

Importers 



Temporary Offices: 

1003 1-2 BROADWAY ROOM 15 

OAKLAND 































8 




iniiiii «n< 








■ 








i: 



her III 

u|i Iht mind she will 

lividual i« likcli 

* • • 

nee in human ■ 

In ii letter \<\ the national Government hi ist foi 

the most part the promotcn of the Brazilian diamond 

ami frauds, who base their claims on tin 

if wurilili ■-- property, miles awaj fmm where 

anything lik<- a diani 1 was ever found. This i- heart- 

remling. If the gentleman would only give us a hint as 
tn the reliable concerns, we might be able to trade in u 
little oil, mining and robber plantation sto,-k for which 
we hare very little furu'n 

» » » 

I '.in Cupid is an enemy of the co-ed. Statistics com- 
piled by officials of the Chicago University show that out 
of 1060 girls graduated from thai seal of learning Bin •■ 
iblishment in 1893, only 171 have married. Thio- 
ls almost in per cent of the total. 

Nil explanation i> offered by the learned profi 
though the girls themselves have a theory. They state 
that the university places such one on its female 

undergraduates thai the incentive to marry is reduced to 

the ratio of tl pportunity. Both the professors with 

their silence, and the girls with theory, may be right. 
Privately we hold the opinion that the average marrying 
man is more than half afraid of the finished female 
scholar. He thinks that she might finish him if he. sug- 
gested an early breakfast, so he could get to the office on 
time. 

* * * 

Insurance against burglars and sneak thieves is a thing 
of the past iii Xew York, owing to the increase of those 
who follow these professions. 

It is proposed to experiment with underwriting the bur- 
glar business. An attempt will be made to bring the sec- 
ond story men into something like formal organization, as 
this is considered one of the most flourishing branches. 
The promoters of the enterprise are confident there will 
he money in it. 

The commission appointed by the Royal Irish Ex- 
position, to he held in Dublin in 1909, is anxious for a 
suitable exhibit from San Francisco . We nominate Abra- 
ham Ruef, not because he would be excruciatingly suitable, 
but because we can spare him. 

* * * 

From Panama comes the story that sanitation and 
sterilization, those bulwarks of Anglo-Saxon civilization, 
are the direct cause of pneumonia and other throat and 
lung troubles among the Jamaica negroes digging the 
Roosevelt ditch. It is also hard for the Canal Commission 
to get the canal builders to eat the carefullv-cooked food. 
As a result, negro labor will be abandoned, and natives 
of Spain induced to locate on the neck of the continent. 
Before calling in the proud hidalgo, we would suggest 
that the officials be supplied with well-filled chicken coops. 
If this treatment is not found effective, we could spare 
a few gallons of Contra Costa water, such as they supply 
in Alameda, or, better still, the Commission, by right of 
eminent domain, could take possession of the person of 
Mary Baker Eddy. This lady's thought waves are the 
best-known substitutes for good health with which we are 
acquainted. 



Pears' 

Don't simply 
u ge\ a cakeof soap." 
< ret good soap. Ask 
for Pears' and you 
have pure soap. 
Then bathing will 
mean more than 
mere cleanliness; it 
will be luxury at 
trifling cost. 

Sales increasing since 1789. 



That intense silence prevailing space is public clamor 

over William Randolph Hearst's threat to withdraw from 
the Presidential race. 



REMOVAL OF TELEPHONE EXCHANGE. 

I lie down-town section of the city will benefit vastly 
by the occupancy of two floors in the Shreve building by 
the Pacific Stales Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
This is to be the executive headquarters of the company. 

The change which will result from the rebuilding of 
the burned district can only lie determined when the re- 
building is fairly under way. and, meanwhile, it is practi- 
cally impossible to decide where the telephonic center of 
the city will be, or to select a site which will permanently 
meet the needs of the company. As it will take at least 
two years for the company to erect its permanent office 
building, and as the Shreve building will be ready for 
occupancy within six months, it has seemed wise to secure 
adequate quarters which will be speedily available in 
a location which is now convenient for the public. 

The 250 employees who are now accommodated in 
the wooilen building on Scott, street, will also be much more 
conveniently located in the Shreve building. At the pres- 
ent time, the Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph 
Company has in San Francisco live telephone buildings 
under construction or reconstruction for the housing of 
its switchboards and exchange apparatus, and three ad- 
ditional exchange buildings will be erected within the 
next two or three years. The exchange buildings are. 
especially constructed for telephone purposes, and the 
company will give these buildings the preference over the 
new office building. 



POPU1AE1TY 1NCBEAS1NO: 

Mr. F. B. (ialindo is a past, master in the art of pleas- 
ing patrons, and the Vienna Bakery and Cafe, 1226 Post 
street, is (he proof of the pudding. The place is the Mecca 
of the shoppers and the business man's luncheon place. 
The Vienna Bakery and Cafe is a comfort to all, and the 
clientage is the best in the city. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



Jul? 28, 190<; 



By Daniel O'Connell. 
We were sitting over our black coffee after a comfort- 
able French dinner, and talking about many things of 11"' 
past, of the present, and of what we expected the future 
would bring us. My friend was a must pleasing young 
man. handsome, well bred, but chronically impecunious. 
Mi- bad practiced law with poor success, for he bad no 
taste for the profession, because, as he informed me with 
tears in his eves, a few months after his admission to 
the Bar. he made the discovery that bis vocation was 
medicine, and thai lie would have made an excellenl 
surgeon. 

"[ have no future before me." he said, sadly, "and I 
have no luck. Unless 1 win a prize in the lottery, I do 
mil see what will become of me." 

"Ab. that is a poor outlook." 1 said. 

"Not as poor as you imagine," lie replied witb anima- 
tion. "I have devised a scheme for beating the lottery. 
I am sure to succeed. Xow this is the first of June. 
Dine with me on the twenty-fifth of December. I shall 
be heeled by that time. 1 should like to let you into my 
secret, but I don't think you have the perseverence to 
work out my system." 

"Perseverence is an unknown quality in your char- 
acter," I said. "But I wish you and your system well, 
(io on and prosper. I shall hold the dinner engagement 
sacred." And so we parted. 

Do not be surprised or uneasy if you do not hear of 
me at my office," said Malthus as we shook 'hands out- 
side the restaurant door. "I shall not commit suicide or 
jump the town if 1 do not succeed. Good-bye." 

About a month after this conversation I met one of 
Malthus' friends. "By the way," he said, "have you seen 
or heard anything of Malthus recently? He has given 
up his office, and tearing that be was ill. 1 called at his 
rooms, but his landlady informed me that he had also 
surrendered them. Do you know if he is still in the 
city?" 

I did not, but I told him that Malthus hinted to me at 
our last meeting not to be surprised if I did not hear of 
him for some time. There tore T bad no anxiety about 
him. 

Days and wicks passed on, and none of us heard of or 
from tin' mysteriously missing Malthus. One evening 
when out for a si mil in the Western Addition. T dropped 
into a Polk street restaurant lor a chop and a glass of ale. 

"Will you have your chop rare or well dune, sir." asked 
the waiter. I looked up from I be paper I was reading, 
and Malthus, with apron and napkin, stood before me. 

"Why, Malthus," I exclaimed, "My poor friend, and 
and has it come to this? Why did you not let your 
friends know that you were so bard up, and we would 
surely have got you something belter than this?" 

"Hush," whispered Malthus, "not a word : this is a 
part of my system. As yon esteem me. do not let any 
one know that you have seen me here, and please do not 
come here again. 1 am all right." Then he added in 
tin' regular .professional sing-song. "rare. sir. yes, sir." 
and 1 beard him shout through the cubbv hole to the 
cook : 

"Chops rare and fried potatoes for one." 

"When Malthus set the dish before me his face was as 
stolid as if be and I bad never met before. I respected 
bis secret, and pondering on the possible nature of Ibis 
mysterious system, left the restaurant. 

Three weeks after this 1 was standing in the California 
Market about midnight. I had eaten my oysters, and 
was deliberating as to wdiich car I should take home, 
when a baker, carving a batch of newly baked bread, 
jostled me. 



"Confound you, cannot you be more careful," I ex- 
claimed angrily, brushing off the flour the collision had 
left on my. coat. 

"Confound yourself: why don't you look out?" re- 
joined the baker saucily. 1 recognized the voice at once. 
It was Malthus. 

"In the name of all that is dark, damnable and mys- 
terious, what arc you masquerading in that costume for?" 
1 said. "Malthus. my dear boy, your reason must be 
affected. Do drop this nonsense. Come, old fellow, 
return to your friends, and all will be forgotten and for- 
given," I added incoherently. 

"You remember your promise," said Malthus, sternly. 
"I am not crazy. dust leave me alone until the 25th of 
December, when I will meet you and dine you at the 
appointed place, if I am alive, as I confidently expect to 
be. This is a part of my system, I tell you. If you 
disturb me you will ruin all. I was never more sane in 
my life. I am on the high road to success now, and I 
must not be thrown off." 

"Be it as you will." I said, sadly, "But 1 never saw a 
baker witb as much flour on his person as you have at 
present. Vou must be a wasteful apprentice. You 
have as much of that useful article on your apron as 
would make a batch of bread." and I turned sadly away, 
for now my suspicions were confirmed. My poor friend 
Malthus was a harmless and incurable lunatic. 

From (bat period up to the month of October I saw 
nothing of my insane friend. But I still kept his secret, 
though I bad serious scruples whether I should not give 
information at the Police Office as to his whereabouts, 
have him arrested and turned over to the doctors. "Per- 
haps." 1 thought, "if his case were promptly attended 
to. he might yet recover. By jove. an insane baker is 
a dangerous person to have al large. He may take it 
into bis head to put arsenic instead of baking powder 
into the bread, and poison entire families. And I, who, 
knowing his condition, permitted him to be at large, 
would be, in a measure, accessory to the act." This re- 
flection so startled me that I was for having him pulled 
up at once, but then again, I changed my mind, and 
concluded to let the community take its chance. 

On a bitter night in November I hurried along Kearny 
street toward its junction with California to take the 
ears for home. It was too late for a down-town supper 
and 1 was deliberating upon what. I should take along for 
a pick when "Here's your tomales. here's your fresh 
chicken tomales." fell upon my ear. Just the thing [ 
thought, and baited before a tomale stand. 

"Two bits worth, please." I said. 

"Here you arc. sir," said the tomale man. handing me 
my package. Cleat heavens! it was Malthus again! 
"Malthus!" I cried, "let this mad business of yours come 
to an end. Come home with me, and to-morrow go 
down town as if nothing bad happened. I mean to say 
1 will give it out that you have just returned from the 
East. 1 will have a notice put in the newspapers to that 
effect, and thus you will be spared the necessity of an- 
swering questions as to your whereabouts during the past 
few months. Do be persuaded by me like a good fellow 7 . 
What arc you throwing yourself away for in this manner? 
Do listen to reason, Malthus." 

"You are forgetting your promise," rejoined Malthus. 
coldly. "I remember yon used to boast about the sacred 
character of a gentleman's word." 

"But, Malthus," I entreated. 

"You are casting yourself between me and my system." 
interrupted Malthus. "Good-bye until the 25th, 

Here's your tomales, lure's your fresh chicken tomales." 
I left him. I saw that argument with a man in bis 
mental condition was a waste of time. 

On Christmas morning I awoke after a strange dream 
of Malthus. I bad dreamed that I saw bini in his coffin. 












but that I 

nil Vi-« 
th.it I || . 

n. lint for mnnl rbaili- 

intcred (ownnl tlir n 

tomcd seal in tin- lower room when ■ wait, i touched mr 
on the shoulder and - 

"Pleaac, sir. there is ■ r.«>m reserved f ■ • i % • -n up 
A gentleman who used to dine with you 
ail month* ago called here this morning and ordered 
dinner served for \on and him al k." 

I «a- nn S i Malthus had turned up nftcr all. 

Mechanically I followed the waiter to the room, which 
-t in the hon-.'. and was tasteful h decorated 
with evergreens and arbutus berries. There was a bottln 
of champagne in an ice pail, a bottle of Burgundy near 
the lire, and a bottle of Chateau le !!"<•• on the table. 
Everything indicatel thai Maltlms had prepared for a 

luxurious feast. While I was yet dazed at the mystery 
of Maltlms. that individual entered and shook me warmly 
by the hand. 

"Merry Christinas to you, old fellow." he said: "I bel 
yon did not expect to see me her.: this evening. August. ■. 
serve the soup. No questions now until the dessert is 
on the table." 

My singular friend was certainly much imnroved. lie 
was fat. ruddy and cheerful. Not a trace of the mys- 
terious manner that had so puzzled me during our pre- 
vious encounters remained. We chatted about ordinary 
matters, hut I was consumed with curiosity to hear his ex- 
planation. When the champagne was opened Malthus 
began : 

"When we parted on that evening in June." lie said. 
■'I started out with the grim determination to win a prize 
in the lottery. Now. I had made a close and exhaustive 
study of this suhjeet. and 1 found that while lawyers. 
doctors, merchants and persons of that class seldom or ever 
drew a prize, waiters in restaurants, cigarmakers, bakers, 
shoe-makers and blacksmiths were almost invariably the 
lucky ones. My course was plain. I became a waiter in 
a restaurant and bought a coupon. I won five dollars 
at the next, drawing. This was encouraging, so I re- 
mained a waiter and tried again. This time I was not so 
fortunate, so, concluding that I had exhausted the waiter's 
] uck, 1 got a position in a beer saloon on the same street, 
and bought a coupon. I bad great faith in the bar-man 
business. Fortune had been very kind to beer-sellers. 
But at the next drawing I was away off from the capital 
prize. I cut the bar business and became a baker. I 
had invested in the lottery the day before I met you in the 
California Market. I stuck at the baking during two 
drawings, but nothing came of it. I got disgusted, .hired 
out as a hostler and won an approximation prize. This 
reassured me. As an hostler I was about to enter in 
upon a colossal fortune. Next time, though, I was 
blank, so I left my situation, and wi.th a small capital, 
set up in business as a tomale merchant. I thought how 
well it would read in the newspapers about the poor 
tomale man, shivering on the street-corner, and shoving 
his wares upon an unwilling public; awaking, one fine 
morning, to find himself the possessor of fifteen thousand 
dollars. But it didn't work. The fickle goddess gave 
the tomale merchant the go-bye, and I quit it in disgust. 
1 became a shoeblack. 

"I was now pretty close to the bottom of the industrial 
scale, and with more confidence than 1 had yet enter- 
tained. I bousht two coupons. I never ventured on a 
whole ticket. There is no record of any man winning a 
big lottery, prize on a whole ticket. But the bootblack 



furi'l titan tin- - m oi 

• 

I ■ 
i 
anotht 

l..iiif 111 litigation in the I our family, and 

Ih which I Intend t alee i 

n life. But you will acknowledge." added 
Maltlms. "that - not to I. 1 

lainly not. my dear boy." I said. "I congratu- 
..ii ,.n your good fortune. Vout ence is 

the heal assurance that there is lot., of good stulT in von. 
and tint you are calculated to succeed in life." 

"Thank you, thank you." said Malthus; "hut." he 
lidded, musingly, "it ought to have won." 

Han Francisco New* Letter. Dec. 85, 1886.) 



RESTRICTIONS REMOVED. 

Mr. II. V. llallon. proprietor of tin- Hotel Rafael, al 
San Rafael, Cal., is in receipt of a letter from I;, x. Ryan, 
General Passenger and Freight Agent of the California' 
Northwestern Railway Company, enclosing copies of regu- 
lations governing the transportation ..f automobiles on 
the ferry boats between San Francisco and Tiburon, and- 
San Francisco and Bansalito. The regulations ami con- 
ditions stipulated are the same that prevail on all other 
ferry boat,- ..f the Southern Pacific Company. Now that 

the embargo is lilted on the Tiburon and Sausalilo ferries 

the picturesque drives of Marin County will be the delight 

..f the automobilists. The run will take in the Hotel 
Rafael, of Coar8e, and the hotel grounds around the cluii 
bouse will no doubt look like an automobile show. 



The action that General Greeley was compelled 

to take in driving from the Presidio refugee camps the 
women domestics who were loafing there when families 
"ieded help, supports the theory that many arc living 
on the relief fund who are able to work. It seems to me 
(hat the best way to dispose of this whole relief matter 
would he to divide the fund among the refugees. There 
is on hand $6,000,000, about $150 for each person non- 
living on the fund. A family of four would receive 
$600 — enough to start in a small business or to make part 
payment on a home. Of course, the argument is made 
that many of the refugees would spend their money a? 
soon as it was received. What of it? They did that be- 
fore the lire, but did not become public charges. If 
each should receive his share now and should waste it, 
he would have to look out for himself as he did when he 
" went broke " before the fire. 



Following were among the arrivals at Hotel Del 
J?onte for week ending July 21st: E. W. Bunyon, Mrs. 
M. A. Swan, Florence Piper, Lilly K. Piper. Miss M. M. 
Pearce, M. G. Pfoff, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Faull, W. E. 
Loucks, Mis. E, K. Baker. Mr. and Mrs. J. 1'. Singleton. 
H. J. Zcchlin, Mr. and M,Vs. Arthur M. Brown, T. B. Fitz- 
patrick, Dr. L. J. McMahon, Louis Ferrari, 0. S. Nordell, 
IT. C. Brcedcn, Mr. and Mrs. Lerov Frasier, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander Hamilton. 



Chicago sent 1400 number S women's shoes. There 

isn't a woman in the refugee camps these shoes will fit. 
This was a natural error on the part of Chicago. St. 
Loins papers please copy. 



The Merchants' Association has endorsed the policy 

of auxiliary salt water cisterns advocated by the News 
Letter since 1876. 



Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Winstow's Soothing Syrup ' 

for your children while teething. 



20 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 190G 




VDMOBILE 



S^L 



Saij Francisco is enjoying more favorable conditions 
at tlic present time, in the automobile line, than any other 
city in the United States. This, of course, is due to the 
splendid showing that the motor car made in the mosi 
trying times thai ever were encountered in this country. 
The advantage gained by iliis good showing is no excuse 
for the lax methods that have been observed by some 
owners. 

There is a State law that requires that every machine 
shall display a number which has been assigned at the 
time of registration at Sacramento, The makers of the 
automobile laws undoubtedly had in mind al the time 
that this would be a safeguard to a certain extent to those 
who religiously observed the laws. But at present there 
seems to be a lack of appreciation of the good that the 
requirement of the display of numbers effects. 

Ever since the isth of April the number law seems to 
have taken on the character of a dead letter. Xow, as 
the city has resumed its normal conditions, it is observed 
that some unscrupulous ehaull'eurs are taking advantage 
of tlie leniency of the police, ami are driving their cars 
in such a way that even the public of San Francisco, who 
are favorably disposed towards the automobile, are hav- 
ing cause for complaint. It is observed (hat most of these 
drivers who are responsible for this adverse comment 
carry no numbers at all. or a number that is not discern- 
ible within a radius of ten feet. 

It should be the duty of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia, which is responsible for the passage of (he rigorous 
acts by the Legislature of this State to see that the part 
of the law requiring the display of numbers on the auto- 
mobiles be strictly observed. If the police department 
of the city is lax in its enforcement of the law. the club 
should see that due notice of the condition of affairs is 
forcibly brought to the attention of (he heads of the de- 
partment. If the officials (hen fail to effect the required 
results, the club should go further and place the matter 
before the Police Commissioners. 

It may be that some day a frightful accident will occur 
through the reckless driving of an automobile. It may 
also happen that the automobile will be without a num- 
ber, or will have its figures too minute to be legible. Then 
it will happen that the public, who now stand for speeding 
beyond the legal limits, will turn and demand the pound 
of flesh from the owners. 

It is foolish to think that every driver of an automobil : 
is a perfect and careful driver of a machine. As in every 

other ease in life, (here are those that hold positions that 
they are not qualified to (ill, and they sooner or later do 
something that proves their inability. If the result of 
their shortcomings can be traced directly to their door. 
it exonerates all others who tread the same path of life, 
but if it is impossible to bring the errors home, the sus- 
picion rests on all those who are engaged in like pursuits, 
in the case of the automobilists, experience has shown 
that not only the hired help, but the owners, must suffer 
by such suspicion. It is amusing to observe the conditions 
of the numbers borne by the ears. In most cases they are 
so covered with dirt as to hi' undecipherable. Rut at the 
same time, is the car itself in the same condition? Surely 
not, for an owner would not stand for such a condition 
of his car. The ordinary care of a machine compels him 
to observe the most minute requirements as to the clean- 
liness of hearings ami trappings. Dirt means wear ami 
great expense. But as for the number — it is only put 



there to satisfy the law, and if it is encased in a few inches 
of dirt, absolutely hidden from sight by the grease and 
filth that enshrouds it. why. what of it? It must be 
there to lill the hill of the police force, but it need uot 
be legible, or such as that it will be annoying in case of 
a mischance on the road. 

To the man who is honest ill his attempt to observe the 
spirit of the law. it scents that a clean, legible sign is in- 
lispensahle. What slum I il it be there for if i( cannot be 
read by any passer-by in ease of accident? Rut to the 
iiitoist who cares more for his dash of speed, his record- 
breaking spurt, than he does for any cop in Christendom, 
the having of a number that can be read from the side 
of a road seems the height of folly. It seems as absurd 

as showing your hand to an opponent in the gentle ga 

of poker. To him a besmeared legend covers a multitude 
of sins. 

We have had a hard lime together, it must be confessed. 
But that lime is past. We have allowed many things to 
get down in the heels, and have had no word of rebuke 
for those that have let the little things slide. Live anil 
let live has been a very popular motto on all sides. But 
the emergency has passed, and no need any longer exists 
for this menace. 

1 1 is now time for every true lover of (he sport, for 
the automobile club that fosters the best interests of the 
game, for Chief Dinan. whose duly it is to see that the 
laws of the commonwealth are rigorously observed through 
times of trial and of good sport alike, to see that this 
provision of (he statute is lived up to. 
* * * 

Logan Waller Rage, Director of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, has issued some interesting fig- 
ures showing the extent of new roads which have been 
recently built, together with the total number of miles. 
Tin major portion of the States have less than ten per 
cent of the roads improved, which is a startling showing- 
for a country claiming one of the premiere positions in 
the civilized world. 

Tennessee has 48,989 miles of public road, or one mile 
for every forty-one inhabitants, of which only about nine 
per cent has been improved. 

Virginia has 51,802 miles improved, giving but one 
mile of improved roads to ever;- 1,158 inhabitants. North 
Carolina lias 19,763 miles. Oregon has 34,358 miles: 
Iowa. 102,488 miles: Arkansas, 36,445 miles; Arizona, 
5,981 miles: Alabama. .-,(1.089 miles; Washington. 31,998 
miles, and New Hampshire, to. Dili miles. In most of 
these Slates there is one mile of ordinary road for every 
25 to :;."i inhabitants, but of improved roads there is only 
one mile for anywhere from -lit to 1,255 inhabitants. 

Taking these figures into consideration, it is clearly 
seen that the United Slates is far inferior (o many of 
the countries which it has led in other respects. What is 
everybody's Imsinoss is no one's. Tt is certainly in order 
for California, now that the attention of the world is 
turned towards her. to start a movement for good roads. 
Our State has led others in progressiveness. Its spirit 
alreadv has challenged the sister States in the Union 

Let ns have good roads, and quickly, so that it will attract 

the attention of the automobile world to (he Stale. It 
will draw the owners of automobiles to California as a 

playground, and with them will undoubtedly e 

moneyed interests thai will more than recompense the 
community t'>r expenditure on improved mails. " It's 
time lo play hall." 

• • * 
' The last word about auto touring ears has been spoken. 
In choice Weherlieldian English has a German editor 
said it. Here it is: 
"Automobiling in the machine is not: in the chauffeur 

is it." 



- 



- 






The Proper Rent Service 



Our cars cannot he distinguished 
from private vehicles as only the 
latest side entrance high grade 
PopeToledo touring cars are used. 

GOLDEN STATE AUTO ■ 
S. Hale. General Mr 
Relocated al 547-51 Fulton v 
Sun Francisco, Cal. 
Phone Park 385. 



The Accessible 

PREMIER 



24 H. P. 



LIGHT, 

SPEEDY 

DURABLE 



106 inch wheel base, 4-cylin- 
der, air cooled, 

3 speeds and reverse, se- 
lective type, sliding gears, 
$2,150.00. 

Demonstration by appointment with 

E. P. Slosson, 

Agent. Northern California 

SAN FRANCISCO 



TRICYCLE COMPANYS 

Jnvail^Rolling Chairs 

^dYrTcycle chairs 

for the di«W<:d ire the- »cme of perfection 

2018 Market St., San Francisco, California 

837 Soulh Spring St., Lot Angclc* 



i 

• 
•ridden ! 

in tli.' 

ihnHnw of M in Blanc. In mi 

of mi inter- 

With tli,. . i, .NT. a|i|i 

imIhiIiIi.I I he 

\ . ireful study 
<>f the artirle in - ti np- 

realh doea 
believe thai tin- lieal aulomnhil- 
ither with the chauf- 
feur than wiili tin car, thai 
one best driver in sympathy with 
the mechanism "f any one of, 
say. the ten hesl pars on the mar- 
ket, and the problem of touring 
is Boh ed as well ns it ever can be ; 
that any one of the ten besl 
machii . iod as another : 

that whatever improvement is at- 
tainable in the eporl is to be 
found in improved roads and 
skilled drivers. The Scheff party 
expects to pile up a record of 
about fifteen thousand miles be- 
fore, returning to this side in 
August. 

* * * 

There are more than 1 L,000 
Cadillacs in daily service. 

* * * 

The White is the tire saving 
car. 

* * * 

Pnpr Advises Autoists In go Slow 
Archbishop Farley has ejreal 

admiration for the Pope's famil- 
iarity with American affairs. 
The Pontiffs health, said the 
archbishop, was good, and he 
showed no trace of his recent ill- 
ness. When Archbishop Parley 
presented Mr. and Mrs. John B. 
Manning, of Buffalo, and men- 
tioned that they were automo- 
bilinsr through Italy, the Pope, 
shaking his head, said they in- 
deed had need of a hlessinsr. 
Then turning to them, he added : 
"May. you have no collisions and 
no accidents. Ood bless yon, but 
go slow." 



COLUMBIA 24-28 Horse Power 

At Readville, Mass., races last month won the ten-mile handicap 
event for stock cars, beating ten other machines of leading makes 

"In winninj this race the Columbia lived up to ita great reputation of a year ago. '-Boston Herald. 

ABUNDANCE OF SPEED AND POWER 

Another car of the same model, stripped, made the fastest mile of any 
stock car, irrespective of size or power, during the Readville races. 

MaddletOR MOtOr-Car CO. Golden Gate Av^SanFrancisco 





Making Dust 
on a Hill 



Every motorist knows 
that to "spurt" up a long 
hill requires a tremendous 
amount of reserve energy ; 
that to reach and sustain 
high speed under such con- 
ditions an engine must be 
capable of developing great 
power. These quali- 
fications have 
made the 




'I 



i 



famous 
not only as a 
hill-climber but as a car 
always to be depended upon, 
no matter how severe the service. 
And with it all the cost of main- 
tenance is so low that a small allow- 
ance for fuel and lubrication prac- 
tically covers the season's outlay. 

Your nearest dealer (his address 
will be furnished upon application) 
is waiting for an opportunity to 
tell you more about the Cadillac. 
See him. Also let us send our 
Illustrated Booklet JE • 

Model H. 10 It. p. Runabout . 
Model M, Light Touring Car (shown above) 
Model H, 30 h. p. Touring Car. 
Lamps not Included. 

Cadillac Motor Car Co., 
Detroit, Mich. 

Member Ass a. Licensed Auto, flfrs* 



For sale by Cuyler Lee. 106 Preiidio Ave., San Francisco, 
and Lee Molor Car Company.,' 1 032 So. Main street, Los Angeles. 

AUTO TIPS 

SAN JOSE — Hotel Vendome. Rendezvous for 
automobiles, Bathing pavilion; commodious 
garage; gasoline at all hours. 

FOR gasoline, sundries and repairs at San 
Jose stop at Letcher's Automobile Garage, 
coiner First and St. James. Tel. Main 303. 

LOS OLIVOS— Hotel Los Olivos. . Midway be- 
tween Santa Barbara ana San Luis Obispo. 
First-class in all respects; auto parties run- 
ning between San Francisco and Los Angeles 
all stop here. Good .shooting and fishing dur- 
ing seasons. 

HEADQUARTERS— ^— — 

Automobile Clothing for Men and Women 
ROOS BROS. 
Goggles, Hoods. Robes, Etc. Fillmore and O'Farrell St 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 130(3 




! AR 



THE MIRROR. 
A lover sought his loved one's dwelling-place, 
And all audacious, craved its hidden grace; 
Without the rose-wreathed door, he fearless, knocked — 
Oh, grief; to find the cruel portals locked. 

Then from within, sweel as the perfumed air. 
Music's own voice cried: "Who awaits me there?'' 
Now heed ye well the Lover's bold reply, 
•' Behold, my Rose of Irene, it is I !" 

"(Jo hence, within my garden rich with bloom, 
For Me and Thee besides, there is no room." 
The Lover left, to meditate apart 
The cause and cure of his imperfect heart. 

In great humility he sought once more 

An entrance at the fair forbidden door: 

Again the voice of nightingale and lute 

Cried: "Who comes here, my garden to salute?" 

The Lover answered, freed from his old self. 
"I pray thee lift the veil, it is Thyself!" 
'" Since thou hast learned the human heart to win. 
Enter!" replied the voice. " T am within." 

— Adapteil from Hie Persian of Riimis by Margaret 
Ridgely Partridge in Harper's Monthly Magazine. 



LOVE'S BLOSSOMING. 
When soft on the hillside the spring winds were blowing. 

And summer stirred sleepily under the sod — 
When through the cold earth the warm consciousness 
stealing 

Brought violets voicing the whispers of (hid; 
When out of the silence came bird notes appealing. 

And nest-builders darted abroad on swift wing — 
Like song, in my heart, came the love of you stealing, 

As sweet as the meadow-lark's greeting to spring. 
Like blossoming Mav was your love's first beginning, 

With fragrance half-wild, and a dream of a Hush : 
When I told you 1 loved you, your shy assent winning. 

June's glorious roses were throned in your blush. 
Xow . . . deeper and dearer your love than in .Tune- 
tide 

And goal of (he midsummer bee, is my goal — 
For as sweets in the heart of the lily at noontide. 

The goal of your love in the white of your soul ! 

— Edna Ningsley Wallace vn The Critic. 



DO YOU MISS ME WHERE YOU ARE? 
Do you miss me where you are-— 

You who held me dear? 
While you roam from star to star, 

Do you pause to hear 
If there be a pleading cry 

• From the world you knew. 
On the restless wind-swept by, 

Calling, calling, you? 
Does the Long-ago come back — 

Or have you forgot? 
Does the present something lack 

Since the past is not! 
If my voice from far away 

Can but reach vour ear. 
Pause an instant. Love, and sav 

That the Far is Near. 

— Louise Chandler Monllon in Scribner'x. 



THE MAC KAY PROFESSORSHIP. 

At the meeting Tuesday of the Finance Committee of 
the Regents, President Wheeler transferred to them 
$100,000 .00 which had been placed in his hands by Mr. 
Clarence II. Mackay for the foundation of the John W. 
Mackay, Jr. Professorship of Electrical Engineering in 
memory of his brother. Mr. Clarence H. Mackay and 
Mrs. John W. Mackay, his mother, share equally in the 
making of the gift. It is a tribute of affection and sym- 
pathy toward the State of California and its people in 
their distress. Mrs. Mackay and her son have always 
maintained a strong feeling of attachment to California 
and desire that no impairment of activity in its highest 
institution of learning shall result from the recent dis- 
aster, but rather fresh energy and more determined prog- 
ress. The foundation of the Professorship is cast in the 
broadest terms, as the income may be applied as well to 
I lie equipment and encouragement of research in connec- 
tion with the chair as in the support of the chair itself. 
The selection of the subject, "Electrical Engineering," 
is connected evidently with a dominant interest of the 
family. In his communication to the President Mr. 
Mackay formulates the terms and purposes of the gift 
as follows: 

"I beg to state that my idea is that the gift of $100.- 
000.00. from ray mother and myself, take the form of the 
foundation of the John W. Mackay, Jr., Professorship 
of Electrical Engineering; with the understanding thai 
the Regents apply the annual income, in whole or in 
part, according to their judgment, to the salary of the 
incumbent of the chair and expend any balance in the 
equipment and maintenance of the work connected there- 
with, the original fund to be kept intact in perpetuity.'' 



LAST UNIVERSITY CONCERT. 

The last of the present series of concerts which have 
been given by the University of California in the Greek 
Theatre during the present summer is set for half-past 
three next Thursday afternoon, August second. The 
honor of closing the series falls to the Minetti String 
Quartette, all four of whom are members of the University 
Orchestra, which has this summer given three symphony 
concerts in the Greek Theatre during recent weeks. The 
quartette is composed of Giulio Minetti, first violin; Hans 
Koenig, second violin; Andre Verdier, viola, and Arthur 
Weiss, violoncello. The programme will be as follows: 
Quartette in F. Major (op. 18, No. 1) in the following 
movements: Allegro con brio; Adagio affetuoso ed ap- 
pasionato : Scherzo-Allegro molto; and Allegro. Next will 
be "Lento" (from American Quartette in F. op. 96), 
Dvorak, and "Canzonetta " (from Quartette in op. 12) 
Mendelssohn. "~ 



(f 



HOTEL 

ST. FRANCIS 



: % 



America's 

Model 

Hotel 

HAVE YOU SEEN THE 

St*. Francis 
Annex? 

200 Outside Rooms 

on the lawns of 

Union Square 

\1 Famous Grill Room Running Again 



J 






% \ v ' IKK 






UB^tiifeTABLF 




• I'm. 

wton Churchill has produced a maatcrpiei 
The ^r> name ..f the hero pred 
• "•''•tin Irength »n. I 

• scrupulousness. Wc have known Jethros 
in real life. Wc have known the dangerous political boas 
■•f this character— dangerous to the State and ideal to his 
intonates. Sometimes his power is pelf-founded, some- 
tunes it is by hypnotism it grows; at othi ,1 fear 

controls the captains of the hundreds and the sub-lieu- 
tenants of the thousands, and makes them do his bidding 
1 1»- deep organ note of the theme in "Coniston " is the 
story of the political phase, and tins phase tin. Is a repeti- 
tion with variations in the history of every State in the 
I Minn. The delightful minor chord is' the story of 
"Cynthia." Churchill 1ms met with singular success 
where other novelists have failed. He lias managi 
weave golden tin-cads of romance among the rough Btrands 
of political l.rass: two love stories interwoven through the 
stirring fight for boss rule or corporation control in New 
Hampshire. 
He has painted character with an unerring brush. He 

has portrayed the Yankee at home on his own dunghill, 
narrow-minded in daily life, loving to his clan, large- 
minded when dealing with the world, a mixture of greal 
delicacy and a lack of culture, a complex character, a 
fine composite picture. He has followed the queer intri- 
cacies of mind of the type in its men and women, and 
has given us the perfection of its manhood and woman- 
hood in Cynthia 2 and in " Bob Worthington." 

The author reminds us in his preface that people dis- 
covered, or thought they discovered, the originals in the 
"Crisis" in St. Louis citizens, much to the discomfort of 
their descendants. And so, he tells us that he did not 
paint the pictures of real flesh and blood people in "Conis- 
ton," and yet we do recognize the individual in the type. 
We have known the men and women, and so true has 
been the limning that the greater number of the charac- 
ters have already been located and labeled, ticketed for 
future use in Churchill's campaign. 

The style of the writing is enchanting. The introduc- 
tory paragraph carries you back to " Lorna Doone" — a 
half-forgotten fragrance of the woodland. The descrip- 
tions of "Coniston Mountain " are but transitory, and all 
too short. At other times we are reminded of the work 
of a police reporter on a daily newspaper, and the author 
becomes flippant. But splendid, good, bacVand indifferent 
as passages may appear, Winston Churchill has written 
a great novel, possibly the greatest American novel — so 
long sought. 

A resume of "Coniston?" it would be like first reading 
the last chapter of a good book. Some people delight in 
this indefensible act. They are literary degenerates. Read 
the book yourself. Read it from the beginning, and you 
will read it to the end. 

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle deals with the political aspi- 
rations of Winston Churchill in the following: 

" The unexampled success of Upton Sinclair in turning 
the Congress of the United States and the Parliament of 
Great Britain into billboards for the advertisement of 
his beef packing novel, seems to have inspired Mr. Win- 
ston Churchill with a desire to turn a political trick or 
two in behalf of his novel of New Hampshire politics. 
Mr. Churchill is announced as the candidate for Governor 
of that State of the Lincoln part}', and his platform is 



in. I walk "IT with ll 
ml power. T) ... ,f the Lincoln Repu 

to Ml lb.- -,, r th thai : 

depleting the lobby and tin 
>in.| theii machinations, and appealing I 
throw <>tT their yokl . ■ | ,„■),. Tom's 

Cabin.' which \> 

insidious, perhaps, but no more real or vicious, To 
that tin- Mai.- is exempt from the general condition) 
which \our book describes would i»- sheer blindni 
rank hypocrisy . 

The merest tyro in \.» Hampshire politics know-, 
that the course of her Government does nol run free and 
untrammelled, as a Government of, by and For the people 
should, Ian that, on the contrary, nominations, appoint- 
ments, elections and legislation arc largely dictated by a 
powerful lobby, Fostered by mean- ol the varied, seductive 
and compelling agencies a! its command.' 

"Among the sign, is of that appeal are the Bishop of the 
Episcopal dioeese. a professor of Dartmouth Coll. . 
former Judge of the Supreme Couri and a former 
mayor of Concord. <»r course, as a circulation raiser, s 
bishop is nol tn In- compared with a president or a 
supreme court judge to a member of the British cabinet 
answering questions in the House of Commons, but we 
submit that in the recondite art of literary advertisement 
Mr. Churchill is getting on. The unrivaled Sinclair may 
scorn this candidacy for a rock-hound governorship, bin 
we feel sure that George Bernard Shaw, who once wrote, 
" I am a hardened and tolerably expert advertiser my- 
self," would recognize Mr. Churchill's claims to considera- 
tion in his class. Shaw might, not "take off my hat " to 
the New Hampshire novelist, as he did in print to Dusc, 
in connection with his own claims to high rank as an 
advertiser, but running for office on the strength of a 
novel dealing with political corruption would appeal to 
the Shaw fancy." 



CHANSON. 



J'ai dit a mon coeur, a mon faible coeur, 
N'est-ce point assez d'aimer sa maitresse? 
Et ne vois-tu pas que changer sans eesse, 
C'est perdre en desirs le temps du bonheur? 

II m'a repondu : Ce n'est point assez. 
Ce n'est point assez d'aimer sa maitresse; 
Et ne vois-tu pas que changer sans eesse, 
Xous rend doux et chers les plaisirs passes! 

J'ai dit a mon coeur, a mon faible coeur: 
N'est-ce point assez de tant de tvistesse ? 
Et ne vois-tu pas que changer sans eesse, 
C'est a chaque pas trouver la douleur? 

II m'a repondu: Ce n'est point assez, 
Ce n'est point assez de tant de tristesse,; 
Et ne vois-tu pas que changer sans eesse, 
Nous rend doux et chers les chagrins passes? 

— Alfred de Mimet. 



The unusually low registration will work harm to 

our city. Remember that the booths were packed by Ruef, 
to prevent the registration of the decent citizens, when the 
harm comes. 



FOR THE NURSERY— FOR TEE TABLE. 
For all ages, in all climates, under all conditions, Bor- 
den's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk and Peerless Brand 
Evaporated Cream . fill every milk requirement. Superior 
for ice-cream. 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, lOOfi 



■10 III) AX AND THE CELESTIAL. 

The aftermath of the fire brought to light ninny good 
stories of the strenuous days and many humorous inci- 
dents. One of the best that has been told is the experi- 
ence of Dr. David Starr Jordan with his Chinese cook 
on the morning of April 18th. 

All Sing was an exceptionally bright Chinese, and bad 
for years been a faithful servant to the noted professor. 
During the period of bis service be picked up many scraps 
of science, digesting them in an Oriental manner. 

One of the most interesting of the sciences was. to him, 
astronomy, and he took great delight in waiting for the 
eclipses and various manifestations of the wonders of the 
universe which the doctor was able to foretell to him. 
Whenever such a phenomenon approached. Dr. Jordan 
would inform him of the exact time when it was expected, 
ami the Celestial would faithfully await it. 

On the morning id' the 'quake, Dr. and Mrs. Jordan were 
frightfully shaken up. The contents of their room were 
thrown at their heads and after the I'.' or 58 or 88 seconds 
had elapsed (whatever the exact time may have been), 
they emerged, startled and bruised from the wreckage of 
I heir bed. ami surveyed the ruin. Before their minds 
bad bad time to fully grasp the situation, a pajama-clad 
figure dashed into their room, and Ah Sing, bis almond 
eves almost round, franticall" yelled at the professor: 
" Why the bell you no tellee me?" 

The doctor's response is not on record. 



It 



CAPTAIN JULIUS W. KILIAN. 
The conviction of Captain Julius W. Kilian, U. S. A., 
for battery on a woman refugee, has centered all eyes on 
him for the moment. It is something unheard of before 
in (be public life of an American "officer and gentleman' 
lo be baled before a police judge on such an ignoble 
charge. Captain Kilian has not been exactly brought up 
in the service, however, and this may be an excuse for his 
infringement of established precedents which order (lie 
conduct of graduates from West Point. Kilian is an 
irregular transformed into a regular by the grace of the 
Chief Executive. In 1898 he was a captain of militia 
in Nehraska, was promoted to Major in June. 1899, and 
honorably mustered out in August of the same year. His 
connection with the regular forces dates from 1891 when 
be was appointed from Xehraska to a position of Com- 
missary ill the Subsistence Department of the Army with 
the rank of Captain. The Army roster gives his place 
of nativity as Germany. It is safe to presume that the 
Captain's temper must have been sorely tried in his pres- 
ent position, and that the charge of battery was of purely 
technical character. Allowance must of course be made 
for all Ibis in considering the verdict of a judge placed 
himself in an ugly position, the batteries of a hundred 
irate females turned upon him. Extenuating circum- 
stances and the sterling reputation of the Captain him- 
self would serve in his favor with the general public, 
placed as he has been, as a scapegoat for the chief officers, 
had not some of them taken up the cudgels in his hehalf. 
The result is an exhibition of feeling which shows plainly 
the men moie than their methods of handling the 
money and goods subscribed for the relief of victims of 
disaster in this city are very distasteful to the people at 
large 



Eugene E. Schmitz is not the author of the book 

entitled "A Perfect Mayor." Mr. Schmitz is too busy 
with the Police Commissioners at present to write his 
autobiography. He was thinking of turning the work over 
in Abraham Ruef, a collaborator in many successful en- 
terprises — literary and otherwise — but fortunately for his 
ambition, learned that his erstwhile bosom friend was 
going around with a rubber stamp in his pocket, on which 
was printed " Schmitz," and a number of double crosses. 



! % 



Low Rates 



TO 



Mt. Shasta, Yosemite Valley, 
Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa 
Cruz, Monterey, Pacific Grove and 
points in the northern counties 



Season Excursions 



Return limit. October 2 1 . Tickets on sale daily 



Southern Pacific 



Vi 



J 



Paul V. Garin 

Diamond Jeweler 

has re-opened with an immense new stock 
of diamonds, watches and fine jewelry at 

1552 Fillmore Street 



The Grill 



C.M.SOLARI 
Proprietor 

Formerly of Palace Hotel Grill 

911 ELLIS STREET, NEAR VAN NESS o/lVE. 



Now Open 

Duplicating the Palace Grill Service 

Alfred £. Blake, M. D. 

Diseases of the Mouth and Teeth 

Office Hours, 8:30 to 9:30 cAM.;2:00 to 3:30 P. M. 

Office— 1703 O'Farrell St., cor. Fill more, San Francisco 

TELEPHONE WEST 4003. 






|M 






SCANDINAVIAN-AMERICAN 
SAVINGS BANK 

Chronicle Building 

Transacts a general 
banking busines 

Interest paid on de- 
posits. 

Special attention giv- 
en to the transferring 
of money to Foreign 
Countries. 



imu 

tlicir 

■ I at ii 

. r l>\ Wil- 
liam Hngertv. tin newlj npnoint- 
nl I'n . I .- oner. Ii is 

fortunate that I) one 

<iri|»' mi the comni 



MURPHY GRANT & GO. 

Wholesale and Dry Goods 

8th and Franklin Streets, - - Oakland, Gal. 

New goods constantly arriving and on sale 
at our temporary quarters, Eight and Franklin 
Streets, Oakland, Cal. 

The erection of a new steel structure will im- 
mediately be commenced on our old site, Bush 
and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 



Tin' _■ -vm Kin n- 

nni worry bo much 

over the ini--.li'. wliUk\ n- he 

ivcr tlio quality of that 
which _ Be ore the 

fire there wore a San 

Francisco where one could obtain 
a drink of f.-iitK decenl liquor, 
lint that sold now is like the two 

brands of Texas whisky, 01 i 

which was i as feeling 

like a porcupine crawling down 
the throat, and the oilier like 
1 m 1 1 i 11 ir the same animal back In 
the tail. 



tt 



% 



1 1' spending money for 

pictures made one an art connois- 
seur, J. Pierponl Morgan would 
rank high. Bui as il is, he ranks 
hi^li only as a spender. 



Hotel Imperial 

931 EDOY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

One block from Van Ness avenue 



European Plan 

Electric Cars Direct From Ferries 

Telephones, Electric Lights, Elevator 

Baths, Steam Heat 

Every Courtesy and Attention 



The longer the insurance 

companies keep the wolf from 
the door, the louder il will howl 
around the doors of the policy- 
holders. 



Horses are extremely 

scarce in the Northwest. They 
will be more plentiful when the 
Packingtown reforms get well in- 
augurated. 



E. S. DeWOLFE, Proprietor 

V _ J)) 

Samuel M. Shortridge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1101 O'Farrell Street, corner Franklin Street, 
San Francisco. 



t: 



7— ■•-'••- V 



MAKTSMOHN 
Sli \l)i: ROI LER5 



Wood Roll.rt Tin Hotter* 




See Spences 



Invisible, neatest eyeglass in the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL CO. 
1315 Golden Cate Avenue at Fillmore 



CHINN-BERETTA OPTICAL COMPANY 



New Campi's Restaurant 

NOW OPEN 

French and Italian Dinners 

1569 Ellis St., Near Fillmore 



The Northern Indians 

evidently look upon the looting 
of their ancestors' cemeteries by 
curio seekers as a grave offense. 



Have Located at 



1821 Fillmore Street 

Between Bush and Sutter Streets 

San Francisco, Cal, 



OAKLAND OFFICE 



466 13TH STREET 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, Snn Prnnclnco. CiOifnrnin. 
Location of work*. Virginia City, Store; County, Nando, 

Notice Is hereby given flint at ft meeting of the Board if Directors, 
hold OH tha 6th day of .li.ly.IHM. an n»w<i>nu<nl (No :,) of Ion (10) 

cents per itiarc mu lovfod oi lha capita] itock of the corporation, 

pnynlile iuiuiedintcty in United States gold coin, to tlio aerrctnry, nt 
the office of Hi" company, B80 Bnah Street. .Son Pranolioo, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment .shall remain unpaid 00 tin- 
Huh day of AOgurt, IMS, will be delinquent and advertised for eale at 
jmhlic auction, and. unless payment Is iiimle before, will be sold on 
FRIDAY, tho 31st day of August, JHt, nt 1 o'clock p, m.. to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the Goat of advertising uml ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Direclora, 

JOHN \V. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office, 3J1D Bush street, San Francisco, California. 



The Czar is likely to find 

that the dissolution of Parlia- 
ni. 'nt means the dissolution of 

Nicholas. 



A despatch from London 

says that physicians favor tinned 
meats. Sure — it makes work for 
them. 



Three a month commit- 

ed suicide in Oakland. True, 
there are nicer places than Oak- 
l anc l — but why not adopt a less 
fata] method of leaving it? 



The Maryland 

NOW OPEN 

Apartments or Rooms 
with private baths 

Page Street, near Laguna 

M.G.Lytton,Prop. 



Smiths Gash Store 



Mutual and co-operative, Now No. 16 Steu- 
art Street, San Francisco, just around the cor- 
ner from the old location. First store on city- 
front to resume Mail OrderB exclusively. 



SAX FHAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 38, 1906 



Continental 
Casualty Company 

CHICAGO 

Writes all forms of Accident and Health 
Insurance. 

Saved all its records and is doing busi- 
ness as heretofore. 

Producers and all others interested address 

W. H. BETTS, 

Manager. 

54 and 55 Bacon Building, Oakland, Cal. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

of Philadelphia, Penn. 
Alliance of Philadelphia 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 5.822,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 

Minim/urn I- Building, San Fraiuixca. 

Pacific Surety Company 

of CALIFORNIA 
FIDELITY COURT AND CONTRACT 
BONDS 
PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Bonds for lost policies, bank books, or 
change of occupancy will be furnished by 
this Company. 

Paid-up Capital $250,000 

Cash Assets 428,000 

Officers: Wallace Everson, President; 
John Bermlngham, Vice-President; A. P. 
Redding, Secretary. 

326 Montgomery Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd 

of Liverpool. 

Capital $0,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents, 

416 Jackson St. San Francisco 

Ptienix Insurance Company 

of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

J. H. LENEHAN, General Agent. 

A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast. 

Temporary Offices: 

Polytechnic Hall, Corner 12th and Harrison Sts. 

Oakland 

Fire, Marine and Inland Insurance. 

Fireman's Fund 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Odd Fellows' Building, 

Cor. Eleventh and Franklin Sts., Oakland. 

Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco 



IE® SralbifflrtaniDft® 

Lei Judge Melvin rejoice in 
the congratulations which are 
showered upon him on accounl 
of his election to the headship of 
the Elks, l.ci him also remem- 
ber the amount of abuse that he 

will stiller in :i few weeks when 

be seeks to realize his aspira- 
tions for ili ■ Supreme Bench. 
Verily, life is full of ups and 
downs. 

* * * 

Was there ever a town like 
i lakland for the literary bug? 
The Fact thai one or two distin- 
guished writers have at some 
time or other resided in the place 
is regarded as sufficient grounds 
Pot the booming of any amateur 
who threatens to turn her lucu- 
brations loos < dpon a suffering 
world. The Saturday evening 
papers are literally nauseous 
with this kind of booming. 

* * * 

The town of Alameda lias 
a hoard of health, which, if it is 
aware of its own existence, at 
leasl does not know what its 
duties are. Tt allows Bay Farm 
Island, within a half mile of the 
pdge of town, to be used as a 
dumping ground for garbage. 
Bay Farm Island is a beautiful 
nlace. given over mainly to 
reeetable gardens. There is a 
laree portion of it which is 
marshy. Tf it he absolutely 
necessarv that garbage h^ 
dumped on the island, a road 
mighl be built in the center of 
orio of the large expanses 
marsh, and the refuse deposite 
there, instead, it is put along 

!he main r I For pearli a mil 

the highway is lined with a foul 
; nrl odorous mess of stuff from 
every garbage can in town. Tt 
festers and ferments in the sun. 
smells to hish heaven, and draws 
millions of Hies, which, leaving 
it. floek to the residences in town. 

The inhabitants of the island are 
forced to pass this filthy mess 
on their wav to and from the 
mainland. The island was for- 
merly a Sunday outing place for 
people who liked to stroll across 
it to the beach on the San Fran- 
cisco bav side. Now. however. 

they avoid it. 

* * * 

The residents of the East End 
of Alameda are indisrnant over a 
varnish factory that has been 
built at the end of Bri' rn, s Ave- 
nue, on the San Leandro bav 
shore. Tt is a pretty spot, with 

nice residei - scattered all 

around, and with boat house- !>. 
the dozen lining the shore. The 
factory not only spoils the gen- 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company 

Of London and Edinburgh. 
Combined Assets Over 
Eighty-Seven Millions. 
To the Public and Our Patrons : 

The North British will pay all fire 
losses just as soon as adjusted. Our of- 
fice for handling all loss claims is locat- 
ed in the Tribune building, northwest 
corner of Eighth and Franklin streets, 
Oakland. Our office for general fire busi- 
ness is at 2027 Sutter street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Tom C. Grant, General Aaent lot Pacific Department. W. J 
Nichols, General Adjuster. 



Fire 



Marine 



New Zealand Ins. Co. 

Auckland, N. Z. 

Cash Capital $1,250,000. 

Reserves $2,025,000. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders 



3 1 2 California St. 



San Francisco, Cal 



G. J. STOVEL 



Temporary headquarters 



Bacon Building 



Oakland 



Phone Oakland 987. 



Our clients and friends are requested to 
renew their policies and bring in notices 
of loss to the above address. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total assets ' 5.813.619 

Surplus to Policy Holder. 2.729.173 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Paclflc 
Department, 525 13th St., Oakland. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent. 

Bekins Van and Storage 

Cut rate Shippers 

Telephone Us 

W. and J. SLOANE & GO. 

Now Located at 

Van Ness and Sutter Streets, - San Francisco 



• 



SAN HI 






l.f l!P\> 

that th 

toretl. 

• • * 

Oakland, with pro 

nple, has fur more rrim ■ 
mii San Pram \» •■. with 
i- many inhabi- 
tants. It is not thai Oaklandera 
an' mora inclined !•■ < ritm- than 
San Franciscans, but iliat lln- 
Oakland police forte is incompe- 
tent. The daily list of burglar- 
lea in that city is appalling. They 
have become bo frequent that the 
• have not room to give 
tlirin the space that they di 

There were seven crimes reported 
cm Sunday night, ranging from 
petty larceny to highway robbery 
—and ii"i an arrest The lack 
of detection is direct encourage- 
ment to the thugs, who have 
come t" look upon Oakland as a 
place of easy loot. Crime is far 
equeni in l>"tli Berkeley 
ami Alameda, in both of which 
towns an occasional arrest is 
made. 

* * * 

There are plenty of people 
who dislike motor-Cycles, with 
their rapid-lire explosions. Their 
riders will make tliein still more 
unpopular if they do not comply 
with the law as regards lights. 
On Sunday night (here were, on 
(he road hetween Alameda and 
San Leandro, at least half a 
dozen of these machines chug- 
ping along without, lights, en- 
dangering the lives of pedes- 
trians and other riders. 

Looking down the San Lean- 
dro road at night, one would be 
justified in thinking that a 
torchlight procession were com- 
ma-, so thick are the automobiles. 
Lights flare as far as the eye can 
see, and dozens of machines dash 
by, filled with gay riders. The 
towns along this road profit 
"reatly on this account, it beinsr 
a favorite diversion to drive out 
for dinner — and sometimes for 
less substantial but more exhila- 
rating things. But as a rule, th? 
autoists are an orderly crowd, 
out for the fun of the ride. 



Preachers against vice 

will hereafter cite Pittsburg in- 
stead of Sodom and Oomorrah as 
a terrible example. 



The Thaw ease is gradu- 
ally working around to Dollars 
vs. Justice. 



California Insurance Company 



Of S«n Francnco 



II id Office i.uior Juno I 



230 California St.. S.F. 



Time (or ifiving notice of loss or filing proofs wilt be extended 
on request. Our adjusters will make up proofs of all losses 
adjusted without expense to claimants. 

M. A. NEWELL. President. 
CEO. W. BROOKS. Secretary. 



AMERICAN CENTRAL INSURANCE CO. 
SAINT PAUL F. 8 M. INSURANCE CO. 
MERCANTILE F. 8 M. INSURANCE CO. 
LLOYDS PLATE GLASS INSURANCE CO. 

San Francisco City Business Office Removed to 

1Q1Q QIITTPR CTDC CT between fillmore and 

I /I/ oU I I C f\ olrvCCl, WEBSTER STREETS 

All Losses Adjusted at the Oakland Office 

Telegraph Avenue and 20th Street 

1150 SAN FRANCISCO LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID TO DATE 

Christensen, Edwards 8 Goodwin, Managers 



Scottish Union and National Ins. Go. The Home Insurance Co., New York 



Of Edinburgh, Scotland 



Capital 
Gross Cash Assets 



-$3,000,000 
$21,239,052.82 



Established 1824 

Capital. $30,000,000 



r $45,000,000 



Temporary offices, 468 Eleventh Street, Bacon 
Block, Oakland, Cal. 



Pacific Department 

NORWICH UNION. FIRE INSURANCE 



SOCIETY 



of Norwich, England 



314 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



San Francisco 



California 



Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets. $539,642.26 

Pacific Coast Casualty Go. 

of California. 



Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, 
Elevators. Workmen's Collective, Vessels, Bur- 
glary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green. President; John 
C Coleman. Vice-President; P. A. Zane, Secre- 
tary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deer- 

"oirectors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward 
L. Brayton, John C .Coleman, F. P. Deering, 
E F Green. I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. 
Pope, Henry Hosenfeld. Adoiph A. Son, William 

Temporary office. 2324 Clay St., San Francisco. 

Marshal A. Frank Company, General Agents 

for California. ^^ BuildInR gan Franolsco . 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and 
temporary sojourners anywhere in United 
States, Canada and Mexico, insurance agatnsl 

loss by li'r, lightning, wind Storm <>r tornado. 

[ndemnrty for loss of rental income by Are or 

lightning. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent, 

GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 

Temporary office, 466 Tenth St., Oakland. 



E. H. TICKLE 



B. SAVART 



TICKLE & CO. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 
TINTING 



Temporary Addre 

886 Sixty-first Street, 



Oakland, Cal. 



Paper of Every Description 

A. ZELLERBAGH & SONS 
405 Jackson St., San Francisco. 



514 Eleventh St. Oakland 
114 K St. Sacramento 



113 N. Los Angeles St. L. A. 
54 First St. Portland, Or. 



Absolutely the Rest French Laundry Work 

AT MODERATE PRICES 



E. CANDEVAN, 
1925 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone West 1901 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1906 



BANKING 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

"With which is amalgamated the Bank of 
British Columbia. 

HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, $4,500,000 
Aggregate Resources, over $9S,000,000 
HON. GEO. A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER, General Manager; Alex. 

Laird. Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, 
Cran brook. Fernfe, Greenwood, Kam loops, 
Ladysmith, Nana! mo, Nelson, New West- 
minster, Penticton, Princeton, Vancouver 
and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White 

Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and 
Skaguay (Alaska.) 

Also 110 other branches covering the princi- 
pal points in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba 

and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of Eng- 
land, the Bank of Scotland, Lloyds' Bank, 
Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National 

Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commer- 
cial National Bank. 

San Francisco Office— 325 California Street. 
A. Kains, Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Assist- 
ant Manager. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000 
Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 
Reserve Fund. $1,200,000 

HEAD OFFICE 40 Threadneedle St., Lon- 
don, E. C. 

Agents — New York — Agency of the London, 
Paris and American Bank, Limited, No. 10 
Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris — Messrs. Lazard 
Freres Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonler. Draw 
direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEP.AI'M, Manager; H. S. 
GREEN, Sub-Manager; R. ALTSCHUL, Cash- 
ier. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building ai 710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 300.000 

Surplus 32C.000 

Deposits. January 1, 1!>06 10.213.801 

James D. Phelan. President; S. G. Murphy. 
Vice-President; James A. Hooper, Vlce-Presid 
ent; George A. Story, Cashier; C. B. Hobson, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy. 
John A. Hooper. James MofTHt. Frank J. Sul- 
livan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels. Jas. 
M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on ap- 
proval securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, 
Farpo & Co., or exchange on city banks. 

Security Savings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 500.000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 280,000 

Banking by mail a specialty 

Directors— William Babcock, S. L. Abbott, 
O. D. Baldwin, Jos. D. Grant, E. J. McCut- 
chen. L. F. Monteagle, R. H. Pease. -Warren 
D. Clark, James L. Flood, J. A. Donohoe, John 
Parrott, Jacob Stern. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. 

Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed. $3,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $700,000 
The bank transacts a general banking busi- 
ness, sells drafts, makes telegraphic transfers, 
and issues letters of credit available through- 
out the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buvs and sells exchange and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILENT 1 1 A L, 

Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., Corner Sutter. 

Assets C5.500.O00 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1.750.000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administra- 
tor, Guardian or Trustee. Check a founts 
solicited. Legal depository for money in Pro- 
bate court proceedings. Interest paid on Sav- 
ings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per annum. 



(GottlktiiHa Cams©™ 

Tin' season of the wilted col- 
lar ami the pajama suit is on in 
full force in Gotham. There is 
liulr new or startling in the field 
of r l hespis' votaries, and it is to 
theatrical l'orkopolis \\v must 

look for the sensation of the I ' 

— Porkopolis galvanized into life 
by Montana gold. 

;;: * * 

There will be no theatrical 
droughi in ( Ihicago after Will •'. 
Block reaches the Jungle. This 
manager has resolved to give the 
Windy City its fill of drama if it 
costs him every cent of M. S. 
Largey'e corpulent fortune. Up 
ami down our main artery of 
travel Block hopped, skipped and 
jumped, annexing actors, sin I- 
ding yellow currency and per- 
spiration simultaneously, making 
change with one hand and sign- 
ing contracts with the other, all 
of which preparations were bul 
the forerunners of a busy time 
ahead in Packington's theatri- 
cals. 

A carload of players, a press 
agent, a bookkeeper and a per- 
sonal troiiser-crcaser will accom- 
pany Block on his flight West. 
Will A. Page, master of the 
mimeograph, was engaged at the 
last moment to issue bulletins 
along the route anil lo keep (he 
press of til i .— broad, nolile land in- 
formed of Block's efforts i" es- 
tablish himself as the Charles 
Frohinan of the West, and Lar- 
gev. the Montana mining man. 
as the barrel thai never runs dry, 

The cargo of actors shipped 

to-day constitute the casl of a 
play entitled " The Daughters oi 

Men." \ dense. 1m pellet ruble 

silence represents Block's policy 

regarding this play, and it is evi- 
dent thai he intends to creep up 

behind Chicaeo — after the ac- 
cepted hold-up fashion — and deal 
the metropolis of the West a 
.-tinging well on the head with a 
dramatic surprise. 

In two weeks, " The Daugh- 
ters of Men " will be an ailed 
reality at one of the ( Ihicago 
I lo -;i l res. M.eanwbile. " Told in 
tin' Hills.'" another of Block's 

enterprises, is running along 
smoothly at Towers' 'theatre, 
and next month the abused 
"'('inning Thro' the Rye" will he 
resuscitated and placed mi exhi- 
bition at the Illinois Theatre. 

Block's entrv into serious 
drama is something of a surprise, 
hut he has merely begun his cru- 
sade. His suit case is short on 
shirts and long on manuscripts, 
both commodities guaranteed to 
wear well. 



BANKING 



The French Savings Bank 



Montgomery and Market Sts., San Francisco. 

Capital Paid-up. $600,000. 
Chaiks Carpy, President; Arthur Legallet, 
Vice-President: Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary. 

Directors — Dr. J. E. Artigues, O. Bozio, Leon 
Bocqueraz, J. A. Beige rot. Charles Carpy. E. 
J. de Sabla. Jr., J. M. Dupas, J. S. Godeau. 
.1. J. Mack, Leon Kauffman, A. Legallet, Geo. 
Beleney. 



Member Stock 

and Bond Exchange. 

J. C. Wilson 

BROKER 

STOCKS and BONDS. INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 
Telephone Temporary 815 KOHL BUILDING 



New York — Phone Call 3177 Broad. 

E, F, Hutton & Co., Bankers 

Members New York Stock Exchange, New 
York Coffee Exchange, New York Cotton 
Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade. 
33-35 New St., Branch 647 Fifth 
Ave., NEW YORK. 
PRIVATE WIRE. 
Richard E. Mulcahy, Manager. 
490 California Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
424 Tenth Street Oakland, Cal. 



Fire Insurance Losses 



Will soon be paid. If the money is not 
needed (or immediate use in rebuilding, 
buying furniture, or replenishing stock.il can 
be profitably invested with the 

Continental Building and Loan Association 

at 5 and 6 per cent interest, the Associa- 
tion, however, reserving the right to limit the 
amount of any individual deposit. 

Offices; Cor. Marketand Church Sts. 

OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Dr. Washington Dodge. 

President 



William Corbin, 
Sec. and Gen'l Mgr 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $2,552,719.61 

Capital Actuallv Paid-up in Cash 1.000.000.00 

Deposits June 30, 1906 $38,476,520.22 

F. Tillmann, Jr., President; Daniel Meyer. First Vice President: 

Emil Rohte, Second Vice President: A. H. R. Schmidt. Cashier; 

William Herrmann, asst Cashier; George Tourny, Secretary; A.H 

Muller, assl. Secretary; W. S. Goodfellow, General Attorney. 

Directors—F. Tillmann, Jr"; Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Sleinhart. I N. Walter. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen. E. T. 
Kruse, W. S. Goodfellow. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and commission merchants 
General Agents 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

(Standard Portland Cement.) 

OCEANIC DOCK 

Also temporary office 1112 Broadway, 

Oakland. 












G. Lederer 



THE HAIR STORE- 



is now located at 1271 CALIFORNIA ST 



l-Uif-dmanc. Sfameco*. V* 1*1. Toupe*. 



GERMEA 

FOR 

RREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE COMPANY, AGENTS 






O. F. Willey 
Company 



Estab- 
lished 
1855 



Have re-opened at 

19 Fell Street, 

Near Market Street, 
San Francisco Tel. Special 336 



165-167 13th St. 

Bet. Madison and Jackson Sts. 
Oakland Tel. Oakland 8062 



With a full line of 



Surreys, Runabouts, Etc. 



COME AND SEE 



: p.T- 

inilor- 

l\l:l« A I'llllll- 

(tcr. nm 

us tin, .ir the pnli- 

- ,- 

■ mi. and which 
have ninth' 
sional rioj:, >•• 

'I he Hi in ! i- iirrim . 
thf entire lime next >'-:is"ii at 
1 thentro, in 

Philadelphia. Ix-ginning with tlic 
Nr« Year, h is their intention 
in organize .i strong Btoek com- 
pany with which, from January 
1 iu June 1 they will make ten 
new nroductiona of original 
plays. The liisi six plays have 
slrcadi been selected, and in- 
clude: " 'I he Round L T p," by 
Edmund Dav: "A Marriage of 
Re ison," by Hartlej Manners ; 
"( loggles and Gasoline," adapted 
from the German : " The Ener- 
getic Mr. West," by Edgar Sel- 
wyn : ii new farce by John .1. Mc- 
Nallv, and " Peaches," by Geo. 
V. Hobart. After these plays 
have liml their run. four original 
musical comedies and operas will 
be presented in succession, the 
b'tles of which will be announced 
later. 

The above list of authors is 
mil calculated to fill the aspiring 
luil obscure dramatist with much 
hope, lint Klaw & Erlanger do 
mil say they will not be eager to 
lake a "ooil play from any one 
who writes ii. Dndouhtedly they 
will bo. The great advantage of 
the scheme lies in the fact that 
it will give authors an opportu- 
nity to learn the exact merits of 
their nieces, which they could not 
secure in any other way excepi 
through an expensive production, 
Under the new plan of conduct- 
ing the Chestnut street theatre, 
a piece will have just the same 
production as it would have if it 
were specially done with the view 
of a long run, without the risk 
that would otherwise attach tn it, 
and without the inconvenience to 
the hooking department of hav- 
ing to hold a route which the 
merit of the piece, when placed 
unon the stage, might not war- 
rant being Riled. 

The public, too, will benefit, 
for it will not be obliged to en- 
dure long and forced runs of en- 
tirely worthless pieces in order 
that the expense of the original 
production may be defrayed, in 
part, at least. It is an excellent 
plan, reflecting great credit on 



THE FLETGHER MUSIC METHOD 

Simplei and Kindergarten 

TAUGHT AT 

THE FIETCHER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
2251 Clinton III, Phone Alameda 1264 

IL1NE0A 

Thai iv*t*m plant the trudr of muit no a truly ptycho- 
InpcaJ and educational !>*■*. hence the drud«ery it rhreun- 
aled. and ihe pupil* develop naturally and artistically. 
learning lo eipre»* ihem*eivr«, not merely lo be copyiitj. 

Thf Fletcher Muic Method ha. completely revolution- 
ized ihe old iy»ten» of teaching muaic to children. 

Residence 2251 Clinton Avenue 
Alameda, Cal. 



La Grande Laundry 

Of San Frandaco 

is now located at 
234 12th St., San Francisco, Cal. 



EAT 



Moraghan's Oyster House 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

Now open at 1212 Golden Gate Avenue. 

You know our oysters. Wholesale and 

retail. 
A messenger always in attendance for immediate 
delivery of Oysters in bottles, Oyster Cocktails. 
Oyster, Chicken or Squab Loaves. 
6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 



Dr. Geo. J. Bucknall 



Office and Residence 



1121 Laguna St. 



San Francisco 



Emmons Draying and 

Safe Moving Company 

Wreckers, General Contractors 

318 Market Street also 1060 Broadway 

San Francisco Oakland 

The most complete outfit in San Francisco 

Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 

SUPPLIES DYNAMOS 

MOTORS REPAIRS 

Century Electric Construction Co. 
18 Fell St.., near Market. San Francisco 

Hiram W. Johnson 

Attorney-at-Law 

Has removed his office to 1905 
Webster Street, corner Pine, San 
Francisco. 



3». 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 28, 1905 



its promoters, and it will un- 
doubtedly benefit the American 

anthor, 

* * * 

Some of the letters being re- 
ceived liv friends from FranK 
Daniels, now touring Europe 
wiili Mrs. Daniels in the come- 
dian's personally conducted ob- 
servation car, ring with the 
whimseys of some of the actor's 
droll stage speeches; ride this ex- 
cerpt from his last note to his 
manager : 

■■ Fur the one best bet in 
1 1; ■■■: ful liars, give me the New 
York steamship agent who gol 
me to sail on the boat that 
brought me over. When he was 
divorcing me from a lot of real 
monev for our tickets, he swore 
his boat was a ' six-er!' In the 
fog of the early morning of our 
eighteoJatSi! day .out, when the 
old wherry had thrown three 
sixes, we were hailed iii the of- 
fing at Queenstown. ' What ship 
is that?' sings out through a fun- 
nel a mugflrv party fmi i a dis- 
tance. • It's the So-and-So 
savs our skipper. 'When' from?' 
asks the funnel party. ' New 
York.' says our captain. ' When 
ilid you leave?' asks the funnel 
nerson. ' Mai 13th,' says our 
skipper. " May 13th of what 
year?' asks the funnel. It was a 
long trin. but I remembered my 

copy book exercise at sel i. 

• Satan finds work for idle hand- 
to do.' and devoted six whole 
days of my imprisonment in 
learning the words of (hat song 
in 'Sergeant Brue 3 that I could 
never always remember. I guess 

I'll be letter |ierl'eet ill it llexl 
season. When our boat bucked 

the wharf at Q nstown, 1 

found 1 knew the last word of 

ever'' cither line." 

A pari of Daniels's plans dur- 
ing his tour includes a visit to 
Persia for color sugeestions Effl 
"Omar." the comic opera wilt 

which he is lo succeed " Sergeani 

Brue," 

* * * 

The railroad trust problems in 
all their phases of rebates am! 
imposition are near to solution. 

The air ship is to be the agent of 
the reform, ami to the doughty 
(i. Bernard Shaw is credited the 
prophecy. The dramatist made 
an ascension in London last week 
— "oing up two mill's — and 
snendiny from 3.20 in the after- 
noon to 6.10 sailing about. Rob- 
ert Loraine, who has been visit- 
ins the author in London, ac- 
companied him on the trin. 
Others who went up on the trip 
were Mrs. Hugh Cholinondcley, 



Santa Cruz 

Welcomes all who desire a comfortable and entertaining place 
for themselves or families. 



NEVER. A DULL MOMENT 



TEe Tallac 



Lake Tahoe, Col. 

The numerous small lakes and streams adjacen 
ma Ice this resort 

Headquarters for Rod Fishermen 

San Franciscans are especially invited to write for 
terms for their families. 

M. LAWRENCE &. CO., Tallac. 



Del Monte Offers 

During the reconstruction of San Francisco, 
Hotel Del Monte ofters a welcome shelter 
to those desiring a homelike place 
for rest and recreation. The park- 
like grounds, the golf links, the flowers, the 
many walks and drives were never more at- 
tractive than at present. The entire hotel has 
recently been renovated and improved; with 
steam heat, electric lights, hot and cold water, 
telephone in every room. Why not make this 
attractive resort near San Francisco your per- 
manent home? Special terms for families. Ad- 
dress Geo. P. Snell, Manager, Del Monte, Cal. 

A Permanent* Home. 

S K A G G S 

^HOT SPRINGS, SONOMA COUNTY^* 

Only four and a half hours from San Francisco. As to the desirahili* 
ty of place I refer to any guest of the past I I years. Information at i 
Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St.. or of J. F. MULGREW. j 
Slcasfls, Cal. 

Klamath Hot Springs 

Klamath Hot Springs is one of the choice places 
in the State for rest, pleasure and comfort. Fish- 
ing is first-class. Rates $2 and $2.50 per day; ap- 
ply for informational the Peck-Judah Co., 414 
Fourteenth St., Oakland; or Edson Bros., Bes- 
wick, Gal. 

Hillside Villa 

Novate, Marin County. 

Good Room and Board One Dollar Per Day. 
Fishing and bathing. Driving, Horse-back rid- 
ing. Six trains daily. Fare 70 cents. Monthly 
tickets, 25 cents Round Trip. Address MRS. 
FARISH, Novato, Marin county. 

LAKE COUNTY 

Trip to Lake County by WM. SPIERS- 
SPRING STAGES, more comfortable than car- 
riages. From San Francisco to Anderson, Har- 
bin Springs, and return. $7. To Adams. Seig- 
lers, Hobergs. Howard. Astorg and Glenbrook 
and return, $9. Stages leave Calistoga 11:30 
a. m. Sundays excepted. One-half hour for 
lunch at the new Calistoga Hotel. Fifty pounds 
baggage allowed with each ticket. Tickets on 
sale at Southern Pacific Offices. 



Union Lumber 
Company 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER 

Railroad Ties, Telegraph Poles, Sblngles, 

Split Shakes, Etc. Main Office, 206-207-208 

Crocker Bldg. Telephone Private Ex. 624. 

Yards and Planing Mills 

Sixth and Channel Streets, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

About Your Trip East 

When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall I go?" 
Let me offer a suggestion. The Missouri 
Pacific operates both Pullman and Tourist 
Sleepers through from California to Kansas 
City, St. Louis and Chicago without change 
of cars, which carry you through the world 
famed scenery of Colorado by daylight. 
Dining and cafe cars on all through trains, 
service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and hand 
somely illustrated books of travel. 



W. J. SHOTWELL, General Agent. 
1070 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAL. 



THE F. THOMAS PARISIAN 
DYEING & CLEANING WORKS 

Cleansing Dainty Garments our Specialty 

Our new monthly contract for gentlemen 
— 1 suit a week cleaned and pressed in- 
cluding small repairs 

$1.50 PER MONTH 

We clean ladies' and gentlemen's auto- 
mobile suits to perfection and return in 
24 hours if brought to 

1158 McAllister Street 

Oakland Office-Broadway- 1 1 64 



MANZANITA HALL, Palo Alto, Gal. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Every Incentive to work and right living. Ideal 
dormitory system. One teacher to every five 
hoys. Modern languages under foreign teachers. 
A new cinder track for th* coming year. Pre- 
pares more especially for Stanford or Yale ancJ 
other Eastern institutions. Catalogue on re- 
quest, l l Hi ven r. 

J. L.EROY DIXON. Principal. 












City Abstract Co., Inc. 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS 
69 City Hall Avenue 



Will renume I'uy : .'-out June S. 

IWfi. Bank rvnownls will l>o Riven Iminp- 
dlatf* i»tt«'t li.-n 



-ALSO- 



Fin- Iiuunu I ions .lcslring In- 

formation as to record title of property 
1 by Insnrnn- <■ can be furnished 
same promptly ami on special terms. 



Dr. H. J. Stewart 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Putnoforte, Organ. Harmony and Composition. 
Special course for fingers desiring church ap- 
pointments. 

STUDIO 1925 OCTAVIA ST., 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom 

Tailor 

2415 Fillmore Street,, San Francisco 

Formerly of the Mutual Savings Bank Building. 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

Get the Habit 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marvel at the results. The "Argus" has 
many eyes, you only two, so let us do the work for you. Send 
five dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spengler, Director 

352 Third Ave. - - - New York City 



THE CALIFORNIA DOOR COMPANY 

DOORS— WINDOWS 

16th Street Station, Oakland 



i 

• ■ 

ii thorn 

I 

"Hit the M'- ■ of Ins yai lit, 

" 'I he Moonstoi 

ilmlll tin August, 

iiinl hin. I in Ww York. via 
steamer from Liverpool, about 
three weeks Intel . Besides n sun 
cost of mahogani . the actor wil! 
bring home with him a nrw pet. 
n common _ 

-. picked up woefully thin 
but surprisingly cheery, from :i 
hit of wreckage in the Mc 

IMIIIMII. 

* * * 

Blanche Hing last week paid 
duty on three new gowns ordered 
from London and Paris for use 
in her forthcoming tour in 
"Dolly Dollars." 

Henry Blossom read " The 
Red Mill " to Fred Stone hist 
week. David Montgomery, 
abroad sight-seeing, is said to 
have hut the thinnesl idea of the 
nature of the piece in which he 
and Stone are t" star, beginning 
in September. Stone save he will 
know every part in the play be- 
fore Montgomery can set hack to 
New York. 



The Corona has a brave 

and able master in the person of 
Captain Glelow. A crowd of 
union sailors approached his boat 
the other day while it was in 
Oakland harbor ready to sail. 
The union men wanted a palaver 
with the crew, but the captain 
nourished a revolver, and the 
men ran like scared dogs. Hur- 
rah for the captain — may his 
gun never lack powder. 

Savings hanks have been 

established for the Filipinos. To 
the casual observer, Ihe situation 
is well illustrated by the story of 
the Irishman who was asked why 
he did no! buy a trunk. " For 
what?" lie asked. "Why, to put 
your clothes in," was the reply. 
"And me go naked?" asked Pat. 



An Italian woman of 

Oakland demands the arrest of a 
man who eloped with her daugh- 
ter, then added insult to injury 
by coming hack and stealing $25. 
"Me daughter and me ducats!" 



Cook With Gas 

lo 

Cheer Ihe Home 

Bake the Bread 

And Roast Ihe Meats 

That Make Ihe Man 

Fuel Gas at 90 cents. 

Oakland Cas, Light and Heat Company 

1 3lii ltd Clir Streets. Oakland 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

San Francisco 
PAPER 

Temporary Office: 419 11TH STREET 

OAKLAND, CAL. 



FIRE-PROOF 

BURLAP 

For Tacking on Walls 

Wall Paper 

UHL BROS., 7 1 7 Market St 

Doing Business at the Old Stand 



CARNEGIE BRICK AND POTTERY COMPANY 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile 

Fire Clay, Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, 

Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile 
Fire-Prcofing, Semi-Dry Pressed Brick, 
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe, Brick and Tile 
Mantels, Flue Linings, Urns and Vases, 
Flower Pots. All kinds of Vitrified Salt- 
Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tesla, Alameda County, Cat 

Yards: San Francisco, Oakland. Berkeley, San Jose. 

Office, 10th and Division Sts., 

San Francisco 



The Waldorf 

Hair Store Branch 

3461 Sacramento Street. 
SWITCHES, WIGS AND HAIR ORNA- 
MENTS. 
Phone West 5606. 

JohnH. Ware 

Notary Public, Commissioner of Deeds, 1936 
Fillmore Street, San Francisco, Cat. Telephone 
West 6098. At Western National Bank from 2 
to 3 p. m. 

DR. H. I. JONES 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, late Starr King 
building, will resume practice at his residence. 
228 East Sixteenth St..Oakland. Phone East 82 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1906 



Question of Definition. 

Raymond Hikheock, the 
comedian, who will resume hi^ 
touT in Richard Barding Davis' 
iiierrv fnivc " 'I lie Gallopei . 
tells the following story of one 
of the members of a company 
with which he was playing in the 
early days of his stage career. 
One evening while they were 

making up X was very 

happy, grinning, hummine; and 
whistling, until one of the boys 
asked him what he'd had. 

" \Vli-- didn't vim see the 

Evening B . with S 's 

criticism of last nighfs perform- 
ance?" 

" No." 

" Hi' calls me a model actor in 
the part." 

" I don't call that much of a 
compliment." 

'■ IM like to know whv not." 

" Just look that word ' model ' 
nn in the dictionary," was the 
advice. 

lli' diil. and this is what he 
read: "Model — A small pattern; 
a miniature of something on a 
larger scale." 

.1 Question of Accommodation. 

Senator Hoar used to tell the 
story of an incident he witnessed 
on a Boston street ear. It was 
alum! eleven o'clock p. m., the 
mystic hour when all law-abiding 
Bostonians lose their thirsts. 
'Ihe Senator happened to notice 
a man running after the ear ami 
vainly tried to attract the con- 
ductor's attention. The Senator 
notified tho conductor, who 
stopped tho car. The belated 
passenger, who was somewhai 
under the influence of liquor, had 
no sooner climbed aboard than 
ho delivered himself of the fol- 
lowing remarks: "Shay, M»T 
Conductor, does thish mad ran 
to 'commodate the passengers, oj 
the passengers ran to 'commodat 
the road?" — Warper's WeeMy. 

* * * 

No Siren. 

Mr. City Boarder was being 
entertained by his rural sweet- 
heart. " Do von plav and sing 
' \\ Inn the Cows are in the 
Corn?' Miss Milkyweigh?" 
" Lord bless you, no!" she ejacu- 
lated. " I gel the dogs and chase 
'em out." — Harper's WeeMy. 

* * * 

Burning hove. 

"Ah. you are the light of nay 
life." "And you are my steady 
flame." It was a match. — Spec- 
tator. 



We Recommend 

GEORGE MAYER.LE 

German Expert Optician, now at 1115 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. His Optical 
Skill, knowledge and many years of practical experience are powerful factors to his great 
success. Mayerle's Eye Water 50 cts., by mail 65 cts. Mayerle's Antiseptic Wipers to be 
used when glasses blur, tire or strain the eyes, 2 for 25 cents. Eyes examined free. 



if % 

( VACATION 1906. ) 



ISSUED BY THE 

California Northwestern Railway 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 
AND 

North Shore Railroad 

THE SCEHIC ROUTE 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 

Giving full information in regard to 

Camping spots, the location, accommodations, attractions, etc.ol mineral 
spring resorts and country homes and farms where summer hoarders 
are taken, with terms of hoard, S 7.00 and upwards per week. 

To be had at Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street, San Francisco. Inquiry by mail will 
bring an immediate response. 






JAMES ACLER, 

General Manager. 



R. X. RYAN 
Gen. Pass, and Freight. Agt. 



J 



A Full Stock of 



^ 



V 



Chipped and Ground Glass 

At 1818 1-2 POST STREET 
Pacific Window Glass Co. 



j> 



BACIGALUPI 



New Buon Gusto 
Restaurant 

1017-1019 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

Ravioli every day 



Real Estate Company 

John Partridge, President 
759 Fillmore Street San Francisco 



BREVITY IS THE SOUL OF WIT." 
GOOD WIFE! YOU NEED 

SAPOLIO 



WH\T S\N IKW hi u nv\ K» s| \KI \M1II 




California street, lookintr oast from Brnderick. 




Meson street, near Devisadero. 



-Reproduced by courtesy of the Overland iinnthhi June-July Numher, 




NEWS HeTTER 

(California XobjcvUsicr. 




VOL. LXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., August 4, 1906 



No. 5 



FBAXriSili NEWS LETTER \NI> CALIFORNIA 
AI'VKI! 

n marl.- 

N.w y..rk ' formation ma) be obtained regard- 

bog nibscrlpl kdvertlalng)— 20C Broadway. C C. Murphy. 

ntntiv.-. Lonilon i '111- •- 30 •'..rnhlll. E. C, England, G 
Str.'.>t I 
All m mining, commercial and (lnan- 

;-, .-riis- in.ins or .,iii.! matter Intended foi 
In Hi.- .urr.nl number ..f the NEWS LETTER AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER I to the A 

office not later than Thursday morning. 



; striking 



bi 



Capital iiiul labor are talking of 

gain i" deal in votes nexl November. 

, Now thai we are to have labeled canned meat, why 

not label freak politicians and religionists? 

California Democrats are wearing a smile which 

illicit mean that they have something up their sleeves. 

No. tin ■ Armour meat trust and the armor-steel 

trust are not "tie and tin: samo. but ai a distance they look 
alike 

Composite pictures of shon ".iris blaze the way to 

tin- sub-cellar of crime. This is not a sermon, but let it 
go at that. 

When correspondence schools teach correspondence, 

the News Letter will give "Vox Populi," "Subscriber" 
ami the others a chance. 

The ice-man, fleas, mosquitoes — still it is com- 

Eorting to remember that Pharoah had troubles of his own 
with swear-conducing pests. 

Black as Pittsburg's coal dust smoke is, it seem- 
like white, fleecv clouds beside the social smut that is 
just now pouring out of the millionaire set. 

The ice trust is "beneficently assimilating" all tin 

ready money of the community — in the East, of course. 
The Lord regulates all such matters in California. 

It is mean of them to announce that the apricot 

crop in California has failed, and raise the price of Mis- 
souri canned peaches wearing the brand of the real thing. 

Debs is heart sick. He says with labor unions sad- 
dled with the Republican party and the Democrats saddled 
with Bryan he can see no hope for patriots of his brand. 

Thaw's San Francisco chums should be hieing 

themselves westward pretty soon, if they propose to re- 
sume business at the Emeryville race track crime factory. 

John Sharp Williams, leader of the Democratic 

si.l.- of Congress, notifies Bryan that ho must give up 
public ownership if he expects to do business with his 
party. 

Schmitz is trying to do the goody-goody loop the 

loop act to amuse the people, but he forgets that while 
standing on his head, tell-tale things might roll out of 
his pockets. 

Major Dreyfus has the Legion of Honor decora- 
tion, and 'the fellows who persecuted him are wearing 
penitentiary or social outcast badges. Verily virtue has 
its reward. 



Pardee finds thai Bomc "in- has been piling lo 

alk-ovor. 

Tin- administration is at Oysl i Ba . bnl many 

a lobster finds its way to the oyster's wal 

\l is the pity thai it is a Yale instead of a 

Chicago university professor who Bays (he Monroe Doc- 
trine is the crowning iniquity of the CTnited States. 

Vaccine matter made of powder ami lead is a sure 

preventative of disloyalty, tin- Czar thinks, Inn it so hap- 
pens someti s thai the doctor has to take bis own 

medicine. 

So long as the Russian revolutionists carry the 

red Hag in one band ami a lire brand in (be other, decenl 
people will rejoice every time tin- CzarV artillery is 

toll, bed off. 

John I). Rockefeller protests that be has not 

active in Standard Oil affairs lor a dozen years other than 

calling upon the cashier for bis little quarterly wad of 
$10,000,000. 

The programme of the I'opubliean Congressional 

campaign provides for tariff doses to suit the districts. 
"' Stand by the party and ask for what you want" is to 
lie I he way. 

The public — all parties — should quit trying to 

force Schmitz into the Gubernatorial chair. There are 
some temptations that even so great, a man as Ruef's man 
Friday cannot resist eternally. 

After a two months' strike, the Vienna master 

builders have "ielded to the demand of the workers and 
accepted a scale of $1.05 a day. After all, America is a 
pretty e; 1 place for carpenters. 

All the cabinet officers have battleships for pleasure 

cruising except Taft. But he is trimming the sails of 
another kind of craft called Ship of State, and of course 
he must do the one gallus simplicity act. 

From January 1 to June 31 the fire loss in this 

country, including San Francisco, averaged $2,000,000 a 
day. ami barring San Francisco, the premiums were am- 
ple to pay in full and leave a good margin. 

Objections are being filed by the daddies of the 

Republican party against Roosevelt's idea that it is the 
•' President's party," but a little thing like that does 
not cause a ripple to chase itself across Oyster Bay. 

A noted pedagogue urges that anti-graft be added 

to the regular course of study. The San Francisco City 
Hall gang speaks for the job of supplying object lessons 
and dark lantern sketches of how leg-pulling in real life 
is worked. 

With not the slightest intention of reflecting upon 

our .great President, the boy-terrible was not far wrong 
when lie said there "is some things God cannot do," and 
one of them is to make Teddy's mouth bigger without 
setting his ears back. 

In railroad parlance, "the operating, maintenance 

and general expenses" of the Republican campaign to 
control the next Congress include a lot of items that the 
least the public know about the more faith they will have 
in the sacredness of the ballot-box. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 190(i 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Adver- 
tiser has removed its business office from 1121 Laguna 
to 721 Market street, where the management is ready to 
welcome Us friends.. The News Letter is proud of the fact 
that it is among the pioneers in returning to the burned 
district, and it will grow with the others and work with 
the others to the upbuilding of the greatest city in the 
world. 



JEFFERSON'S MONETARY SYSTEM. 

Mr. Bryan's effort to gravitate toward Jeffersonian 
Democracy is altogether commendable, but he should not 
tarry too long at the grave of the 16 to 1 fallacy, nor 
lament too loudly over the public ownership mirage. The 
demonetization of silver was one of the most heroic and 
sublime acts of the Government in all its "tinkering" 
with the money question, but the profound wisdom and 
foresight which put silver where it belonged came from 
the Democratic party in 1852, when the subsidiary silver 
coins were reduced by t per cent below the commercial 
value of the metal. When in 1872 the Republican party 
demonetized silver dollars, it boasted of having accom- 
plished a wonderful thing for the nation's monetary sys- 
tem, but, in fact, only about 8,000,000 silver dollars had 
been coined since the first mint was established, and not 
1,000 of them were in circulation. Moreover, it was the 
Democratic party that repealed in 1893 the Republican 
silver bullion purchase act of 1890, which act was the 
direct cause of the panic which raged so disastrously dur- 
ing Cleveland's second administration. 

It was the Republican party that invented and put in 
operation the greenback monetary system, out of whose 
insane and unsound science of money creation the Popu- 
list and Greenback party emerged. . It was the Democratic 
party — Cleveland's second administration — that issued and 
sold $200,000,000 of bonds to maintain the nation upon 
the gold basis, which Harrison's administration had almost 
wrecked. Thus at no time in its history has the Demo- 
cratic party stood for a circulating money system that 
was not based on gold as the metal of ultimate redemp- 
tion, until Bryan. Bland and Altgeld injected the free 
and unlimited coinage of silver into the Chicago platform 
in 1896, and it would not have been done then hail the 
convention not been packed with Populists and Green- 
backers, who were elected delegates by false pretenses. 
Bryan nor any other free coinage man could be a Demo- 
crat and advocate either the Chicago or Kansas City plat- 
forms. If, then, Mr. Bryan is gravitating toward Jeffer- 
sonian Democracy, he is gravitating as a new convert 
and not as a prodigal returning to his father's house. 

Mr. Bryan announces that he has not changed his opin- 
ion as to bimetalism, but he admits there has been a 
change in the condition. Bimetalism as Mr. Bryan in- 
terprets the meaning of the word, is a contradiction. We 
have and have always had bimetalism. We make coins of 
gold, silver, copper and nickel, but there is but one 
standard of measure of value, which is gold. There could 
not be a double standard any more than there could be 
two yard sticks of different lengths. Silver nor copper 
nor nickel has an intrinsic coinage value, but an extrinsic 
value is conferred upon them by giving them a legal 
tender value which is fixed and measured by gold, but 
not by gold as coins, but by its bullion value, which, as 
such, is the recognized standard measure of ultimate re- 
demption, as well as the value itself. Men of Mr. 
Bryan's school of money creation fail to see that it is not 
the stamp of the Government upon a coin that makes it 
a legal tender. The stamp guarantees its fineness only, 
while the disc shape of the metal is merely for conven- 
ience. A ten dollar gold coin is not a legal tender for 
debt unless it weighs 258 grains — the stamp guaranteeing 



that it is 900 fine — hence at its last analysis the standard 
of value is such by its weight and not by its size or form. 
This means that the commercial and coinage value of 
the metal must be identically the same. But silver or any 
other metal of little or no commercial value, or paper, may 
be used, and are used, at their face value if the holder 
has the option of exchanging them for gold on demand. 
It is the option, then, and not the actual value of the 
material, that gives them dignity and importance as 
money on a parity with gold — gold being the only known 
metal that possesses of itself an inherent intrinsic value 
for the basis of a sound monetary system. 

Now it is this system of money creation that Jefferson 
and Jackson advocated. AVith such a system the Govern- 
ment may issue as many kinds of money, as to its mater- 
ials, as it likes, for each and every kind is based upon gold 
that is 900 fine, and weighs a specific number of grains 
to the dollar. The Bryan school of the science of Gov- 
ernment teaches that the volume of coin shall be equal 
to the demand for it, but the very reverse of this is true. 
That to which all forms of circulating money mediums 
looks to for ultimate redemption, economists of all coun- 
tries say, must stand limited in quantity against unlimited 
demands. It is this good old Jeffersonian monetary 
Bystem that enables the people of the United States to 
transact an annual volume of business aggregating more 
than two hundred billion dollars on an ultimate redemp- 
tion volume of gold aggregating less than two billion 
dollars. 



ROCKEFELLER'S RETURN. 

" I am full of the joy of mere living." The nice bald- 
headed old gentleman delivered himself of this delicate 
little epigram on landing at the New York pier. And, 
by the same token, he thereby dispelled an illusion. The 
public has come to look upon him as a man burdened with 
wealth and years, embryonic as a philanthropist because 
of inability to dispose of surplus wealth garnered by re- 
peated piratical raids. They looked upon him as a feudal 
lord, an unhappy old tyrant, unhappv because he had too 
much of this world's goods. The public is wrong again. 
The old gentleman with the skull cap is " full of the joy 
of mere living!" Now, isn't that sweet? Doesn't it go , 
to prove that a man may buy legislatures, evade the laws, 
ruin competitors, run Sunday schools, and yet be happy? 

This should be a comfort to all our plutocrats. They 
should take heart of grace and go right on in their gar- 
nering of the world's wealth. A New York physician ex- 
plains the Rockefeller condition on purely materialistic 
hypothesis. He says that " joy " and " mere living " cost 
a temperate and water-drinking, God-fearing Christian 
nothing, or next to nothing, and hence the Rockefeller 
glee. Besides, Russell Sage is gone, and the cheap " joy 
of mere living," while the Standard goes merrily on 
gathering the millions, may now be enjoyed by old Rocky 
all by his lonesome. 

Besides enjoying golfing at Compiegne and dodging 
French reporters, Rockefeller has been gathering fossils. 
It is supposed that the radical professors at the Chicago 
University are to be dropped from the salary lists, and 
that the collection of fossils is to take their place. As 
yet no other reason has been assigned for the fossil gather- 
ing mania indulged in at Compiegne by the Master of 
Standard Oil. 



what do tttlse things mean? 

"To be an infallible guide, the Bible must be able to 
instruct in all things pertaining to life and godliness. 
Such instruction, to be competent, must reveal the eternal 
purpose of God concerning this earth and its inhabitants. 
This purpose being a fixed one, God's omniscience must 
foresee and declare those events which are to affect the 
destiny of His people. To believe otherwise would belittle 






I \ VDYKKTI." 



r, and make II im unworthy 
'■ the Bible, we 

r which tin 

the burning of Ihi ;>lant pub; 

at Mountain \ 
• • • 

That day will be "the day of tl, wrath." in 

which " Be shall make a speedy riddance of all them that 
dwell in the land." Zeph. 1:1 

The total destruction of this splendid plant, nol 

- junk, lends us to believe this 
was a visitation, a singular manifestation of the wrath of 
an 01 lod. 

This perfect printing plant was the glory of Mountain 
View, anil "the beauty of California's excellency." Hei 
great presses, her splendid bindery, her splendid buildings 
and spacious grounds ried with the printing plants of the 
stricken metropolis, and the religions sect back of tli ■ 
•• Pacific Press " swelled " like Babylon's king of old," and 
said : 

" I- not this great Pacific Press, which we have built 
by the might of our power for the honor of our name?" 
forgetting God, who ruleth over kingdoms of men. 

And in their pride they were humbled, Glory be i 
in the Highest, and stricken into the dust. Amen. 



TOO MUCH RUEF. 



A disquieting rumor gains currency that Abraham 
Ruef, political boss of San Francisco, has at length found 
an entry into the realm of State politics. By one of those 
strange turns of the political whirligig, Governor Pardee 
is said to be willing to give a place on the Board of Har- 
bor Commissioners in exchange for the strength of the 
boss in the San Francisco delegation to the Bepublican 
State Convention. 

The rumor goes even farther than this, and proclaims 
Ruef as the future head of the Board of Harbor Commis- 
sioners, and from there to make a slide for the United 
States Senate. It must always be remembered that these 
political advancements are only mile-stones in the boss's 
ambition. His ultimate destination, as per his private 
programme, via the Harbor Board, via the United States 
Senate, via any old thing, via 630 Jackson, or any similar 
institution, is head of the law department of the Southern 
Pacific Company. His ambitions soar no higher, and to 
reach this position he would barter a seat in the United 
States Senate, and all that it means in the way of power. 
He looks with green-eyed envy upon Herrin, and that gen- 
tleman's responsibilities and power, and he wants that 
gentleman's scalp. 

History began on April 18th for Mayor Schmitz, and 
mayhap April 18th marks the reincarnation, also, of 
his mentor and shadow. Perhaps, too, Ruef is tired of 
the gentlemen ( ?) he has heretofore associated with, and 
he, too, is anxious to place his feet under corporation 
mahogany, alongside those of "Gene I" 

Let it not be thought that exception is taken to Ruef 
because of his alleged badness. Just as bad men have 
held positions on the Harbor Board. Johnnie Mackenzie 
is no angel. "Worse men than Ruef are in the Senate. And 
when it comes to dictating his emplacement as legal lumin- 
ary for the Harriman interests from the vantage ground 
of the plutocratic boudoir, at Washington, Harriman and 
his stockholders will scurry around letting contracts for 
armor plate trousers' pockets provided with time locks, 
and then carefully lose all memory of the combination. 
No; Ruef is probably not quite so bad as he is painted 
or imagined. There is every probability that he does not 
have to sleep o' nights between heavy steel plates, to take 
out the crook that is in him, but there is this about this 



'•' offiYin'. guardian of the city's 

iwn in hoi 

■ ilifornia by 
furnishing Abraham Ruef with an ente: 



AS I CHECK. 



the political ambitions of the Labor Onion 
-. the National Citizens In. I, -■>, iation is 

submitting to political candidates throughout the country 
two questions : 

•• Have von pledged your Bupp labor trust or 

to any ether trust, organisation or corporation seeking 

on?" 

Will you or will you not represent tli .19 a 

whole, and seek to protect them from class legislation, 

whethi organized labor when stun 

legislation is "in the interests of the few to give power over 

the many?" 

The plan provides that the names of candidates whe 
stand for labor or capital trust- shall be supplied to the 
different citizens 1 associations now organized in over 500 
towns and cities in order that citizens of all parties, who 
are opposed to class legislation and organized trust methods 
clang to control legislation can vote for anti-trust 
candidates at the coming elections. 

The Citizens propose to support public men of either 
party who stand free from pledges to any organization. 
They refer to the effort of the labor lenders to secure the 
passage of an anti-injunction bill as a direct step towards 
anarchy and an effort to take away the power of the 
courts and transfer it to the labor trust or a capital trust, 
whichever might choose to revenge itself on workingmen. 
To strip the courts of power to restrain organizations from 
attacking men or property would place citizens and com- 
munities in jeopardy, from any organization either of 
labor or capital which might choose to use violence. 
Labor in its proposed attacks upon other workmen and 
property; Capital if it should see fit to hire men to attack- 
union workmen. 

This movement of citizens is based upon the theory of 
Government that the community must protect its mem- 
bers from control of the people by any organization, class 
or trust. 



TEE JAPANESE. 



The Examiner is working energetically to bring about 
a race war, and that other newspaper degenerate, the' 
Bulletin, is lending a helping hand. The Japanese have 
offended by purchasing what was offered at a higher price 
than a white man would pay for the same article. The 
Jap is clearly not to blame, while' the white man has the 
same right, providing he can produce the cash. 

The Bulletin and the Examiner are not anxious to 
help the dispossessed tenants. The only element that en- 
ters into consideration when these two scavengers run 
together is the desire to raise hell and sell newspapers. 
The hue and cry against landlord and tenant is simply 
ridiculous. That murder has not already been committed 
is not the fault of these two garbage mongers. 



France knows a whole lot. The court that fixed 

up Dreyfus and put him on the top shelf ordered the 
Government to publish the verdict in fifty newspapers 
of Dreyfus's selection and pay the bill. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 190G 



.annas 

1 am going to be a candidate 

And spend my money free, 
And shake hands with a lot of folks, 

1 never want to see. 
I am going to be insulted 

Ami placed upon the rack. 
But if 1 am elected 

1 will pay the public back. 

President Roosevelt, Speaker Cannon, Chairman Sher- 
man of the Congressional Campaign Committee, and 
oiher pariy leaders, bad a protracted conference at Oyster 
Bay some days ago to arrange plans to | m 1 1 the wool over 

the eyes of the rank and Jile in the mailer of the tariff 
question. .Most of the gentlemen present weiv standpat- 
ters, but the ni'ws from Massachusetts, Iowa, South Da- 
kota, and, in fact, from pretty much all over the trans- 
Mississippi country, rather surprised those who stand for 
the Dingley tariff as it is. The sentiment is .dominant 
in all parties in the west that the Government musi adopt 
a policy of tariff revision ami reciprocal trade relations 
with all foreign countries. A number of Republican 

State conventions have already declared for a radical 
change in existing customs. " We want wider trade rela- 
tions," is the en thai is heard at Oyster May. 

Strangel] enough, Massachusetts is taking the loud 
for revision. The I'aet is. the existing tariff gives to the 
protected industries more than $300,000,000 a year over 
and above a reasonable profit. This the West is beginning 
to understand, ami also it is seeing that it is paying mosi 
of the hill. It sees that mill, packing-house ami nearly 

all other products of American industries are sold i h 

cheaper in foreign lauds than in this country, and it sees 
only unfair dealing ami rank favoritism in it all. 

* * * 
The sentiment that a fellow feeling makes us won- 
ilerous kind is illustrated in a recent band-shaking hoe 

over tin- hi 1\ chasm of political hatred. The Kansas 

Democrats and the South Dakota Republicans declared 
for the direct primary and the referendum, ami (he 
Slate of .Maine. Republican, is going to declare for the 
same things. The idea of the direct primary is to break 
up local boss rule ami "nomination is the equivalent of 
election." As everybody knows, the referendum is in- 
tended to make legislation a matter id' direct concern of 
the people. But new things have been tried very often, 

and always, sooner or later, the hoss bobs up and the 

law-makers do pretty much as they please. The people 
soon tire of much political responsibility. But the "rail- 
road pass" is the blackest of all scare-crows jusl now. 

Both parties are riding the hobby. Churchill is making 

the anti-pass question a State issue in New Hampshire. 

and il arly every Slate "free rides" and "political 

passes" are the theme of the spell-binders. And the joke 
of it is. public officials in several Stnios declare they will 
resign before surrendering the glorious privilege of be- 
ing "close up" in railroad circles. Still, the people want 
a fresh " ism." and most likely everybody will have to put 

up cold cash for transportation in the near future — for 
a while. 

Si! * * 

It is to be observed that the Republican leaders are be- 
ginning already to have doubts about the political com- 
plexion of the next Congress, and the word has gone 
down the line that a majority, no matter how small, must 
be secured at all hazard. It is conceded that [owa, South 

Dakota ami perhaps Wisconsin and Massachusetts, will 
have lo he put in the doubtful column for the Presidential 
year if tiny are not carried by a substantial majority 
this fall. Senator La Toilette of Wisconsin is squarely 
opposed to Roosevelt, and anything lie might or would do. 
IT is palm for Presidential honors itches all the way to his 



shoulders, and it would be just like him to see his State 
default on his party rather than he kept on a back seal 
to increase Tail's chances. In no State are the party 
I'm lions so bitter as in Wisconsin, but for the next four 
years, at least, La Eollette will have full control of the 

machine. 

The indications are just now that the Democrats will 
make substantial gains in several of the Republican States 
this tall on the tariff issue, and on the almost $1,000,- 
oon. oho appropriations of the last session of Congress. 
Then Roosevelfs persistency in trying to force Taft on 
the parly as Presidential candidate will help the Demo- 
crats in New York and Ohio, for in both of these States 
anti-Taft organizations are already under way. In New 

York it is composed of the personal and political enemies 

of the President, led by Piatt, Odell and Trigg. In Ohio 

il is engineered by Senator Poraker ami the old Cox ring. 

The; Maine Taft for selling them out at the last State 
election, when a Democrat was elected Governor. Illinois 
is just HOW booming Cannon, and there is a feeling of 
resentment against both Roosevelt and Taft for trying to 

side-track the State's favorite son. 

* * * 

There is considerable feeling against certain California 
Congressmen because they were lacking in influence or 

were indifferent when San Francisco asked to have the 
duly takn oil' of lumber, structural iron and steel and 
olhcr highly-protected building materials. It is held 

against them, loo. that had they underst 1 their husines< 

Secretary Taft would have sent the appropriation of 
$2,500,000 for the lire sufferers in cash instead of in army 
cations. But what they will he obliged i<> explain to their 

hurl or their good is why they did not lix tilings so that 
the navy department WOUld not go hack on eight hours for 
a day's work. For ibis bit of negligence labor is up in 

arms, for the Secretary of the Navy now rules dial the 
eight hour law does not apply where battleships and other 
Government work is being done by contract. The first 
ruling was that ii applied lo all work for the Government, 
whether In- the Government or in, contract under Govern- 

ni supervision, for ihe reversing of the ruling, Con- 

gressmeo «ho represent districts in which Government 
work is being done lo contractors who require ten hours 

of labor for a da\ aie heme blamed, and however unjust 
Ihe accusation may be. it is not likely to do them any 

good at the polls. 

* * * 

/ 'rili Hi ill I'ii /i Suckers. 
Tin' dele. ii of Pardee in Mendocino was on the scale of 

two lo one, and was accomplished in the face of the 

promises by the office holders in Mendocino that they 

would give him the vote of thai county at Santa Cruz. 
1 1 is unfortunately 'be case lhat California has never 



r 



V 



The Hub 

CHAS. KEILUS & CO. 

Exclusive 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No branch stores — no agents 

When you consider quality for quality, style 
for style, price for price, workmanship and fit, 
our smart clothes stand out beyond all others 
for chic and reliable wear. 

Our increasing trade it simply evidence lhat is whispered 
by correct dresser* who post one another of the kind of 
clothes you act in this shop without bothering with 
bungling needle-pushers. 

KING SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, Near Sutter, 

San Francisco. 



"% 



J 






AM- i M II (A \l'\ ERTISER. 



had n QoTcmoi iblo tn ran It 

- 

will be recalled, put his Mend, l»r. Lawlor, in 
the Home •>( tin- Feeble Minded, nn<l cau« 
■Inl tli.ii Lawloi _ii under a cloud, ill. 

financial end of which 1ms never been lifted, though h 
mother job, I believe. Another Inn 
ppointed. against nil the law in the cat 
charge of the Insane Asylum at Napa, and there hat 
an eni - andats as a result What ha; 

-uiii. where there was a wholesale escape, and al 
San Quentin, which was turned into a gubernatorial fur- 
niture factory, every one knows. Mendocino was turned 
into another asylum for political dependents ami the 
political game was played openly at tin' other public in- 
stitutions, including the Blind Asylum in Oakland. When 
Pardee came in. he made no changes except in the Board 
of Managers, plan's which were distributed always with a 
view tn the renomination of His Excellency. On the 
water front, Charlie Spear ruled supreme, ami as a con- 
sequence tin' Spear family, direct and collateral, as 
as by marriage, have hail everything in Bighl from the 
apple carts ami news-stands tn the presidency of the 
board. Even now it is rumored in political circles thai 
the reason that no successor to Johnnie MjacKenzie as 
Harbor Commissioner has been named is because the plat 
is to he offered to Ruef in exchange for votes at the con- 
vention, ami talks of a ileal with the Salt Francisco boss 
are io he heard on every Bide. The result of this policy, 
of course, has been extravagance and had management, 
and it is a notable fact that the only places where there 
has been no trouble is where the old regime was let alone, 
and. as at the Stockton asylum, not interfered with. 

In Mendocino County, the Asylum authorities have 
always done politics. Born as the result of a political 
trade, it has ever remained a political institution. The 
whole county was divided into two factions, of which the 
superintendent of the asylum and a local lawyer were the 
i wo leaders, and no appointment was ever made for any 
office which did not have political significance. The ap- 
pointees were expected to work and labor for the success 
of the Governor, and true to that promise, they got out 
this year for the Governor, and were badly beaten. An 
ordinary defeat would have meant very little, but the de- 
feat was so great that it was significant of the feeling 
among the people over the State, and as a result, it has 
naturally carried terror to the Pardee camp, although 
Charlie Spear says he expected it. 

If Pardee is conceded the votes of Alameda and Sacra- 
mento, he still lacks two hundred by about twenty-five, 
and he needs 226 to secure a renomination. The counties 
that he has carried are largely Democratic, and even Sac- 
ramento would give her vote for Bell as against Pardee, 
if the former Congressman from the Second should be 
nominated this year. More than that, while the politi- 
cians of Sacramento are for Judge Hart first and Charley 
Curry second and Pardee third, the press is not sup- 
porting him with any enthusiasm, and the Bee, which is 
boosting him the most at present, would support Bell if 
the latter were named for Governor. 

While every one concedes that Alameda will he for 
Pardee, there are all kinds of alarming rumors this week 
that the delegation will not be as enthusiastic for him as 
it might be, and that the judgeship questicm will figure 
more in the Gubernatorial situation than the friends ol: 
Pardee would like. The fact is, however, that the Sena- 
torship question is really cutting far more of a figure 
than many persons suppose. Perkins says that he is 
keeping hi's hands out of the State ticket. He says that, 
as a Senator, he will give loyal support to whatever ticket 
is nominated at Santa Cruz, but that he cannot take a 
hand in the nominations. The fact of the matter, how- 



• renominated and 
nor will light i 
•>( the appointment of Elliot! a- United State* \l 
which bitterly opposed, and considers little 

short of a personal insult. Charlie Spear and 
Hatton, the political managers of Pardee and Perkins, 
to) friendly. At Santa Cruz, two yean ago. - 
i have helped Hatton with -.me rotes of water fronl 
employees, who were delegates to the convention, ami 

whom Halt. .I, i led to help him in his highly gpectacu- 

lai campaign for tin- election ,,f Henry Oxnard to the 

United States Senate Spear did not deliver the £ i 

ami the two nun have never I n very friendly since. 

!'•■ sides ■ ipposition "i Perkins, Pardee ha- al 

home the opposition of the faction headed by Soeretan 

Metcalf. who accuses the Governor ol having made prom- 
ises to him four years ago. when he was nominated, which 

he dill not keep. This row. it will he recalled, cam I 

mtv conspicuously in the fight over the Berkeley post- 
office. 1'aidee wanted editor Richardson, of the Gazette, 
and so diii Congressman Knowland, until Metcalf, purely 
oul hi' opposition to Pardee, opposed Richardson ami sup- 
ported Schmitz, the incumbent, who was reappointed. 
Perkins stood in with Metcarf in thai matter, because 

Otherwise the appointment could never have I n made. 

and would never have been confirmed by the Senate. 
Richardson has since come out in an eulogistic diatribe of 

Knowlanil. who turned him down, but Metcalf has not 

pronounced any eulogj of Pardee. Any federal office- 
holder will l.ll von thai the Secretary would be glad to 
<ee the Governor defeated lor (he renomination. If there 
are any doubts, ask Collector Stratton. who is conspicu- 
ously absent at present, and wdio is absolutely under the 
iontrol of Perkins: ask John Lynch, another office-holder, 
who would he glad to please Perkins; ask Elliott, the new 
.Marshall ; note in this connection that all the federal 
office-holders, who are doing nothing, are Perkins's ap- 
pointments, or he retained them in office, and remember 
that a policy of idleness in polities is not characteristic 
of them in the past. It is not by words that we judge 
men in politics, but bv deeds, and judged by the standard 
of deeds, does any observer of the political situation fail 
to realize that Perkins, Metcalf and Knowland's are all 
really opposed to the renomination of Pardee ? The 
friends of the Governor should realize that fact, and 
make preparations to overcome the secret as well as the 
open opposition, if they want him nominated. Alameda 
County is by no means safe for the Governor if he wants 
a trading delegation, as it is called, from his home county. 



E. G. HELLER, formerly of Heller & 
Frank now at 1884 Fillmore Street, near 
Bush under the firm name of 

E. C. HELLER 8 COMPANY, 



Ciothiei 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 




HearfbeCncrlHboOxdcrilariViour 
Oof dial will play the devil.sir, Wltijvu 



It's going up, it's .going up, 

Although we thought it went; 
It still keeps climhing, climbing 

Its rocky, steep ascent ; 
And we in awe perspiring 

Just wonder where we're at, 
Foi still the rents keep going up, 

And other things like that. 

The price of labor rises high 

With every changing day, 
To get your lease you may be spry, 

Still it will get away ; 
You exercise your intellect, 

You think you're on the scent, 
But you are fooled if you expect 

To keep up with the rent. 

It's going up, it's going up, 

It's rising everywhere, 
And so's the price of labor 

In a way to make you swear. 
And when you seek insurance 

That is positively due, 
You find your policy's gone up 

With rents and labor, too. 

If Governor Pardee wants the vote of Marin 

County, he should lose no time in instructing his friend, 
Commissioner Spear, to so arrange matters that persons 
from that portion of the State, when they land at the 
ferry building, shall not be forced to walk through stabler 
and over manure piles to get to the street. The condition 
of the north end of the ferry building is filthy in the ex- 
treme, and ladies cannot get either on or off the North 
Shore and Tiburon ferries without soiling and ruining 
their gowns. It is said to be one of Commissioner Spear's 
.'.hemes, bv the way, to exclude the Marin County ferries 
:Trom the ferry building, though what benefit any of his 
relatives are expected to receive from the change I have 
not yet discovered, and personal and family emoluments are 
apparently the mainsprings of his administration of 
office. 

The notorious Dr. Chamley, cancer specialist, who 

was arrested in San Francisco in connection with the 
death of one of his patients, is advertising for a physician 
to assist him in his nefarious work. " Fine appearing, 
white-haired but active doctor wanted," he announces. 
Some nice, dear, clean old man, who can smile hypocriti- 
cally, stroke his snowy beard, and inspire the gullable 
women who call with perfect confidence in him. Dear 
old grandpa wouldn't hurt them. He will simply per- 
suade them that they have cancer, and gravely say that 
it will cost several hundred dollars to cure them — and 
maybe they will die under his treatment. But as long 
as he gets their money he will earn the $200 or $300 a 
month that Chamley promises him. 

Dr. E. T. Devine was given a farewell banquet at 

the St. Francis on Tuesday evening. It was a beautiful af- 
fair — delicious menu, fine service. A loving-cup — not 
presented by the refugees — was given Dr. Devine. The 
report that the leavings of the feast were distributed 
in the refugee camps is untrue; it was feared that it 
would give them the gout. 



Decent people are hoping that the papers will soon 

get through publishing pictures of Evelyn Nesbit Thaw. 
Not a day has passed since the shooting that she has not 
been put beiore the public in various stages of dress and 
undress. Children want to know who she is, and parents 
have a hard time explaining. The whole episode has been 
a flaunting of vice in the face of the public — an open-air 
washing of very dirty linen. Young people who should 
not know of such things as are told of in connection with 
this case are made familiar with vice in its most putrid 
form. Ella Wheeler Wilcox, by telling what she knows 
of bestial nassions, and Clara Morris, by giving details of 
an assault upon her virtue, have helped the work along. 
There is talk of introducing the newspapers in the public 
schools. The Hearst kind should be confined to pest- 
houses. 

-Six years in the penitentiary is the sentence meted 



out to Chas. Bock, secretary of the Sailors' Union of Port- 
land. The sentence was imposed by Judge Charles Gan- 
tenbein, of the Circuit Court. It takes a Federal Judge 
to deal with these thugs. Let's all hope that Bock will 
be put to hard labor — something that he has not performed 
for years. And while he sweats in his stripes, working for 
the State, he may reflect tearfully on the days when the 
deluded sailors worked for him. 

The question of the legitimacy of the relief to 

the tune of twenty thousand dollars to the Hahnemann 
Hospital is apparently not difficult to solve. If the loan 
was made on the ground that it was conducted for benevo- 
lent and charitable purposes, as is stated, there is no rea- 
son why relief should not also be extended to the many 
excellent Catholic and Protestant institutions existing for 
the same purposes which have met with losses and are in 
difficulties. 

We have reached the limit at last in this relief 

work business. A poor woman with four children has been 
refused supplies because her requisition was not type- 
written. The recording angel thereupon made a note that 
the hottest place be reserved for this idiotic official in the 
red-tape portion of Hell — district San. Francisco Relief. 

There certainly appears to be considerable reason 

in the claims of the grocerymen for compensation for the 

voluntary handing over of their supplies I'm- relief pur- 
poses. There is. however, so much "pull" in the whole 
relief business that simple justice has very little chance. 



SHREVE 

& Company 

have on sale their 
usual complete stock 
of DIAMOND and 
COLD JEWELRY, 
WATCHES, SIL- 
VERWARE.GLASS- 
WARE, STATION- 
ERY, E T C, at 

Post Street and 
Grant Avenue, and 
at 2429 Jackson 
St., SAN FRANCI SCO 

Prompt and careful attention 
given to correspondence. . . 






\\"l' 









mi 

ill \i«ur divnnis shall < aim an< 
And > "ii -hall follow whore he 
Through dusk-deep w.hm|- and hlotumim meads, 

I 
l.iml i>iil for you by fairy hands, 

round with red-coned lama 
Foui 

With lovely avenues whose shade 
race and eglantine is made, 
With oread ferns in shady sp 
Ami shoals of blue forget-me-i 
With rows of crimson hollyhocks, 
Ami columbine, and spicy stocks, 
Ami other, fairer blossoms, known 

oik of childlike heart alone — 
The yellow lily, whoso romance 
Grew no! 'Hi any field of France, 
One white, ethereal immortelle 
From those lost woods we loved so well, 
Ami that Blue Rose whose petals gleam 
So richly by the paths of dream. 
o Baby, lit your wee hands keep 
Some Bowers when von come back from sleep! 
— Fraw "Dream Verses and Others." 



IN THE ATELIER. 

I thought that love was such a little thing! 

That oik- might keep it always at his Bide, 

Scabbarded like a sword, at peace to hide 

Its need in times of dearth and clamoring. 

I had it there, but unrememboring 

T put it off one day. that I might glide 

A freer hand across the work that cried 

One consummating touch. It rose. Took wing. 

And now 'tis gone. There lie the broken rames 

Of what with toil and care and crooning song 

I sweated over, strong in sweet belief, 

In dauntless hope. Oh. leave me! Low the flames 

Are nickering. . . . This life is not so long. 

A hiding while within the house of grief! 

— James E. Richardson in Everybody's Magazine. 




'Wernicke 

"EDVSTKTCABINET 

SYSTEM 



Includes every office filing device worth having, made in the most 
practical manner to facilitate the daily transaction of business. 

It includes vertical file [horizontal or upright sections! card index, 
bill, document, letter, cap, legal blank, commercial report, check files, 
etc.; in all about fifty diflerent sections built on the Stoba^Vcrmcltc 
plan of'Elastic" Construction. 

We have ordered a train load from Cincinnati as well as extra 
salesmen from headquarters and are fully prepared to handle all 
orders promptly. 



H.S.Crocker Co. 



Exclusive Agents, 
515 Market Street.. 



WONDERFUL TAHOE. 

The numerous small lakes in the immediate vicinity of 
Lake Tahoe are in easy access of the Tallac Hotel, which is 
reached after a most delightful trip on Lake Tahoe, ami 
many hundreds of happy people have scaled the heights of 
-Mount Tallac, or reveled in the beauty of Tahoe's watery- 
stretches this season. The scenery is indescribably beautiful 
— grander contrasts cannot be found in the Alps or in 
any other mountainous region in the world. The scenery 
is incomparable, and nowhere is this so manifest as in the 
deep indigo of Lake Tahoe with its liquid crystal ripples, 
waves tipped with the steel of polished lances, or the 
green shallows, with their cool shadows. 

There are many smaller lakes within easy reach, 
among these are "Fallen Leaf," and "Cascade." Those a re 
famed fishing spots. They can be reached over good roads by 
team or horseback, or, by the more hardy on foot, as they 
are all within easy distance of the Tallac, where the ac- 
commodation is first class. The service is excellent. There 



is an elegant Casino, four howling alleys, a large verandah 
surrounds it on all sides, which is twenty feet wide and two 
hundred feet long. The Casino is situated right on the 
edge of beautiful Tahoe, ami on the land side the eye 
plunges into the deplhs of a dense forest, while toward the 
lake (he view is magnificent. From Tallac thirteen streams 
may be reached, where the sport of fly-fishing can be in- 
dulged in lo the heart's content. Great is Tahoe, but great- 
er, indeed, is the Tallac. 



C03I3I END. I BLE ENTERPRISE. 
In these strenuous times there is no linn in San Fran- 
cisco that has shown more enterprise in catering to the 
wants of the purchasing public than the White House. 
The latest innovation is the "Great Relief Sale," which 
will commence on Monday, August bth. The firm offers 
one thousand ladies' suits at $6.50 each, and two hundred 
tan covert box coats al $5 each. This sale is made at the 
cost price of the articles, and no alterations will be made. 
There is sure to be a great rush. 



1C 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 



Looked On 




.. ■ WH,.V.-"Jm.,),"^. 




When a handful of London tailors foregathered recently 
in Threadneedle street, that thoroughfare so sacred to 
their calling, and abused the American man for not fol- 
lowing the rules of dress they saw fit to impose on him, 
they little thought a rebellion possible under their very 
noses. A cable from London says that the Threadneedle 
Street Oligarchy has been defied in its own pocket bor- 
ough. The young dandy of the British metropolis abso- 
lutely refuses to wear that cross between a woman's gown 
and an army tent, known politely as the frock coat. It 
was in defense of this garment that the nine tailors of 
Threadneedle street hurled anathema on our democratic 
habit of wearing what pleased us. For the first time in 
modern sartorial history, Pall Mall has a suggestion of 
variety in male attire. The "cut-away " has the call at 
present, though there is a decided tendency towards the 
" sack." Heaven grant that the rebellion never stop till 
it plucks the tail feathers from the dress coat- 
As a corollary to our Butchertown scandal and the de- 
creased importation by Germany of the canned by- 
products of our stock-yards, the price of dog meat in 
Hamburg — where the steaks come from — has gone up. 
At first the Hamburgians were content to struggle along 
on horse-flesh. The fillip given to the price of this table 
delicacy, however, by the decreased importation of Ameri- 
can-made goods, brought it within the statute of limita- 
tions established by the pocket-book. The despatch saya 
the more savory dog sausages bring 15 pfennigs a pound. 
There is not a word said about legislation to put a date 
on the armor plate encasing the sausage. No doubt a 
hint about tracing missing license tags would set the 
whole community barking. 

John D. Rockefeller's early return to his own. his native 
land, the land he owns, despite the menace of that Ohio 
sheriff, was undoubtedly induced by the remarks of Pro- 
fessor Zueblin about the idiocy of our present marriage 
system. .John is fearful that the Qorkyizine of that sacred 
institution would reduce his revenue. It is a notable 
fact that those who take Gorky as a mode] in this country 
forswear the humble places where kerosene illuminates, 
and hie them to where the electric bulb rules supremo. 

Having discovered the economic basis for the oil king's 
haste, as well as his virtue, we venture the prophecy 
that a certain professor in the Chicago university will be 
open for an engagement very soon. 
* * * 

That favorite amusement of New York, trying to dis- 
cover how old is Ann, has been superceded by the puzzling 
question: "How old is an emotional actress with red hair 
and a son of twenty-six when she wishes to marry a man 
of thirty-two, after registering with the county clerk- 
that she is thirty." As an aid to the students of differen- 
tial calculus who undertake to unravel this mystery, it is 
given out that David Belasco was the lady's manager, and 
that among her private collection of naines may be found 
one, or is it two, that spell Leslie Carter. 

There is much ado in literary circles over George Ber- 
nard Shaw's balloon ascensions. Some fear that the will . 
Irishman will fall out and break his neck; others fear that 
he won't. For ourselves, we hold the opinion that in case 
of an accident, the author of " M/rs. Warren's Profession " 
will land safelv. There's a good deal of gas in him. Then, 




% Bljflp of #ur?llo0ttt 

Haberdashers 

for 

Gentlemen 

Hyman C& Lipman 

1449 FILLMORE STREET 
VAN NESS AVE. near BUSH STREET 



he has had considerable experience with balloons all his 
life. In a political sense, he is a Fabian aeronaut, which 
means that he does not have to start for any political point 
at any particular time, and is not due there or anywhere 
else till the following day. His favorite balloon and the 
one he uses most frequently is labeled "Advertisement." 




^NTty 




Baltimore R»e 

BOTTLED BY 

«m.Lanahan6Son. 

BALTIMORE' 



50 YEARS' 
TEST, STILL 
THE BEST 






' \ 



11 






can 

• • • 

* * • 

I" the - into which the tJniti 

; fjill.-n. The undi • 

m, the miserable, ramshackle buildings, the poorly 
maintained mforts and dangers to the 

patients, the wholly inadequate accommodations, the un- 
sanitary conditions, and the disgraceful situation 
whole were all referred to. Now things are worse. There 

imingly no effort on the par) of the auth 
in Washington to better conditions, which hare gone from 
bad to worse. An hour's visit by the erncial 

er will show what a doot hospital has been pro- 
vided for the great number of sick sailors who are an- 
nually treated at this place. Perhaps the firsi thing 

that strikes tl ye of the visitor is the stagnant pond 

dose to the hospital building. Tt is covered with green 
slime, it is surrounded with a low marsh, and its presence 

teelf a menace to the patients and attaches of the 
hospital. 

In spite of its poor accommodations, however, the 
Marine Hospital, or rather its few facilities, ma 
to do ;i splendid work of relief for the fire refugees during 
the days following tin- recenl disaster in this city. The 
hills around ir wi^v speedily thronged with thousands ol 
refugees, the number for several days being in the neigh- 
borhood of 20,000. The hospital attaches then did won- 
ders which have not been recorded in the daily press, 
which was seemingly too busy elsewhere to consider this 
out-of-the-way retreat. Dr. Alanson Weeks, the surgeon 
there at the time, quickly mustered his forces, comman- 






: 
that the tion-m, kfexicam and other* 

who have supplanted 

The idea of Furuseth 

a jud_ 

and to hear the English la ortured to deati 

bailors' Onion, over 
which the _|, r ,._ 

-idc?. \ _ - i.. hear him bellow about the 

i" \ of the new crews. If there is any 
crowd of incomp ! sea-lawyers in the world than 

those self -same "sailors" of the Sailors' T'nion. they 
would he hard to find. They have about as much idea 
of alacrity ami discipline a- a snail. A day's work with 
an equal number of Chine-.- . would pro 

a better boat or fire drill than the whole of Furn- 
* square-head " pack could exhibit in a life-time. \. 
any experienced native-born American shipmaster if this 
oner Puruseth's Scovi i i squelched 

the better it will be for the many clean, respectable 
American boys who would like to follow the sea. but are 
kept away by the foreigners whom Furuseth represents. 
* * * 

It is suggested thai if the lords and ladies of the 

old world do not quit lionizing Bryan he will have to be 
brought home on two ships, because of the weight of his 
egotism. 



it burst. 



-The Bryan boom is all ready for the bursting. Lei 



All kinds of interior repair work and furniture made to order 
as usual. UNITED CRAFTS AND ARTS, 147 Presidio Ave. 



r 



■> 



^ 



We White House 

N. W. COR. VAN NESS cAVE. and PINE ST. 

Special 

GREAT RELIEF SALE 

Commencing Monday, August 6, 1906 

ONE THOUSAND LADIES' SUITS AT $6.50 EACH 
200 TAN COVERT BOX COATS AT $5.00 EACH 

All Silk Lined 

ABSOLUTELY COST PRICE 

No Alterations 

Telephone Emergency 200 

Raphael Weill & Co., Inc. 



j 



li 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 




FINANCIAL 




In speaking of the death of Mr. Sage, 
Not Mean? Henry Clews, one of the oldest bankers 

in the financial district, said: "Mr. 
Sage's death removes the last of the old-time financial 
giants. 1 think his estate will measure up to $75,000,000, 
and may even go as high as $100,000,000. This will he 
found to be well and carefully invested, as for many war- 
he has been preparing for the end, and each war added to 
liis financial wisdom and sagacity. When his estate is 
probated, I think there will be an agreeable surprise. The 
idea that Mr. Sage was a mean man is erroneous. He was 
a very frugal man and laid the foundation of his for- 
tune by self-denial and laying by small amounts as seeds 
planted for future harvest. The habit of saving and 
careful use of small things continued to influence him all 
through life. When he gave, he gave without ostentation 
and usually through Mrs. Sap", who is one of the kindest 
ladies of the land. During the time following the San 
Francisco disaster, Mr. Sage contributed $5,000 to the 
relief fund. This surprised and pleased Wall street, as it 
was considered a very generous contribution as coming 
from him. That night I called at his house, which is 
next door to my own, and congratulated Mrs. Sage, whom 
I know well, on the amount subscribed. She was sur- 
prised that I should comment on the matter, and said : 
•I wish he had given $100,000.' I believe that while 
Mr. Sage, even during old age, still enjoyed accumulating 
money, he had a distinct idea in mind of some great 
work to be accomplished with a part of his fortune after 
his death, and that Mrs. Sage prompted and urged such 
work, and is now prepared and educated to accomplish if. 
Mr. Sage was a thorough American in every sense of 
the word. He was as careful in forming his opinion on 
political questions as on questions of finance, and his 
views on both questions were usually remarkably correct." 
* * * 

The London Times, in a recent is- 

Confidence in the sue. in answer to a correspondent. 
United States. delivers itself editorially on the 
subject of the muck-rake exposures 
in the Fnited States in the following language: 

" It would be a great mistake to suppose that every 
Englishman believes everything said by every newspaper. 
No sensible man believes that American business is rotten 
because some swindles have been exposed, any more than 
be thinks that all French business is rotten because there 
was a Panama scandal, or that all our own business is in 
the same condition because we have scandals from time 
to time and are aware of much that is wrong, though it 
may not yet have come in so striking a form before the 
world. 

" Strong language about scandal is not to be taken 
to show that even those who use it supnose the wdiole busi- 
ness world in the country where it occurs to be corrupt. 
It is not their aim or business to offer a careful judicial 
view of American business as a whole. Thev are concerned 
with the scandal alone, and the general perspective must 
be left for adjustment on some other occasion. 

"Americans may dismiss the idea, if they ever enter- 
tain it. that the people in this country regard them as 
all in the same boat with the Beef Trust. Standard Oil 
Company, dishonest railway managers, and people wb ) 
control yellow dog funds. There are Pharisees and fooi- 
ish individuals in all countries. We have some among us. 
and as they are generally very ready to talk, they prob- 



PENINSULA SUBURBAN HOMES 

Fine Residences, Bungalows, and Oak 
covered acreage property. 
Consult. CURRAN CLARK 

Real Estate Broker 2091 Fillmore Street, S. F. 



ably do some mischief, but the mass of the people under- 
stand very well that the mass of American people are 
\' t\ like themselves, and that in America, as here and 
elsewhere, society is held together only by the saving 
remnant of which our correspondent speaks — the quiet, 
inarticulate people who still believe in probity and honor 
and try t<> do their duty and fulfill their obligations 

honestly." 

* * * 

The San Francisco fire destroyed 
Steamer Day. much old and useless junk to which 
all San Franciscans were deeply at- 
tached. Useless, time-honored furniture was incinerated. 
Old chairs with holes where the cane seat should be. 
have been cried over as lost friends; sewing machines of 
the Balboan vintage, sofas that served for the incubation 
of myriad fleas, hair mattresses grown mouldv from disuse, 
and the thousand and one things that offend a norma! 
taste, but to wliich we cling with a tenacity equal to that 
nf a moribund African, were burned. It was hoped that 
the idiotic custom called "steamer day" had been dis- 
posed of with the rest of the useless refuse. It has sur- 
vived, and San Francisco is responsible for an infliction 
that does not exist in any other clime. There is no more 
sense in this idiotic practice at the present day than there 
would be in reverting to the use of the old wig-wag system 
uf telegraphy. "Steamer day" is time-worn, moth-eaten 
and stupid, and should be done away with by legislative 
enactment, if the public is too dense to arise and demand 
its immediate obliteration. 

The history of "collection day." the first of the month. 
should have began on the 18th of April. 1906, coincident 
with fbe re-incarnation of one Schrnitz. 



AT DEL MONTE. 

Miss Florence Whittell. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Hearst, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. .T. Tobin, Colonel and Mrs. Wm. Babcock. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Green, of San Francisco; Mrs. W. H. 
Fitzhugh Lee, of Virginia, and Mrs. F. Sloat. Mr. and 
Mrs. F. F. M. Eckert. of Alameda, figure among the many 
notables as guests at Del Monte this week. 



f. 



P. E. BOWLES 



E. W. WILSON 



^ 



AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 



DEPOSIT GROWTH 



Mar. 3, 


'02 


$ 387,728.70 


Sept. 15 


" 


1,374,983.43 


Mar. 15, 


'03 


2,232,582.94 


Sept. 15, 


" 


2,629,113.39 


Mar. 15, 


04 


3,586,912.31 


Sept. 15, 


" 


3,825,471.71 


Mar. 15, 


•05 


4,349,427.92 


Sept. 15, 


" 


4,938,629.05 


Mar. 15. 


'06 


5,998,431.52 


June 18, 


" 


6,650,555.88 



V 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BUILDING 

Francis Cutting, Geo. N. O'Brien 

Vice-President Cashier 



"J 






\ ' 






T£ Etihto ©IT tihus LWneiT IFte 

In the Newi I 

linni- 

-• ruble boon, maj 

- rvnuun iinlarnisli.il if the. n 
will only herd the li 
The demonstration at the Saint From 
the occasion of the dinner to Doctor Devinc ami manv 
other diagrarofi follow, n . 

by following the \ 
The mistake being made by the nun in charge of this 
money is that they assume they are the owners and not 
ians of the fund, and thai it is t<> be doled out to the 
camp dwell* and on each occasion as 

small a pit sible. 

The money and the relief stores belong to the tent and 
barrack tenants, and any disposition of the funds or the 
money providing for a return of the fund or any pari of it 
in payment of rent, or in payment for real estate or for 
stores is wrong, devilishly wrong. 

We repeal : 

•• Every penny contributed, less the mosi economical 
expense possible for distribution, should lie given outright 
to those who are in n 1. 

"It follows, then, that any scheme, proposition or plan 
a indirectly loan so much as a nickel or a loi 
bread to the indigent would be the equivalent of betraying 
the confidence of the donors, which in turn might well 
be culled the most despicable game of confidence that 
was ever played upon human-Mid. Every donation be- 
longs, by every moral and legal right, to those for whom 
it was intended, and moreover, the logic of the transaction 
is, that the donations and opportunity to be self-sustaining 
should come out exactly even. Hence, any plan to oblige 
the participants in the fund to reimburse any one on 
earth for supplies or money received would be a transaction 
so revolting to true manhood that beside which the 
cruelty and lawlessness of a Chinese pirate would stand 
conspicuously commendable. And, again, those for whose 
benefit the great heart of the sympathetic donors went out 
in substantial help are to be consulted, and their wishes 
righteously, honestly and honorably considered. He is the 
lowest and vilest of wretches who would manipulate this 
fund for his own use and advantage. 



MAGAZINES AS AIDS TO LOYALTY. 
Sir Gilbert Parker raised the important question of the 
high rate of postage on English magazines during the 
Postal debate in the House of Commons. He objected 
especially to the high rate on magazines sent to Canada 
from England as compared with the small sum paid 
on magazines sent from the United States. This meant, 
in his opinion, the substitution of American for British 
literature in Canadian households. It could hardly fail to 
have some effect in the direction of devitalizing the loyalty 
of the Dominion, he said. 



The Vienna Cafe, under the management of Mr. P. 
B. Galindo, is fast becoming the most popular luncheon 
place in the city. Coffee and rolls and chocolate and 
dainty rolls are served every day during the shopping 
hours. The ladies are making the Vienna Bakery their 
daily meeting place, and the location at 1236 Post street 
makes, it most desirable and popular. 



Fire Insurance Companies Are Paying 

/', „,//, 
■ i, ,r< direct atU ntion to tl>< 
of our 

Certificates of Deposit 

which art payable on demand, transfer- 
rableby indorsement, not subject to at- 
tachment, and earning interest at varying 
rates depending on length of time money 
remains on deposit. 

For further information "/</'/.'/ at 
or Deposit Window. 

Insurance drafts cashed for. 
customers without charge. 

Loans granted to customers on sat- 
isfactory security. 

THE WESTERN NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Market, Powell and Eddi/ Sis. 
James Flood Bldg. 



THOS. COOK C& SON 

NOW LOCATED 

410 Fourteenth street, Oakland 



W. W. MONTAGUE & GO, 

Now ready 
for business. 

South West Corner 
TURK & POLK STS. 



Take Eddy St. car 
from the Ferry 




Palo Alto 



Pure Air 
Pure Water 



14 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 190G 



1» MS Ate ®f !F@sr®niqm Aff» 



Group of Toil Losing Ground. 

Almost, if not quite altogether^ Russia, might he called 
a gigantic mad-house. All sides seem to be bent on ex- 
tremes. Those railing themselves the Group of Toil in 
th • late dourna have become leaders of bands of outlaws, 
except the few who were imprisoned soon after the dissolu- 
tion of Parliament; and the revolution that was to be for 
the freedom of Russians lias already descended into un- 
organized associations for robbery. The Government has 
swung back into greater harshness than before, and bar- 
barism is in the saddle everywhere. But in his extreme 
and drastic policy to crush out lawlessness, the Czar un- 
questionably lias the moral support of the nations, though 
bis physical strength lies with the army and navy, which, 
as a whole, are still loyal to the throne, reports to the 
contrary notwithstanding. It was a masterly stroke 
of the Emperor to incorporate in his ukase in dis- 
solving the dourna an edict which commits the future 
of Russia into the hands of the tillers of the soil 
by arranging for a new Parliament, whose majority shall 
be composed of agrarians. Evidently this is already doing 
its perfect work, for il has not only stopped lawlessness in 
the rural districts, except sporadic outbreaks under anar- 
chist leaders, but it has' turned the liberals and (he con- 
stitutional democrats squarely to the side of the Govern- 
ment. The consequence of this may be seen in the practi- 
cal admission of the revolutionists that they are not suffi- 
ciently organized to cope with the Government, and in 
their announcement that they will not order a general 
strike of wage earners until sometime next autumn. 
Meanwhile, their cause will be further weakened by roving 
bands of robbers and incendiaries which the leaders are 
encouraging under the mistaken idea that such a course 
will cement all the discontents into one great body of men 
who can be relied upon to oppose the Governmeni in any 
event. 

It need not be said that the Group of Toil is back of it: 
all. nor that the Group is composed of socialists and anar- 
chists who have joined issues and made their cause com- 
mon, to the extenl of destroying the Government, for all 
that is not only apparent on its face, but Confirmed by 
their own declarations. Moreover, with the agrarians even 
partially pacified by the promise that they shall control the 

next Parliament and themselves adjust the land question, 
the centers of business and population will be inclined to 
remain passive until the new dourna lias a chance to do 
something. Perhaps the situation, since the agrarians 
have been promised so much, will be better imderstoo 
when it is said thai Russia is the most purely agricultural 
country in the world, and thai the percentage of farmers 
to the whole population is far greater than in any other 
country. But for the mosl part, their methods of tilling 

the soil is primitive to a surprising degree, which is a 

drawback, as it indicates an astonishing amount of illit- 
eracy. It is bad for Russia that industries are introduced 
under the protest of the agrarians, the more so because 
farming is the chief occupation, and that (he peasants 
constitute an enormous majority of the population. The 
depopulation of the rural districts and the increase of the 
population of the trade centers has always been discour- 
aged by the Government, so there has never been estab- 
lished a bond of sympathy and interdependence between ur- 
ban and the suburban people. And it is the tact that the 
Czar is largely relying upon this to make his scheme of a 
Parliament made up of farmers to crush the revolutionists 
of the cities a success. In creating antagonism between 
the centers and the rural folk, the Government has made 
no mistake, for a large majority of the leaders of the 
revolutionary party are foreigners — Germans. Hungarians 
and Austrians — as are a large number of the members 
of labor unions and socialist societies; besides, the rural 



folk swear by the State religion, and by the divine ap- 
pointment of the Romanoff family to rule them. In the 
end, they may be relied upon- to the uttermost. 

But the most significant sign of the inherent weakness 
and suspicion which surrounds the Group of Toil and its 
revolutionary following is the frank and positive refusal 
of Poland's revolutionary party or the Jews to co-operate 
or in any way identify themselves with them. Poland 
wants to cut away from Russia, but she would rather 
remain a Russian province than live under such a form of 
government as the revolutionists propose to establish. As 
for the .lews, it is not generally known that more than 
one-half of the Jews in the world live in Russia, and that 
they are closer in touch with the agrarians than any other 
class. As a rule, the} are "in trade," and it is to them 
the tilleTs of the soil look for means to tide them over 
when crops are short, and when their crops are ready to 
be marketed they pass through Jewish hands. In more 

ways than one. the Jews have I u the active business 

factor in Russia's commercial and monetary life since 
■about the twelfth century. When the kingdom of Poland 
was destroyed and the territory made a Russian province, 
Poland's leading statesmen, philosophers, financiers, his- 
torians and artists were .lews, and so it has remained 
through all the centuries. It is no wonder, then, that 
Poland will have nothing to do with the Group of Toil. 
In view of these facts, it is not difficult to understand 
what the Group of Toil -lands fur will finally be driven to 
the wall, for it preaches the gospel of lawlessness; of con- 
tempt for order; niter disregard for persons or property, 
and of all else that radical socialism and anarchy de- 
clares to be their principles of Government, which are 
based on atheism and free-love and society without con- 
ventions or standards of morals. 
* * * 

The Kaiser at il Again. 

The other nations of Europe are resting on their arms, 
so to speak", with no present element of a disturbing char- 
acter that is not local, except in the matter of Germany 
having quioih obtained a treaty of commerce with Abys- 
sinia. It is (eared in some quarters that it may develop 
into another .Moroccan affair, but the Anglo-French 
Moroccan treaty of offense and defense covers Minelek's 
country as well; besides, Italy is concerned, together 
with England and France, m maintaining the status 
quo in Abyssinia, and unless the Kaiser is determined to 
have trouble, none will grow out of the incident, for the 
trade of thai countrj could not be controlled to any great 
extent by Germany, because English and French money 
is behind the best enterprises, and would naturally domi- 
nate in the trade of that people, and Germany having not 
t lie slightest pretexl to interfere in the political super- 
vision of Abyssinia, then' seems to be no real cause for 
alarm. However, the Kaiser is being watched, unless 
be arrange with Monolik for establishing a German colony 
in bis kingdom. Should be ilo that, there would be war 
at once. 



Hunting Shoes 

$5.00 

HEAVY OILED CALF SKIN 
DOUBLE SOLES 9-INCH TOPS 

BFJTTAIN & CO., Inc. 

Everything in Hardware 
VAN NESS AVENUE AT TURK STREET 



,|.\ M'VKIi - 









n that 



in mi nin; 



- 

■ 

trust 
Hospital \- 
nnd the Prytanc 

- I will 1- 

tlic rtndenl hospital. Thus will ]»■ realized thi 
norpot 

\ Paget, long head of the department 

the Berkeley II--; Association, arnl with tl 

■:' the Prytanean Society raised the fnnda now des- 
tined f»r the equipment of the hospital. 

Jnst inch stndenl fa inducted by the University 

and mainta i ned by a fee required from the entire student 
body, are now maintained by Harvard. Princeton, Am- 
Alabama, Iowa, Illinois, and other American uni- 
■s. The students of Stanford University at 
quired to pay such a fee. The typhoid epidemics at Har- 
vard. Amherst, Stanford and Cornell have shown how 
invaluable such an institution becomes in time of emer- 
gency. 

A very considerable portion of the students of the Uni- 
versity of California are self-supporting, either wholly or 
in part. For such students a single illness, with the re- 
Baiting hospital fees, often means an expense as great as 
that of a whole year at college. Far too frequently such 
an illness puts an end to the student's chance of ever ob- 
taining a college education. Students of limited means 
whose homes are at a distance have far too generally 
hitherto been unable to have proper care in time of illness. 
Not being able to bear the expense of a hospital, they 
have lain ill in the unfavorable surroundings of a board- 
ing house, without proper food, nursing or hygienic con- 
ditions. The inauguration of the student hospital will 
relieve students of a heavy apprehension, and will prove 
of the greatest comfort to the minds of parents who send 
their sons and daughters here from home for a univer- 
sity course. 

The student hospital will be under the direction of the 
Professor of Hygiene. The nurses will be carefully selected 
and it is expected that, in management and method, the 
very best scientific ideas will be put in.practice. The situa- 
tion chosen for the infirmary is ideal. It is easily access- 
ible, and yet, situated as it is in extensive grounds, as- 
sured of quiet, sunshine and fresh air. 



QUALITY. 

Quality has met quality in the appointment of Varney 
W. Gaskill as the Pacific Coast agent for James Buchanan 
& Co., Ltd., of London, England. Mr. Gaskill will be 
the sole representative on the coast of " Black and White,'' 
a splendid Scotch whisky, Coate's " Plymouth " Gin, and 
the " Perrier Jouet " (special and brut) champagnes. The 
appointment of Mr. Gaskill reflects great credit on James 
Buchanan & Co., who are to be congratulated in securing 
his services. 



A wise man of Michigan has devised a scheme to 

regulate the price of money. The price of what we want 
to buy with it is a bigger problem. 

UNSWEETENED CONDENSED MILK. 
Peerless Brand Evaporated-Cream is ideal milk, collected under 
perfect sanitary conditions, condensed in vacuo to the consistency 
of cream, preserved by sterilization only. Suitable for any modi- 
fication and adapted to all purposes where milk or cream is re- 
quired. 



^ 



Low Rates 



TO 



Mt. Shasta, Yosemite Valley, 

Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa 
Cruz, Monterey. Pacific Grove and 
points in the northern counties 



Season Excursions 



Return limit. October 3 1 . Tickets on sale daily 



Southern Pacific 



The Grill 



J 



C.M.SOLARI 
Proprietor 

Formerly of Palace Hotel Grill 

911 ELLIS STREET, NEAR VAN NESS cAVE. 



Now Open 



Duplicating the Palace Grill Service 



Alfred £. Blake, M. D. 

Diseases of the Mouth and Teeth 

Office Hours, 8:30 to 9:30 t_A M.; 2:00 to 3:30 P. M. 

Office— 1 703 O'Farrell St., cor. Fillmore, San Francisco 

TELEPHONE WEST 4003. 



^OTEL 
ST. FRANCIS 



■% 



America's 

Model 

Hotel 



HAVE YOU SEEN THE 

St.. Francis 
Annex? 



200 Outside Rooms 

on the lawns of 

Union Square 

v Famous Grill Room Running Again , 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 190>j 




Balm in QUead. 

The Royal Insurance Company is one English cor- 
poration showing a splendid record, and which was not 
feazed hy the loss in San Franeisco. 

This office has not only adjusted and paid a large 
majority of its losses in San Francisco, but it has shown 
an increase of business, and has actually paid a dividend 
following the great fire. 

Although the Royal Insurance Company had rather 
more than five million dollars at risk within the devastated 
area, and may be expected to lose between * I ..M'ni.imo and 
$5,000,000 by the time all claims have been settled, its 
opulence is so great that the payment of the money will 
probably make no difference to the proprietors. For sev- 
eral years in succession thev had received dividends 
amounting to 38s. ner share: but a year ago it was decided 
to increase the interim dividend from 18s. to 20s. per 
share, giving a total of £2 per share for the whole year. 
This handsome distribution will almost certainly be con- 
tinued hereafter, San Francisco notwithstanding. At the 
recent annual meeting. Mr. William Watson, the Royal's 
experienced chairman, expressed the opinion that there 
would be no necessity to depart from the office traditions — 
namely, that dividend increases should be regarded as 
permanent. 

As with other companies doing a world-wide business, 
the Royal will have to face some heavy losses over San 
Francisco. Tin., chairman, in bis speech, pointed out the 
rastness of the ruin caused by the flames. While the losses 
would be heavy for all the companies concerned, he was 
sure that those of the Royal were not disproportionate to 
its business, and were well within the available reserves 
of the company. So the Royal, along with other com- 
panies, has shown that it was in what might be called a 
magnilicenl state of p re pa redness for such a disaster, un- 
expected ami unparalleled as it was. The chairman also 
said that every claim would be carefully investigated and 
the amount of loss in respect of the company's liability 
ascertained, and that the companies were, as was the usual 

practice, availing themselves of the besl expert and legal 
advice obtainable. He did not consider that the loss 
would wholly deplete the amount standing to the credit 
of the profit and loss. viz.. £1,325,903. In other words, 
while the Pacific Coast losses would lie very heavy, they 
had left the foundations of the Royal as secure a.- ever. 
We may point out here that there is a fire fund of £1,400,- 
000, and a reserve fund of 61,600,000. This does not in- 
clude the paid-up capital, or any of the life funds. One 
interesting fact was pointed out— that the business of fire 
insurance companies appears to have three phases. One 
is a cycle of poor years, then comes a cycle of good years, 
but all too short, and then some huge disaster sweep-; 
away the profits which some thought' to be inordinate. 
In connection with this we thoroughly endorse the state- 
ment of the chairman as to the wisdo £ accumulating 

as large a cash reserve as possible, so as to be ready for 
any contingencies that may arise. The payment of divi- 
dends to expectant, shareholders is one thing, but the 
work of a lire office is not only to receive premiums, but 
to pay losses, whether great or small. These come along 
year in and year out. and the steady and consistent in- 
crease of reserves is the only real rock of safety. They 
are the guarantee of the fulfillment of contracts, and keen 



up what is a company's asset of assets — its fair fame and 
good reputation. 

To those who are non-expert in fire insurance matters, 
Mr. Watson's confidence is likely to occasion some surprise, 
seeing that just before he spoke a loss of the greater part 
of 61,000,000 sterling had been incurred. Doubtless his 
remarks were to some extent inspired by sentiment, as 
tlie Royal has never yet had to reduce its dividend; but 
a calm analysis of the position shows that in this case 
sentiment and reason stand on the same footing. Had 
San Francisco been destroyed a year earlier the blow- 
would not have been so easily borne. At the end of 1901, 
after the final dividend had been provided for, there was 
a profit and loss balance of €756,456 — an amount prob- 
ably insufficient to settle the San Francisco losses. Dur- 
ing the past year, however, the Royal's business proved 
exceptionally remunerative, and on December 31st last 
the same balance had been increased to £1,195,274, al- 
though, as mentioned before, there had been an addition 
to the dividend and the considerable sum of £15,000 had 
been placed to the staff superannuation fund. 

A dividend of 40s. per share was paid in two equal 
installments. 

Happening at the moment it did, the loss will not be 
very severely felt. Taking the very worst view of the case 
possible, fully one-fourth of the huge profit and loss bal- 
ance will be in hand after provision has been made for the 
whole of the San Francisco claims — this irrespective of 
any profits which may be made during the current year. 
Those profits may be large or they may be small: 
but. with practically one-half of the year gone, it is safe 
to predict that on December 31st next the Royal will have 
more than I'.'iImi.ihiii to the good, after providing for the 
current year's dividends and wiping out the Californiaii 
loss. A larger balance is certainly not required, as the 
combined fire and reserve funds amount to .6:1,000,000, 
or within a few thousand pounds of the sum raised by 
premiums last year. In point of fact, the stability of this 
gigantic fire office has not been appreciably affected, and 
the ease with which payments amounting to several bun- 
dled thousand pounds will be made is certain to lead to a 
large increase of business in the United Slates and else- 
where. 



Robert S. Atkins 



has resumed business at. 



11 10 VAN NESS. AVENUE 

(NEAR GEARY STREET) 

Clothing 
Furnishings 
Custom Shirts 






•- 



illlMlr.i 



i:"M 



54,216 



661, 



Roral 



1,130 
1,156. 






I, 



1 1.'"- 



imitted i" the Insurance I 
ner of the State of New York, it is shown th 
total lose in San Francisco is do! bo great as has l»-«'ii 
guppot 

All joint stock lire and international and marine insur- 
ance companies transacting business in the S 
called on fur a sworn statement as to their lose 
fornia. The companies were asked for the gross amount 
of insurance involved in risks destroyed or damaged, the 
deduction for amount to be recovered from re-insurance, 
the deduction for estimated salvage, the total deduction, 
and the net amount of loss as shown by the records June 
30, 1906. The New York State companies, fort] 
in number, show the gross amount of insurance involved 
as $41,110,069, the re-insurance to be recovered, $10,- 
834,795; the estimated salvage, s?T.i:3T,183. and the actual 
amount of loss. $23,138,090. 

Returns from other joint stock fire and fire and niarin? 
insurance companies, eighty-four in number, show the 
gross amount of insurance, $80,423,704; re-insurance to 
be recovered, $22,130,167; estimated salvage, $11,358,- 
425; actual amount of loss. $51,983,111. 

The foreign companies, 32 in number, made thesi 
turns: Gross insurance involved. $101,302,533; re-in- 
surance to he recovered, $32,281,808; estimated salvage, 
$15,318,859; actual loss. $57,701,856. 

The gross amount of insurance involved by all compan- 
ies was $222,836,307; the re-insurance. $r,r,.2-l(1.771: sal- 
vage, $33,814/468, and actual loss, $132,823,067. 

The company with the largest net losses is the Hartford 

Fire of Connecticut, according to the report. Its loss is 

$6,186,701. 

* * * 

In view of the result of the Grand Jury inquiry into 
the affairs of the Eagle Insurance Company, it would 
not appear that the company is any longer entitled I" 
hear the name of the noble bird. The name " kite " might 
be suggested, but "turkey buzzard" seems to be more 
appropriate, as the roasting received is thus gently sug- 

£ estecL * „ „ 

* * * 

It was my unpleasant task to have to call upon the Ger- 
man of Freeport Insurance Company the other day, and 
the manner in which I was treated reminded me of the 
tone adopted by the night sergeant at the police station 
to an exotic vagrant. We have ceased to expect money 
from some companies, but we do look for politeness. 



McMahon 
Keyer <8k 
Stiegeler 
Bros. 
Inc. 




Van Ness Ave. at Ellis 
O'Farrell Street at Fillmore 



DEVINE AND THE BEFU0EE8. 

The disgraceful exhibition on las) Tuesday on the 
grounds ol the Saint Francis, during thje banquet to Dr. 
Devine, was engineered and carried out by the minioi 
the Examiner. Taking advantage of the easily inflamed 
ii- of a small minority of the refugees, the hired 
help of Mr. Hears! herded them together and then fore- 
gathered at the Saint Francis to jeer ai the assembled 
notables who were doing honor to a transient guest Had 
the anarchistic crowd come together spontaneously, the 
Bee "would have been great enough to bear, but the 
demonstration was deliberately engineered by the in- 
famous Examiner, and this is enough to make the blood 
boil. There is no calamity, no pitiable condition, that 
this newspaper degenerate will not stoop to take in its 
foul hands and attempt to make capital of, and with, to 
the detriment of the community. 

There is a probability that the feast, to Devine was 
in bad taste, and it is not to be wondered at that the 
camp dwellers found it a matter for complaint. Devine's 
management has not given the greatest satisfaction, and 
the platitudes indulged in by the feasters strayed so far 
from the truth that the best commentary is silence; for 
silence is charity. But that's another story. 

The question that should agitate the public, outside 
of the camps, is whether the Examiner is to be allowed 
to go mi advertising all the bad there is of us a-nd none 
of the good there is in us. Shall it be allowed unhin- 
dered to go on and raise tip insurrections, to cause strikes, 
to flaunt in the eyes of the world partial truths to our eter- 
nal disgrace. The people of San Francisco have it in 
their power to stop Mr. Hearst by stopping their advertis- 
ing patronage and their subscriptions. This is the most 
effective way of administering a rebuke, so strong as to 
make the incomparable self-lauder come to a full stop in 

his mad career. This course was spontaneously inaugu- 
rated and successfully pursued at the time when Hearst 
essayed to fasten the bubonic plague on San Francisco, 
and it then brought, him to his knees in double-quick time. 
Why not try it again? 




Palo Alto 



Forty Minutes 
After January 1st. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 190(3 



IS Tmg®(gly ®f Jaia© W®flsBn 

"Ah! when she was young," said the old nurse of Jane 
Welsh, "she was a fleein', dancin', light-heartit thing, 
Jeannie Welsh, that naething would have daunted. But 
she grew grave a' at once. There was Maistej Irving, ye 
ken, that had been her teacher; and lie earn' abooi her. 

Then there was Maister . Then there was Maistel' 

( ': dyle himself, and he earn' to finish her off like." 

Reader, if you followed tin- spirit of our last paper, 
"The Romance of Jane Welsh," you will gladly agree 
with the old nurse that Jeannie Welsh was "a lleein', 
dancin', light-heartrt thing." Nay; lew girls in this 
world, you will say, ever combined an intellect of a high 
order with spirits so redolent of the moorland, so in- 
formed with the wild, pulsating passion of 1 he sea. But 
now, in " The Tragedy of Jane Welsh" we have to see this 
lovely creature with face haggard and drawn, with lips 
full of bitterness and suffering, with a spirit crushed and 
suffocated, with a heart broken. We have to see the beau- 
tiful and beloved Jane Welsh, heiress and spoilt child, 
the victim of that ungodly institution, a loveless marriage. 

Carlyle loved her — in some fashion of his own. Again 
and again, when he implored her to marry him. Jane 
Welsh — whose heart was given to Edward Irving — pro- 
tested that she cared for him, but as a brother. Love 
him? Yes, with all the admiration, interest and curiosity 
which a wild and fantastic personality inspired; but with 
passion, with an ardent longing, with an insatiable hun- 
ger and thirst to possess him and to be always alone with 
him — No; a million times repeated, No! And when he 
broke down all her opposition — this Titanic force that 
was neither man nor angel — and when she was literally 
driven to marry him, she cried out to him: "Oh, my dear- 
est friend, be always good to me. and I shall make the 
best and happiest wife ! When I read in your looks and 
words that you love me. then I care not one straw for 
the whole universe besides. But when you fly from me 
to smoke tobacco, or speak of me as a mere circumstance 
of your lot, then, indeed, my heart is troubled about many 
things." All through the fiercely-disputed courtship 
between the young genius setting forth to conquer the 
world and the brilliant and beautiful young girl, she ,-au 
— and told him a hundred times — that marriage would 
mean for both of them remorse and bitterness. But he 
would hear nothing against his will, and the marriage took 
place. 

He took her away to one of her own farm-houses, a 
moorland post of isolation, fifteen miles away from any 
town, and there with one servant he began to conqtiei the 
world and trample on his wife. She saw nothing of him 
till towards evening, when he emerged, sour and morose 
from his books, to sit for a (cw brief minutes in her 
society before he retired to his own bed-chamber. All the 
inspiration she was to receive from him in her own literary 
ambitions vanished in the smoke from bis tobacco-pipe. 
He did not care any longer to hear her sing or (day. He 
asked for no more of her German translations: fawned 
upon her. flattered her, waited upon her no longer. Smol - 
ing his church-warden pipe, lie would sit in his higli- 
backed chair watching her scrub the lloor or clear away 
dishes, withoui a word of comradeship, without even a 
proffer of assistance. When the baker's bread "some, 
on his stomach." he told her so, and she sat up into the 
small hours of the morning learning to bake bread that 
would please him. When he needed aught Erom the town 
(fifteen miles away) he did not look from the window to 
see how the snow fell or the rain blew 7 before bidding her 
ride out and do his behest. Concerning the cause of this 
sudden and terrible change in him no man can tell, lie 
was dyspeptic before his marriage, and he was a 
writer before his marriage. Perhaps marriage dis- 
covered to him something of wdiich he was forever ashamed 



— something which made him hate his wife above all liv- 
ing things. We cannot tell. All that we know is this: 
he did not love as others love. 

There came to visit Carlyle the critic Jeffrey, not the 
most tender of men, and on his return to his home in 
Edinburgh, even he thus wrote to Carlyle: "Take care 
of the fair creature who has trusted herself so entirely to 
you. I in not let her ride about in the wet or expose her- 
self to the wintry winds that wdll by and by visit your 
lofty retreat. And think seriously of taking shelter in 
.Moray Place for a month or two; and in the meantime 
be gay and playful and foolish with her, at least as often 
as you reprove her to be wise and heroic with you. You 
have no mission upon earth, whatever you may fancy, 
half so important as to he innocently happy." 

Xo mission upon earth! Imagine the tempest in the 
-oul of Carlyle on learning that common politeness to a 
single woman, and all the pretty fooleries of love, were 
of more account than (be uttering of his mind to an age 
dying of Cant and Hypocrisy! Towards his wife, who 
had trusted himself so entirely to him, he maintained a 
truly Eastern attitude. She was there to cook his food 
and patch his trousers and open the house wdndows. so 
be it she did not leave him in a draught. What was one 
life, one woman's life, in comparison with the World and 
his Message? To kiss her, to fondle her hand, to share 
with her his thunderings against Cant and Hypocrisy — 
all this was a foolishness to the man whose blood was 
poisoned with dyspepsia, and whose soul was stricken with 
egoism. 

"They must be comfortable people," she wrote in her 

diary lay, "who have leisure to think about going to 

Heaven. My most constant and pressing desire is to keep 
out of Bedlam." 

So for long years she lived alone on the moors with this 
Loveless husband and one old servant — she who was intel- 
lectual in a manner uncommon with women, and whose 
life hitherto had been passed almost as a queen of a bril- 
liant circle. " Her drawn, suffering face haunted me af- 
terwards like a ghost," said Fronde. The tears wdiich Car- 
lyle wasted on Marie Antoinette blinded his eyes to the 
growing agony and the settling despair on the face of his 
wife, lie could cry out against Danton, against Robes- 
pierre, and against all the other villains of the universe; 
but against himself he raised no shout of indignation — 
until it was too late. He smoked his pipe, he drove his 
furious pen, he galloped lonely across the moors dreaming 
his wild dreams, but never once did he stop to look into 
the face of bis wife, soul to soul, and see that he had 



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when, in thi 
fnrm and and [<ondon, 

that followed al lient and 

And here he caused Fresh pain to the woman 
he had broken by tl 
He allowed himself t-> be flattered by thi 

of Ins day. and was in her house ale n as he ra 

in bis own. but with this difference- -in tli 

•rilliant, d and charming; in his own he 

was morose, lamentable, querulous and harsh. So, hav- 
Jeannie Welsh's heart, he proceeded to torture 
it with jealousy. 

With what high courage she fought out her destiny- 
helped by morphia — we have abundant evidence in the 
documents ;in.l journals which have non become the 
property of the reader. Her heart was broken. She had 
loved one man passionately and in vain — Edward Irving; 
• •nr> man' purely ami as the angels love — her fat!: 

And there was in Carlyle something which effectually 
saved her from hating him, something which she could 
not but reverence and hold in awe. We may feel that, as 
smoking and watching her scrub floors, he is a figure 
abominable and repulsive, but never once in the • 
his wife, who did not love him, did he appear oilier than 
a Cre out of the spheres. In the days of his poverty ahe 
had prophesied fame for him, reading in the deep violet 
ot his eyes, in the troubled forehead, and the torrential 
talk of the man a spirit uncommon to this world. And 
now that he had fulfilled her prophecy and was become 
the tempest of the age, she laid a little balm to her 
wounded soul and — wailing for death — was proud of him. 
What an end to her heart that craved to be fed with the 
fires of love, the whirlwind of passion — pride in the books 
of the man who called himself her husband 1 

Let us remember that it is possible without love to ad- 
mire, and that — with women especially — it is possible to 
reverence the hand which has laid all our love and happi- 
ness in the dust. So, when Thomas Carlyle — with no little 
pomp and ceremony — went to Edinburgh University to 
deliver his Eectorial address, Mrs. Carlyle asked John 
Tyndall (who accompanied him) to telegraph to her the 
result of that occasion. And wdien the message cami — 
"A perfect triumph " — she was glad and proud ; and to do 
him honor on his return, she began to make arrangements 
for a party of his friends and admirers. This heart- 
broken and once lovely woman, with her face haggard and 
terrible, set about arranging a party to lionize her hus- 
band ! The day came, and before she was to meet him 
again she went for a lonely drive in her brougham, taking 
only a favorite dog with her. 

She stopped during the drive around Hyde Park to put 
out the dog for a run, and shortly after a carriage struck 
it and slightly injured its foot. " She sprang out," says 
Eroude, "caught the dog in her arms, took it with her into 
the brougham, and was never more seen alive. The coach- 
man went twice around the drive, by Marble Arch down 
to Stanhope Gate, along the Serpentine and around again. 
Coming a second time near the Hercules statue, and sur- 
prised to receive no directions, he turned round, saw in- 
distinctly something was wrong, and asked a gentleman 
near to look into the carriage. The gentleman told him 
briefly to take the lady to St. George's hospital, which was 
not two hundred yards distant. She was sitting with 
her hands folded on her lap — dead. 



- 

drawn for US of tin' 

who in. .ii! n< d for h 

Haddington n 

mill liowed old man. with white hair, eyes from which re- 

■ r now absent, and a step that moves only with 
difficulty, na though he «. _ after him the (ham 

of a lil slowly through the rained 

archway of the abbey to the stone which is marked with 
the inline of 

JANE WELSH CAK1A IT. 

He stands there for a moment, silent and bowed. Then 
In- kneel-, and siavs upon his knees. Presently he bows 

ue to the ground, and ki-ses the stone again and 

again. After a little be rises .-lowly up from his knees, 

haggard and drawn, looks down upon the stone with a 

fjreal - _!i. and then totters out from the ruined 

abbey into the light of day. 

"Blind and ileal' llial we m Carlyle. "Oh, 

think if thou vet love anybody yet living: wait not till 
death -weeps down the paltry little dust clouds and idle 

dissonances of the moment, and all be at last 30 n mfullv 

clear anil beautiful, when it 1- too latel" Even Ibis strikes 
US, we tear, as the remorse of a heart which bad thought 
itself into literature; but we know that he sorrowed for 
Jane Welsh all the days of his life, and in repentance there 
is forgiveness. -Tid-Bits. 



PREDICTIONS. 

The idiot who edits the Examiner lias detailed some 
other idiot to dig up the old predictions of a lot of fools. 

\ s these is the "Liber de Predictionibus " of one 

Abbot Appian of Buonfeds, of Tuscany. Therein dire 
calamities are hurled, and after more than a century, the 
Examiner rehashes the collection with a scare-head read- 
ing ■• Prophecy Made 123 Years Ago Comes True." In 
allegorical language it was once told of an ass that it 
spoke Must have meant Hearst. 



Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup ' 

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2512-14 Sacramento Street., 
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30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 




VOIOBILE 



-T^L 



There has been some busy times in automobile circles 
during the past week. All kinds of interests have com- 
tnenced to work. The first and foremost has been the 
action taken by the inns and tours committee of the 
Automobile Club of California. Evidently acting on the 
suggestion of the Xews Letter, that committee has decided 
to hold a run. It is going to be a more pretentious affair 
than a little picnic outing. The committee has decided 
to hold a run to Del Monte. The start will be made next 
Friday, arriving at the rendezvous early in the after- 
noon, in time for the reunion which will be held in the 
evening. 

On Saturday there will be Gymkhana games at the 
race track. This is following out the idea of the sport in 
England. At the Kanel-a-Igh Club, London, recently, 
there were a series of games held before a large number 
of the society people. The games consisted of a bending 
race, where the contestants covered a course that wound 
around poles set in the course with a final dash for home. 
Then came a crawling race, where the automobiles were 
sent along on their high speed. This was followed by a 
tilting race, where the automobilist tried to pick off sus- 
pended rings from poles with spears. The one who had 
tin' greatest number of rings on the handle of the spear 
won the contest. The next event was amusing — it was 
called a hall race. The driver's assistant had to drop 
rubber balls in barrels as the machine shot around the 
course. 

One of the most trying events was called the police 
trap races. The competitors had to run their motor cars 
at a given speed designated by the committee. Clocks, 
watches and speedometers were covered up, and the 
drivers had to guess at the speed that they were going. 

On the same lines a very interesting set of games were, 
given in Eochester, New York, two weeks ago. Besides 
the events in the English set of games, they included 
an obstacle race, a potato race, and a water carrying race. 
This event was run by each automobile Btarting "IV with 
a bucket of water, and the "lie which had the most water 
in the bucket at the finish won. The balancing contest 
was held by running the auto up on a platform one and 
one-half times the length of the machine. The car was 
driven to the center, where it had to be balanced, then 
driven off on the other side. 

On Sunday the automobilisls will take in the seventeen 
mile drive. Tf the games are nut finished on Saturday, 
the programme will be continued on Sunday. The return 
home will he made on Monday. 
* * ' * 

The Automobile Club of California has done a splendid 
piece of work in getting the ferry lines over to the Marin 
County side of the bay to allow motor cars to use the 
ferry boats. The rules granting these extra privileges 
are about the same as those now enjoyed on the Oakland 
lines. Four machines will be carried at a time. All 
fires must be extinguished. Steam machines may go on 
under power if they have enough steam up, otherwise they 
will have to be moved by the deck hands. Gasoline 
machines may go on and off on their own power. 

These privileges mean a good deal to the tourins auto- 
mobilist of San Francisco. It opens up a new country for 
short runs that are as interesting as any in the State. It 
would he an excellent idea if the club held one of the 
many runs that the runs and tours committee are con- 
sidering over in that direction. A special boat could 



be secured for the occasion, which would be able to carry 
all that would wish to go. 

* * * 

The city of San Francisco is about to start work on 
its end of the proposed boulevard. City and County En- 
gineer Woodward has submitted his plans to the Board of 
Public Works, and that body lias ordered the publishing 
of a call for bids for the work. The seventeen thousand 
live hundred dollars appropriated last year is intact, and 
by the plans it is expected that the local enthusiasts will 
give five thousand more, which will make up the amount 
that Mr. Woodward states will be required to build the 
road. With the starting of the work by the city, the 

e tittee, of which R. P. Schwerin is the chairman, will 

take up active operations with their portion of the work. 
It is planned to continue the building when the city end 
is finished. 

* * * 

Some of the members of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia are discussing the proposition of having a club 
garage. The way the chauffeurs are handling the motor 
cars has been a source of annoyance to the owners and 
dealers. One prominent dealer in discussing the subject 
vesterdav said : " It has now come to a point where the 
owners and dealers will have to do something for their 
protection. I can safely say there are not over a dozen 
first-class chauffeurs in the city. Most of the men who 
are now running automobiles for a living have had very 
little experience. The result is, that it is a costly propo- 
sition to the owner, who blames the maker. I will always 
make allowance in price to the owner who runs his own 
automobile, for then I know that there will be satisfac- 
tion. He knows what is wanted, and does not go in for 
experimental attachments, which cost thousands of dol- 
lars to the owners in this city each year to satisfy the 
curiosity of these men. Then with a club garage it would 
lie possible to keep a perfect record of the work done on 
the cars after they come in after a day's run. As it is 
now. the owners of the garages do not dare to report a 
chauffeur who is neglecting an automobile, and not giving 
the proper cleaning. The driver will always find a way 
to have the car removed to another place, where it will 
be sure that he will not be reported. These are but 



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10 H. P. Touring Car 1100.00 
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» • • . 

i Sherin and Sam Napthal; have jn>i come into 
of their !■"> h. p. P - which but rei 

arrived in tin- city. They are enthusiastic in their p 
of the Pi ' ■-- machine. Mr. Thomas J. Lynch, "f 
Tonopah, !ia> also Becured a new machine, delivi 
which was made last week. 

» * * 

The Auto Livery Company has found its garage at Van 

ind Golden Qate avenue inadequate to accommodab 

its machines and their patrons, and steps have been taken 

to purchase an entire city lot to provide accommodation 

for increasing business. 

* * * 

Mt. E. W. Hooper, and party of five, made a run on 

.Sunday last to Petaluma in a mode] " S "' Oldsmobile, 
returning over tho Corte Madera grade, which was ueg< - 
tinted entirely on the high gear. This is considered as 
difficult a feal as the famous New York-Poughkeepsie run 
which was officially made a short time ago by the same 
model of Oldsmobile, excepting in the hitter case the high 
speed lever was sealed in the notch. Mr. Hooper expressed 
himself as heing willing to make the run again and un- 
der the conditions imposed on the Eastern trial. 

Mr. Arthur Macondray, the former society man. who 
has started an automobile stage line between Sanger and 
Milwood, Fresno County, reports that the venture has 
proved a success in every particular. The run between the 
two points mentioned is forty-eight miles, and mostly up 
grade — a rise of seven thousand feet heing made in 
thirteen miles. It formerly took a stage twelve hours 
to make this trip, but the Winton " K " now makes it in 
four hours. 



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There is some talk of a French 
firm shortly placing a good, re- 
liable, two-seated 8-h. p. car on 
the market, for which they pro- 
pose to charge $200 only! There 
is no doubt that, before long, 
motor-cars will be purchasable at 
far lower prices than those fixed 
at present ; but we fear we shall 
have to look far into the dim and 
distant future before we can dis- 
cern a car appraised at so ob- 
tainable :i price. 



In Los Angeles, the other 

night, a performing baboon broke 
loose and terrorized the audience, 
while the monkeys on the stage 
threw dishes and cut up some- 
thing dreadful. Must have 
seemed like a Newport dinner. 



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Walter S. Hale. General Manager 

Relocated at 547-57 Pulton Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Park 325. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 190G 



Dr. N. H. Chamberlain, of 
Oakland, is one of the most' 
prominent automobilists in Ala- 
meda County. He was the first 
president of the Alameda County 
Club, and held that position two 
years. Under his administration 
the club gathered the strength Eoi 
which it has ever since been 
noted. I>r. Chamberlain is rap- 
idly becoming the "Glidden of 
the West," for he does not hesi- 
tate to put his machine to long 
runs, and is always looking for 
a chance to get away on a trip. 
His latest was a ran to Santa 
Barbara, accompanied by Mrs. 
Chamberlain and their three 
children. He reports a delight- 
ful trip in every way. A camp- 
ing outfit was taken along, so that 
hotels were not depended upon, 
and camping was invited rather 
than avoided. 

Speeding his White steamer up 
a long grade in the Santa Bar- 
bara mountains, the doctor en- 
countered a life-sized, fully de- 
veloped specimen of the " auto- 
mobile road hog." Charity pre- 
vents the mentioning of his name 
or of the machine he was driving, 
but it was a 50 horse-power car, 
and the engine had become badly 
over-heated. The hog had 
stopped to give the engine a 
chance to eool off, and had driven 
his machine across the narrow 
road, so that no one could get by 
until he was ready to start. He 
did not feel called upon to give 
another man the lead and take 
bis dust. For fully twenty min- 
utes the doctor was kept waiting, 
and when the hog got good and 
ready, he started his motor. TTo 
was given time enough to got 
ahead, and then the White start- 
ed. When the first little town was 
reached, the White switched 
around a side street and passed 
the " hog " car, but later in the 
day, during the stop for lunch- 
eon, the "hog" machine came up 
and took the lead. The occu- 
pants seemed very much sur- 
prised to see Dr. Chamberlain's 
party ahead of them. Later, 
another long grade was encoun- 
tered. Although the doctor and 
his party had waited half an hour 
in leisurely dispatching their 
luncheon, after the other machine 
bad passed, it was again over- 
taken. This time it was drawn 
up alongside of a watering 
trough, and there happened to 
be room enough to go by. The 
engine was again being cooled, 
and the water tank refilled. 
AWiefher the "hoe" had conde- 
scended a little by this lime, or 
whether he was selfishly desiring 



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At Readville, Mass., races last month won the ten-mile handicap 
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"In winning this race the Columbia lived up to its great reputation of a year ago. '--Boston Herald. 

ABUNDANCE OF SPEED AND POWER 

Another car of the same model, stripped, made the fastest mile of any 
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to take the lead again, will prob- 
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know whether the steamer didn't 
wan, water, statin;.' they woulci 
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Borne time to comt 



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SAN JOSE — Hotel Vendome. Rendezvous for 
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FOR gasoline, sundries ana repairs at San 
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LOS OLIVOS— Hotel Los Olivos. Midway be- 
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1906 



• 









any ji 
jour"' in 

Amen ind the whole population 

was 01 t the flying Mtiadron from thi S 

The buxom French iri rls threw kisses with tru< 
Mid larishness. They harled Inn 
into the automobiles, until many vehicles looked as if tliey 
in a floral parade. 

* * * 

The automobil - I nlifornia b 

■ splendid example to the older clnb oi 9 
At a meeting held recently, the Automobile Club of 
Southern California decided to post signs along the roads 
out of Los Angeles for a hundred miles in every direction. 
They have already posted the road from I os Angeles to 

side, and now will take up the other directions. Oi 
nf the roads which will be posted is to Santa Barbara. 
This piece of work will be enjoyed by the San Francisco 
motorist who travels south. This action on the pari of the 
Southern club should be a lesson to the local enthusiasts 
to be up and doing. For months : fire, there 

was a lot of talk about putting up signs out of San 
Francisco, but that is as far as it ever got. San Fran- 
cisco citizens are always claiming that the men of the 
southern city have a hammer out for them, but it must 
lie acknowledged that, in things automobilic that the south- 
ern men are always giving the northern part of the State 
all the points anil yet win out. There is only one reason 
for this, and that is that they work together, and have the 
right kind of enthusiasm. When a proposition is adopted 
all hands get in and put their shoulder In the wheel. The 
automobile has hail a splendid boom in San Francisco 
since the late trouble, and it is up to the local enthusiasts 
to keep this up. They should join the club, if they are in it 
already a member, anil in every way possible lend their aid 
to the officers. Some kicks have been heard against the 
present officers. This is always to he expected, fin 1 those 
in power are always a mark. But kicking does not cure. 
[f the majority of the members feel that the right kind 
of work is not being done, they should not get in the 
way by failing to help out, and sending up a howl. It is 
their place to work the best they can with the officers 
until election times come around, and then put in men 
to their liking. But as long as they have put men in office 
they should stand behind them. It will be found that 
officers who are supposed to be lacking can make good, far 
beyond expectation, if only given the right kind of sup- 
port. It is mostly due to lack of support that good re- 
sults are not gained. 

* # H 4 

The Thomas machine driven by Mr. G. YV. Davis, of 
Buffalo, and the four-cylinder Oldsmobile, driven by Mr. 
E. Keeler, completed the 1,134 mile run for the (Hidden 
trophy with perfect scores. Of the thirteen winning 
machines, the 38-30 horse-power Oldsmobile is the cheap- 
est. 

* * * 

Charles C. Moore now holds the record from Santa Ortiz 
to Oakland. Answering a hurry call from Santa Cruz, 
he put his Thomas Flyer over (he road, which, in places, 
is none too good, in the remarkable time of three and one- 
half hours: "I have been motoring for the past live 
years," said Mr. Moore in regard to the trip, "but this is 
the most speedy run in all my experience. At different 
stages of (he ioad we did better than sixty miles an hour. 



mwiuM) hum 1907. 



We -iiiil not reduce the present standard 



of quality in tlu- 



Stamnni 

WRAPPED TR.EAD TIRE 

Bui reserve the right t<> improvt it if in 1 
can or if somebody tells us /""'•. 

Our prices will be determined August 1st. 



TTe Diamond Rubber Co., 

Akron, Ohio. 

108-1 10-112 Telegraph Ave., Oakland, Cal. 



The machine Beemed to be effected in no way by the trip, 

and a quart of water was all that was necessary to refill 
the radiator when the car pulled into the Oakland auto- 
mobile garage." 



The Czar must have heard how it worked in San 

Francisco. He has ordered the saloons in all the cities 
closed, and a general on every lid to hold it dow r n. 




Complete Victory tor Jones Speedometer 

Acknowledged to be the Most Reliable Speed Indicator in the World 

In awarding the Jones Speedometer the British Automobile Club's 

GOLD MEDAL 

the committee of judges- -fourteen scientific men—ruled that this instrument was the 

leading speedometer of the world. 

In competition with eleven speed indicating deviccs--in which every automobile 
manufacturing nation of importance was represented —the Jones Speedometer was the 
only instrument to "stand up" through the 2,000 mile reliability test. The award was 

made on the points of accuracy, durability, effect* of reversing 
car on the subsequent* accuracy of the instrument-, price, 
rapidity of response to variations of speed, simplicity of 
construction and attachment*, and steadiness of reading. 

The Jones Speedometer entered in this contest was selected from Stock 
by the committee of judges. 

JONES SPEEDOMETER, 125 W 32d St,., New York 

(Manufactured by Jon. W. Jones) 



Agents for Southern California: 
CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY CO. 
- Los Angeles, Cal. 

Agents for Northern California: 
LEAVITT & COMPANY, 
San Francisco, Cal. 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 



PLEASURED 
WAND 




'Tt&cbefjio miDtJ dot PA&sutrt 



A distinct novelty is promised at the Orpheum — Chutes 
grounds — this Sunday afternoon, in the polite juvenile 
comedian, Edward Clark, ami his "six winning widows." 
They will present a miniature raring musical comedy, in- 
troducing Mr. Clark's original creation, " The " Piker." 
Mi'. Clark is said to be a host in himself, while his rail- 
assistants are as graceful ami clever as they air comely. 
The announcement that Billy Van, renowned as " the 
assassin of sorrow." will be on the programme, is sufficient 
to pack- the Orpheum at every performance. Carter and 
Bluford, who offer what tiny rail " the act beautiful," will 
make their lirst appearance in this city, and, if Eastern 
reports are to lie credited, they will make an immense 
hit. Tin' Lucania trio. Cuban acrobats, will presem 
the equilibristic combination act that has created a sensa- 
tion wherever they have appeared, [da O'Day, the dainty 
singing comedienne ami banjoist, will lie heard in new 
numbers. The Marco twins, beyond doubt the drollest 
duo who ever faced the footlights, ami Ornheum Morion 
Pictures, showing the latest surprises, will complete a 

programme replete with novelty. 
* * * 

An Old Friend. 

Colonel E. 1). Price has been appointed general busi- 
ness manager of the new Interstate Amusement Company 
recently organized for the presentation of the musical 
anil dramatic works of American anil foreign authors, 
ami numbering among the subscribers to its $250,000 
capital a great number of representative managers, includ- 
ing Charles Frohman, Daniel Prohman, Al. Ifavman, A. 
L. Erlanger, Marc Kiaw, Frank McKee, William Harris. 
Tsaae B. Rich. S. F. Xixon. .T. F. Zimmerman. Joseph 
Brooks. William A. Brady. George Tyler. Henry W. Sav- 
age, S. H. Harris, George M. Cohan and others. A more 
fortunate appointment could not have been made, as 
Colonel Price is known from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
ami is one of the ablest managers in the theatrical world. 

An Enjoyable Occasion. 

"Mackenzie Gordon, assisled by Sir Henry Flyman ami 
Mr. Fred Maurer, were heard in a delightful sum; recital 
iii programme on last Saturday at the Hotel Rafael. These 
noted artists were heard al their best in the following: 

The Haendel Sonata in F major, by Sir Henry Heyman, 

and Mr. Fred Maurer. Fonlenaille's "( tlisl inat ion." f.alo's 
"Be Roi U'ys." and Pfeiffer's "M^ilgre Moi "— -Makenzie 
Cordon — the beautiful aria from Thomas. "Ah lion 
credcii." selections from Dvorak, Strauss. Wolff and Eteiss 

— Mackenzie Cordon. Romanze, op. 262, Carl Reinecke. 
dedicated to Sir Henry Heyman, Sir Henry Heyman and 
Mr. Maurer; (a) Where'er Yon Walk. Handel; (b) I 
Know of Two Bright Eyes. Clutsam : (c) Drink to Me 
Only, Old English: (d) My Love's a Butterfly, Johnson — 
Mackenzie Cordon, (a) Toeh Lomond, Old Scotch; (b) 

Border Ballad, Cowen — Mackenzie Cordon. 

There were 256 of the State's elite present. Mr. Tfa 1 - 
ton is again the subject of congratulation on his en- 
terprise. 



Phenix Insurance Company 

Of Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Now located in KOHL BUILDING, San Francisco 

Has Paid Over ft 1,600,000 of its San Francisco 
Losses. Adjustments Proceeding Rapidly. 



J. H. LENEHAN, General Agent, Chicago, 111. 
A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast. 



FALLS HACK AGAIN. 
The Police Commission, as appointed by Mayor Schmitz, 

is not up to the standard set by the nomination of Law 
and Wartield. Little of reform is to he expected from the 
new board. It is feared that it is too " practical " a board 
to do anything violently honest. It will never shine for 
puritanical rectitude. It is a doubtful proposition at best, 
only two or three of the members are credited with a very 
ordinary morality, and the balance of the new commission 
is devoid of any kind of morality at all. being horn with- 
out. In fact, the commission is slightly tainted, and 
Schmitz has fallen hack into the political puree, a la 
rotten. 



Workmen on the Portland and Seattle railroad re- 
cently exhumed several human Skeletons live miles below 
the village of Hover. Washington. In the hones of a 
hand were found four gold pieces of ancient vintage, tight- 
ly clasped. Scientists announce that the skeleton is not 
that of a pre-historic Rockefeller. 



Orpheum 



FORMERLY CHUTES 



Week Commencing Sunday Matinee, August 5th. 
Matinees every day except Monday. 

<_A VAUDEVILLE SYMPOSIUM! 

EDWARD CLARK and the SIX WINNING WIDOWS; Billy Van; Carter and 
Bluford: The Lucania Trio; Basque Quartet: Three Hickmnn Brothers; Ida O'Day; Or- 
peum Motion Pictures and last week of THE MARCO TWINS. 

Prices. 10c. 25c and 50c. 

Down Town Box Office at Donlon's Drug Store. Fillmore and Sutter Streets. Phone. 

West 6000. 

CHUTES and ZOO— -Open daily from !0 a. m. to midnight; admission 10c; chil" 

dren, 5c 



Bancroft <Sb Co. 



?21 Market. Street, 



^Real Estate= 



San Francisco 




PALO ALTO 



No Fogs 
No Saloons 
No Chinatown 



4, 1906 






BANKING 

Tie Canadian Bail of Contra 

CMiutOd th« Bank ot 
MEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
0*0 

IN YUKON TERRITOKY— Dawson anil White 

IN UNITED -Portland. Seattle and 

. the prlncl- 
in, Manitoba 

BANKERS IN I ie Bank of Kite- 

■ Id, Lloyds* Bank. 

Ltd., Tn« Union of London and Smith's 

l.i.l. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commer- 
cial Bank. 

San Francisco Office — 325 California Street. 

A. Knins. Manager. Bruce Heathcote. Assist- 
ant Manager. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000 

Paid-up Capita). $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000 
HEAD OFFICE 40 Threadneedle St.. Lon- 
don. E. C. 

Airents — New York — Agency of the L,on<]on, 
Paris and American Bank, Limited, No. 10 
Wall street. N. Y.; Paris — Messrs. Lazard 
Freres Cie. 17 Boulevard Poissonler. Draw 
direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

sic. CREENEBaum, Manager; H. S. 
GREEN, Sub-Manager; R. ALTSCHUL. Cash- 
ier. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building *at 710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 300,000 

Surplus 320,000 

Deposits. January 1. 1T'06 10,213.801 

James D. Phelan. President; S. G. Murphy, 
Vice-President; James A. Hooper, Vice-Presid 
ent; George A. Story. Cashier; C. B. Hobson, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, 
John A. Hooper. James MoffHt, Frank J. Sul- 
livan. Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Jas. 
M. McDonald. Charles Hoi brook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on ap- 
proved securities-. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, 
Far.^o & Co.. or exchange on city banks. 

Security Savings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 600,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 280,000 

Banking by mail a specialty 

Directors — William Babcock, S. L. Abbott, 
O. D. Baldwin. Jos. D. Grant, B. J. McCut- 
chen. L,. P. Monteagle, B. H. Pease, Warren 
D. Clark, James L. Flood, J. A. Donohoe, John 
Parrott, Jacob Stern. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. 

Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed. $3,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $700,000 
The bank transacts a general banking busi- 
ness, sells drafts, makes telegraphic transfers, 
and Issues letters of credit available through- 
out the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILENTHAL, 

Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., Corner Sutter. 

Assets ;s,500,000 

Paid-up Capital and- Reserve :. 1.750,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administra- 
tor, Guardian or Trustee. Check a counts 
solicited. Legal depository for money in Pro- 
bate court proceedings. Interest paid on bav- 
ings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per annum. 






BANKING 






Iji* ..i .hi.! 

il 

wlin I kit 
youngi - making. The 

engini ikon into tli.- 

of Nevada 
and An '"ii. i. ill.' heart of the 
Dreal Vi Dew rt, and 

shown ill.' works of tin- Ti 
River proj 

nads, milf- 
oil mil -lined i 

'" Tv. M.l a half!" one 

of them exclaimed, "In Eng- 
land wo would not have 

uch undertaking without 
twenty yea enaralinn." 

This was not British ultra-dbn- 
servatism; English engineers are 
as progressive as our own. Ft 
meant only what all good engi- 
neers know — thai the data abso- 
lutely preliminary to a large ir- 
rigation scheme take one to two 
decades to collect. The irrigable 
area, the size of the canal?, the 
height and strength of the dams. 
all depend on the volume of the 
water supply, which cannot be 
properh' determined in loss than 
ten vears. Not onlv does the 
flow of a stream varv with the 
season — it chancres its tactics, 
and perhaps its course, every few 
years. And with the knowledge 
of what it will do must sro inti- 
mate knowledge of the geology, 
meteoroloo-v and chemistry of its 
whole basin that mav take nearly 
as lonsr to acquire. — American 
Magazine. 



French American Bank, 



»lsn 



nntKomcrjr and Market Sn. 

Arthur I 
M illrnr.l. An. I 

ind An- 

. .■ kii.K l.iiainr-M. 



Member Stock 

and Bond Exchange. 

J. C. Wilson 

BROKER 

STOCKS and BOKOS. INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 

Telephone Temporary 815 KOHL BUILDING 



Fire Insurance Losses 



Will soon be paid. If the money is nol 
needed for immediate use in rebuilding, 
buying furniture, or replenishing itockjt can 
be profitably invested with the 

Continental Building and Loan Association 

at 5 and 6 per cent interest, the Associa- 
tion, however, reserving the riaht to limit the 
amount of any individual deposit. 

Offices; Cor. Market and Church Sts. 

OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Dr. Washington Dodge, 

President 



William Cor bin. 
Sec. and Gen'l Mgr 



ALGOHOJj FUEL TEST. 

Angus Sinclair has been de- 
signated as the chairman of the 
committee of the Automobile 
Club of America, which next fall 
will conduct an alcohol fuel test. 
The recent passage of the free al- 
cohol bill and its signing by 
President Roosevelt, has created 
much interest in the alcohol 
proposition, especially in view of 
the fact that the price of gaso- 
line is increased every fortnight 
or so, until now the consumer 
pays an average price of 25 cents 
a "allon. Harry Ford is one 
manufacturer who is particularly 
interested in the alcohol propo- 
sition, and is now at work on a 
carbureter from which he expects 
consid : :.ble. 



The German Savings &. Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $2,552,719.61 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1 .000.000.00 

Deposits June 30, 1906 $38,476,520.22 

F. Tillmann, Jr., President; Daniel Meyer. First Vice President: 

Emil Rohte, Second Vice President; A. H. R. Schmidt. Cashier: 

William Herrmann, assl. Cashier: George Tourny, Secretary: A.H 

Mullrr, asst. Secretary: W. S. Goodfellow, General Attorney. 

Directors--F. Tillmann, Jr'; Daniel Meyer, Emi! Rohte, Ign. 
Steinharl. I. N. Waller, N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bersen. E. T. 
Kruse. W. S. Goodfellow. 



J, D, Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and commission merchants 
General Agents 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

(Standard Portland Cement.) 

OCEANIC DOCK 

Also temporary office 1112 Broadway, 

Oakland. 



MANZANITA HALL, Palo Alto, Gal. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Every incentive to work and right living. Ideal 
dormitory system. One teacher to every five 
boys. Modern languages under foreign teachers. 
A new cinder track for the. coming year. Pre- 
pares more especially for Stanford or Yale and 
other Eastern Institutions. Catalogue on re- 
quest. 14th year. 

J. LEROY DIXON, Principal. 



2(5 



S.V\ T FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900 



Continental 
Casualty Company 

CHICAGO 

Writes all forms of Accident and Health 
Insurance. 

Saved all its records and is doing busi- 
ness as heretofore. 

Producers and all others interested address 

W. H. BETTS, 

Manager. 

54 and 55 Bacon Building, Oakland, Cal. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

of Philadelphia, Penn. 
Alliance of Philadelphia 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 6,922,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 

Monadnock Building, San Wrancisco. 

Pacific Surety Company 

of CALIFORNIA 
FIDELITY COURT AND CONTRACT 
BONDS 
PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Bonds for lost policies, bank books, or 
change of occupancy will be furnished by 
this Company. 

Paid-up Capital $250,000 

Cash Assets 428,000 

Officers: Wallace Everson, President; 
John Bermlngham, Vice-Presidrnt; A. P. 
Redding, Secretary. 

326 Montgomery Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co,, Ltd 



ALMSHOUSE PAUPERISM 
DECREASING. 

The number of paupers enu- 
merated in almshouses on Dec. 
31, 1903, was 81,764, and the 
number admitted during 1904, 
81,412, making a total of 1 < ;: J,— 
176 persons who were in alms- 
houses 'fin ing the whole or a pari 
of the year 1904. Of this total, 
111,811 were males, and 5 1 ,359 
females. The number enumer- 
ated included 58,444 males and 
29,320 females, and 1 1 u- number 
admitted, 59,373 males and '.".'.- 
039 females. 

The number of paupers enu- 
merated in almshouses in L880 
was 66,203, and in 1890, 73,045. 
But although the number of 
almshouse paupers is increasing, 
the increase lias no! kepi pace 
with the growth of population, 
and consequently the ratio of 
almshouse paupers to population 
i- decreasing. In 1880 ii was 

]:!■.' per 100, r population: 

it decreased to 116.6 in 1890, 
ami to 10.1.4 in 1903. In part, 
at least, this decline in institu- 
tional pauperism is due to 
changes in the treatmenl of the 
mentally and physically defec- 
tive poor, who in Eormer times 
were sen! to almshouses, bui are 
now cared for in hospitals or asy- 
lums, and also to the develop- 
ment of rationally organized 
charity, which strives I" make the 
poor self-supporting and to 
place destitute children in fam- 
ilies rather than in almshouses. 



Students in the Japanese 

colleges are becoming unruly and 
giving the police Berious trouble. 
They will be playing football 
ami saying " Rah-rah '." next. 



of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents, 

416 Jackson St. 



Banker Walsh, of Chi- 
cago, is to take his "hi place in 
the financial world. Pity he 
never took his proper place in 

San Francisco |1„. prison world. 



Phenix Insurance Company „~ 

of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

J. H. LENEHAN, General Agent. 

A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast. 

Temporary Offices: 

Polytechnic Hall, Corner 12th and Harrison Sts. 

Oakland 



The new City Hall, which 
cosi $7,000,000, has been con- 
demned. Such action could have 
been taken Mars ago withoui any 
impropriel v. 



Fire, Marine and Inland Insurance. 

Fireman's Fund 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Odd Fellows' Building, 
Cor. Eleventh and Franklin Sts., Oakland. 

Sansomeand California Sts., San Francisco 



They say that in Hnssia 

the spirit of revolt is " noi dead, 
hut sleeping." When it awakens 
Nicholas is likely to discover 
himself both 'lead and Bleeping. 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company 

Of London and Edinburgh. 
Combined Assets Over 
Eighty-Seven Millions. 
To the Public and Our Patrons: 

The North British will pay all fire 
losses just as soon as adjusted. Our of- 
fice for handling all loss claims is locat- 
ed in the Tribune building, northwest 
corner of Eighth and Franklin streets, 
Oakland. Our office for general fire busi- 
ness is at 2027 Sutter street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Tom C. Grant. General Agent tot Pacific Department. W. J 
Nichols, General Adjuster. 



Fire 



Marine 



New Zealand Ins. Co. 

Auckland, N. Z. 

Cash Capital $1,250,000. 

Reserves $2,025,000. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders 



3 1 2 California St. 



San Francisco, Cat 



G. J. STOVEL 



Temporary headquarters 



Bacon Building 



Oakland 



Phone Oakland 987. 



The phvsician who wants 

$25,000 for his attendanc 

Marshal] field is willing to take 
part of it in cash and the rest in 
the advertising that comes 
through discussion of his bill. 



Our clients and friends are requested to 
renew their policies and bring in notices 
of loss to the above address. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total assets ' 5.813.619 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,729.173 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific 
Department, 525 13th St., Oakland. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent. 

Bekins Van and Storage 

Cut rate Shippers 

Telephone Us 

W. and J. SLOANE & CO. 

Now Located at 

Van Ness and Sutter Streets, - San Francisco 









/„■!// II I) '.All 

Them u * 
■ 

London. I 

IrOad fri» 
) 

I tun- 
ed |iy 

Mr. Loirq lie Lobol about the 
i ••« link 

up the railway \- 

iiml America, ana attention has 
again been called t" 
bj the "ifiT •■! , and 

Seattle capitalists i" join in with 
London financiers to undertake 
the building oi this read as a pri- 
ntcrprisc al their own es- 
!ii return for a fifteen mile 
wide r-t rip of land along the 
American, English and Asiatic 
pari of the projected railroad. 
The Siberian section would run 
practically in a straight line 
from Kansk, on the Trans- 
Siberian, to the easternmost point 
of Asia, while the most westerly 
pari of America would be con- 
nected by railway down the Alas- 
kan coast to Seattle, Portland, 

San PrancisCO, and by direct 
line with Omaha. To Hide up 
these lines at the Bering's Sea. 

a tunnel. :!s miles in length, 
would have t,i be driven through 

solid rock. This work would he 

facilitated by the sinking of 
shafts on two islands on the line 
of the tunnel, and the excavat ion 
could proceed simultaneously 

from six i mints. 



The San Rafael constable 

from whom "Bogey" O'Donnell 
escaped so easily has qualified 
himself for a position on the 
Oakland police force. 



California Insurance Company 



Of Sjn Francisco 



• 



i ilifornfa Si.. S.F. 



Time foi o'. ing notice of loss or filing proofs will be extended 
on request. Our adjusters will make up proofs of all losses 
adjusted without expense to claimants. 

M. A. NEWELL. President. 
GEO W. BROOKS. Secretary. 



AMERICAN CENTRAL INSIRWCE CO. 
SAINT PAUL F. ft M. INSURANCE CO. 
MERCANTILE F. ft M. INSURANCE CO. 
LLOYDS PLATE GLASS INSURANCE CO. 

San Francisco City Business Office Removed to 

1Q1Q QI1TTPR 'sTRP PT between fillmore and 
I/l/oUllcrv olrvccl, webster streets 

All Losses Adjusted at the Oakland Office 
Telegraph Avenue and 20th Street 
1150 SAN FRANCISCO LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID TO DATE 
Christensen, Edwards ft Goodwin, Managers 



"\ 



Scottish Union and National Ins. Go, 



Of Edinburgh, Scotland 



Esl.bli.hed 1824 

Cpilal. $30,000,000 



AaeU over $45,000,000 



Applications for postal 

carriers and clerks' jobs are 
scarce in San. Francisco. And 
they will continue to be until 
Uncle Sam realizes thai a man's 
lime is worth more than a mere 
pittance. 



Tt is sincerely to he hoped 

that Mitchell is put on the 
ticket with Bryan. Tie can do 
no harm there, and his perni- 
cious activity alons; other lines 
will he curtailed. 



Temporary offices, 468 Eleventh Street, Bacon 
Block, Oakland, Cal. 



Pacific Department 

NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE 
SOCIETY 

of Norwich, England 



314 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
San Francisco California 



Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $639,542.25 

Pacific Coast Casualty Go. 

of California. 



E. H. TICKLE 



B. SAVART 



TICKLE & CO. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 
TINTING 



Temporary Address 
886 Sixty-first Street, Oakland, Cal. 



The missing whiskey 

seems to have taken it pslaec 

seems to have taken its place 

with the lost Charlie Itoss. 



Slow, but Sure. 

Comes over a fellow- 
spot. — Ex. 



Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, 
Elevators, Workmen's Collective, Vessels, Bur- 
glary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John 
C. Coleman, Vice-President; P. A. Zane, Secre- 
tary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deer- 
ing. Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel. If. E. Bothin, Edward 
L. Bravton, John C .Coleman, F. P. Deering, 
E. F. Green, I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. 
Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, Adoiph A. Son, William 
S. Tevis. 

Temporary office. 2324 Clay St., San Francisco, 
the bald Marshal A. Frank Company, General Agents 
for California. 

Kohl Building, San Francisco. 



Union Lumber 
Company 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER 

Railroad Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles, 

Split Shakes, Etc. Main Office, 206-207-208 

Crocker Bldg. Telephone Private Ex. 624. 

Yards and Planing Mills 

Sixth and Channel Streets, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Paper of Every Description 

A. ZELLERBAGH & SONS 

405 Jackson St., San Francisco. 



514 Eleventh St. Oakland 
114 K St. Sacramento 



113 N. Los Angeles St. L. A. 
54 First St. Portland, Or. 



Absolutely the Best French Laundry Work 

AT MODERATE PRICES 

E. CAHDEVAN, 

1925 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone West 1901 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 



THE UTILITARIANS. 

Count Louis Cavens writes to 
the English press to give warn- 
ing of the impending sale, pre- 
sumably for building purposes., 
of the famous farm of Mont St. 
Jtjn on the battlefield of Water- 
loo. It is also announced that 
the Hotel du Musee at the foot 
of the lion monument on the bat- 
tlefield, together with the mu- 
seum attached, containing a 
unique collection of relics, is also 
in the market. A Belgian jour- 
nal says that the offer made for 
the farm represents more than 
three times the market value of 
the property, and the intending 
purchaser desires to entn- into 
immediate possession. As. how- 
ever, the owner desires time t > 
sell the stock separately, the sig- 
nature of the deed of purchase is 
delayed for the present. It will 
not be long, apparently, before 
the whole battlefield is trans- 
formed, as the construction of a 
roadway across the center, with 
building allotments on either 
side, is projected by the local au- 
thorities. Comte Cavens, who 
lives in the district, has been in 
correspondence about Mont St. 
Tcan with several leading men o? 
letters, including M. Henri 
Houssaye, the British minister 
at Brussels, and various archaer- 
logical societies. 



ALLE SAMEE NEVADA. 

Mayor Tom Johnson of Cleve- 
land is not a great success in hie 
imitation of John Y. MctCaue in 
that statesman's famous act of 
saving " Injunctions don't go 
here." For a reformer to put a 
court paper in his pocket and 
then give orders to his men to go 
ahead and do, just the same, 
what the court has said they must 
not do unt : l the law and equity 
of the case have been judicially 
passed upon, is bad both for him 

personally and for his cause. 
With a certain section of his fol- 
lowers it may not harm MayOi 
Johnson to be declared in eon- 
tempt of court: but a? respect for 
the law, on the part of those set 
to execute the law, is felt by 
sober citizens everywhen lo be 
the crying need of these times, 
the Cleveland Mayor's defiance of 
court process must produce a 
bad impression upon his more 
judicious admirers. 



We Recommend 

GEORGE MAYER.LE 

German Expert Optician, now at 1115 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. His Optical 
Skill, knowledge and many years of practical experience are powerful factors to his great 
success. Mayerle's Eye Water 50 cts., by mail 65 cts. Mayerle's Antiseptic Wipers to be 
used when glasses blur, tire or strain the eyes, 2 for 25 cents. Eyes examined free. 



tt 



'■% 



( VACATION 1906. ) 



ISSUED BY THE 

California Northwestern Railway 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 
AND 

North Shore Railroad 

THE SCENIC ROUTE 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 

Giving full information in regard to 

Camping spots, the location, accommodations, attractions, etc.,of mineral 
spring resorts and country homes and farms where summer boarders 
are taken, with terms of board, &7.00 and upwards per week. 

To be had at Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street, San Francisco. Inquiry by mail will 
bring an immediate response. 






JAMES ACLER, 

General Manager. 



R. X. RYAN 
Cen. Pass, and Freight. Agt. 



J 



A Full Stock of 



^ 



\ 



Chipped and Ground Glass 

At 1818 1-2 POST STREET 
Pacific Window Glass Co. 



:# 



BACIGALUPI 



New Buon Gusto 
Restaurant 

1017-1019 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

Ravioli every day 



Real Estate Company 

John Partridge, President 
759 Fillmore Street San Francisco 



In Kanfiis the quest] i, 

"Does prohibition prohibit?" 
Here it is : " Does insurance in- 
sure?" No prize for the answer. 



"A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR- 
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRLIFSHE USES 

SAPOLIO 






190fi 









A Fair Offer 

To pi 

Dyspepsia 

there 

Slycozone 

$1.00 Bottle FREE 



&!% 



I his offer 
Write tod>. 



I M I « I > 

111 U«J 

•il lime. 



^^=^±x* 

64F Prlnco St.. New v„,k 

Writ* far boakUt en U>» RaUsqiI Tr.«tsi.nt 
ofduMU 



SCANDINAVIAN-AMERICAN 
SAVINGS BANK 

Chronicle Building 

Transacts a general 
banking business. 

Interest paid on de- 
posits. 

Special attention giv- 
en to the transferring 
of money to Foreign 
Countries. 



lam 

■ 
polite - ' in 

hi do- 
ctored llC :■ 
somewhat 

Then rrimly. 

the mercha 

you a litt Once upon 

a tin). 1 an Ami' n-ent t" hit 

:llil S.'lid : 

•■ ■ Lend me your rope.' 

■■ • 1 , .■,!.' . ,i the neighbor. 

... w ,,.- , 

■■ ■ B isi I want to use the 

'.self.' 

■• ■ What do you want 

with it?' the hi 

•■ • T want 1" tie np 
of water with it.' 

"'How on earth can you tie 
up five feel of water with a 



rope 



v 



•■ ' Mj friend,' -aid the neigh- 
bor, 'Allah is great, and he per- 
mits up to do strange thins? with 
a rope when we don't want to 
lend it.'"- .¥. A. P. 



MURPHY GRANT & GO. 

Wholesale and Dry Goods 

8th and Franklin Streets, - - Oakland, Cat. 

New goods constantly arriving and on sale 
at our temporary quarters, Eight and Franklin 
Streets, Oakland, Cal. 

The erection of a new steel structure will im- 
mediately be commenced on our old site, Bush 
and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 

Samuel M. Shortrtdge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1101 O'Farrell Street, comer Franklin Street, 
San Francisco. 

New Campi's Restaurant 

NOW OPEN 

French and Italian Dinners 

1569 Ellis St., Near Fillmore 



r 



: - T.r^ -"-'" -•- ; 



HARTSHORN 
.11 \ni ROI LERS 

Hood Uolkrm Jin RatUr* 



1 



See Spences 



Invisible, neatest eyeglass in the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL CO. 
1315 Golden Gate Avenue at Fillmore 



CHINN-BERETTA OPTICAL COMPANY 



Have Located at 



1821 Fillmore Street 

Between Bush and Sutter Streets 

San Francisco, Gal. 



OAKLAND OFFICE 



466 13TH STREET 



No lt''«// Orrr His Eyes. 

Uncle Abe, a grizzled old ne- 
gro, visited a zoological garden. 
He stood fascinated before .1 
cage containing a chimpanzee, 
and could not llp induced to 
move. After a while the animal 
came to the front of the cage, 
and Uncle Abe spoke to him. 

" Eowdy?" he said; "how- 
dy!" 

The chimpanzee not making 
any response. Uncle Abe chuck- 
led and winked at him knowing- 
ly. "' Oat's light, dat's de way 
ter do! Doan you nebbei gin 
tei talk. K( vim does, white man 
put er hoe in yer han' en meck 
ver wuk!" lie said. — Harper's 

WeeMy. 

* * # 

Oblivion No Rest. 

Mrs. McNag — This book says 
1 Iml in India it is the custom to 
bury the living wife with the 
dead husband. Isn't it awfully 
terrible? McNag — Yes. Even 
death brings the husband no re- 
lease. — NomaA's. 

* * * 

Enthusiastic Reception. 

Hi. Tragedy — Did they call 
for the author? Vil. Avne — Call 
for him? Why, they came up on 
the stage after him. — Judge. 



(^ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location "f principal place >■< business, San Pranotooo. California 
Location of works, Virginia City, Store] County, Nevada, 

Notice ie hereby given that at « mooting »f the Board of Directors, 
held on the Atri day of .i")y. 1900, an assessment (No 5) <>r ten (10) 
cents per shore was levied upon the capital stuck <>f (ho corporation, 

payable i icdlately In United State* gold coin, to the secretary, at 

Uto office of the company. BSD Burt Street] San Francisco, California. 

Any -t"L'k upon which this assessment slinti remain unpaid on the 
liith day of August, iniul, will bo delinquent and advertised for «a1o at 
publla auction, and, unless payment i* made before, will be «>ld on 
FRIDAY, the Slat day ot august, 1900, 'it 1 o'clock p. m„ io pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the est "f advertising and ex- 
pense! of sale. By order of tlio Hoard of Directors, 

JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Ollicc. 330 Bush street, San Francisco, California. 



The Maryland 



NOW OPEN 



Apartments or Rooms 
with private baths 

Page Street, near Laguna 

M. G. Lytton, Prop. 



Smiths Gash Store 



Mutual and co-operative, Now No. 16 Steu- 
art Street, San Francisco, just around the cor- 
ner from the old location. First store on city- 
front to resume Mail Orders exclusively. 



3C 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Ai oust I. 1900 



Gity Abstract Co., Inc. 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS 
69 City Hall Avenue 



Bank renewals will be given immediate 
attention 



-ALSO- 



Fire Insurance Corporations desiring in- 
formation as to record title of property 
covered by insurance can be furnished 
same promptly and on special terms. 



Dr. H. J. Stewart 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
Special course lor singers desiring church ap- 
pointments. 



STUDIO 1925 OCTAVIA ST., 

SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom 

Tailor 

2415 Fillmore Street., San Francisco 

Formerly of the Mutual Savins* Bank Building. 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

Get the Habit 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marvel at the results. The "Argus" has 
many eyes, you only two, so let us do the work for you. Send 
6ve dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spengler, Director 

352 Third Ave. - - - New York City 



THE CALIFORNIA DOOR COMPANY 

DOORS— WINDOWS 

16th Street Station, Oakland 



Fur the Present. 

" I see thai the problem of hofl 
In make Sunday school more 
popular docs not seem to need 
mi much attention now." " No : 
they are closed, and the picnic 

season is over." — Spectator. 

* * * 

.1 I hinl l 'haracter. 

" When JonaB steered the 

whale ii] i In- beach, what 

other Biblical character did he 
represeni ?" " Give it up !" "He 
was a sori of ' Paunches Pilot.' " 

— Spectator. 

* * * 

Treatments. 

'• That's mighty funny treat- 
ment Dr. Pillslmry is giving 
young Tomp] ins !" " 1 under- 
stand Tompkins broke his arm." 
" Yes : and the doctor is pulling 

Ins leg." 

* # # 

. I ( 'hoice of Evils. 

Ii was during an euidemic oC 
typhoid fever. " Do you boil your 
drinking water?" a man was 
asked. " N" ; 1 freeze it," w;i- 
the reply. " Well," said the 
other, " I'd just as soon have an 
aquarium inside me as a ceme- 
tery." — Harper's Weekly. 

* * # 

( 'urn paring Results. 

Jack— I asked Dolly's lath.-i 
for her hand the other night. 
Tom — So did I. What was your 
luck. Jack — Turin il down! 
Tom ( feelingly) — Well, it's bet- 
ter to In- turned down than 

thrown down. 

* * * 

Testimony to the Cont vary. 

Mistress — Arc vou a plain 

i k? Bridget — Well, mum, 

I Mlicer lliijiai) woi- al'tlier telling 
me thot mi eyes nor toike tin- 
hakes or Killarnev. — Harper's 
Bazar. 

* * * 

His Usual Luck. 

" Now, tlnn." saiil the leader 
of 1 1"- mob to i he horsethief, " if 
rou've got anvthing to say be- 
fore we swing you off, be quick 
about it." " N'othin' ter say,' 
replied the culprit, "except that 
this is me usual luck wid horses. 
1 lose he a neck." — Philadelphia 

Public Ledger. 

* * * 

She h'nrir What Sin* Wanted. 

" I should advise you by all 
means to have a pergola." said 
the architect. " IlM be nice to 
have one," replied Mrs. Jost- 
gollil. ■• but I don't see what we 
could <lo with one as long as 
there ain't any eanals aniunil the 

place." — Chicago Record-Herald. 



COOK 
WITH 
GAS 



Meals 

in a 

jiffy. 

Warm days 

a 

comfortable 

kitchen. 



Oakland Cas, Light and Heat Company, 

13th and Clay Streets, Oakland 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

San Francisco 
PAPER 

Temporary Office: 419 11TH STREET 

OAKLAND, CAL. 



FIRE-PROOF 

BURLAP 

For Tacking on Walls 

Wall Paper 

UHL BROS., 71 7 Market St 

Doing Business at the Old Stand 



CARNEGIE BRICK AND POTTERY COMPANY 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile 

Fire Clay, Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, 

Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile 
Fire-Proofing, Semi-Dry Pressed Brick, 
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe, Brick and Tile 
Mantels, Flue Linings, Urns and Vases, 
Flower Pots. All kinds of Vitrified Salt- 
Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Testa, Alameda County, Cal. 

Yards: San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, San Jose. 

Office, I Oth and Division Sts., 

San Francisco 



The Waldorf 

Hair Store Branch. 
3461 Sacramento Street. 
SWITCHES, WHiS AND HAIR ORNAMENTS. 
Phone, West 5606. 

John H. Ware 

Notary Public Commissioner of Deeds. 1936 

Fillmore street, San Francisco, Cal Teleph >., 

West Buns. At Western National B.mk n j 

to 8 p. m. 

DR. H. I. JONES 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, late Starr King 
building, will resume practice at his residence. 
228 East Sixteenth St.,Oakland. Phone East 82 



■ 









I / 

V 

i nil •, 

it iinv 

ill U- 

i .'it it 

tlw t 

would not !»• enrii lied from this 

luit I' Willis 

Mi»>r.'. Chief "f the Weatl 

lllli' 1" thl :■ - 01 . - ; 

ring tin- club, In' 
turned t>> a group "f friends and 
courteously bade them 
evening." II'' was recalled an.l 
fined. 

* » * 

('.,»/./ Prove 'i Lullaby. 

Magistral — Von are a© 
of attempting to hold ■■> 
trian up at two o'clock tlii* 
morning. Whal have yon to say 
in your own behalf? Prisoner — I 
am not guilty, your honor. I 
can prove a lullaby. Magisl rate 
You moan an alibi? Prisoner — 
Wtell, call it what von like bui 

my wife will swear thai 1 was 
walking the floor with the baby 
at the hour mentioned in the 
charge. — Chicago Daily News. 

* * * 
Qualified /« Serve. 

•■ There is something," he 
sail I. "that I have wanted for a 
long time to tell you. I am not 
rich, as you know, hut I am 
young, strong and willing to 
work. Miss Millyuns — Edith — 

I " "Oh," she cried, " I will 

tell papa about you. I think I 
heard him say this morninfr that 
he wanted to hire an office hoy 
with just the qualifications yott 
mention." — Judge. 

Natural History. 

"Mamma, what are twins?" 
asked little Bohhv. "Oh, T 
know," chimed in Dorothy, with 
all the superiority of an elder 
sister, " twins is two habies just 
the same age; three is triplets; 
four is quadrupeds, and live is 
centipedes." — Harper's Weekly. 

Writer's Cramp. 

The average writer's cramp is 
in the region of his poorly-fed 
stomach. — Medford Mercury. 

* * * 

Ought to Die. 

What is home without a mirth 
there ? — Spectator. 



Santa Cruz 

tie and entertainii 

thorns--! 



NEVER. A DULL MOMENT 



lEe Tallac 



Lake Tahoe. Cal. 



TV numrroui «n*ll M-* »-• t mrum ■ducrni 
ro*kr ihu ntart 

Headquarters for Rod Fishermen 

San FnnaietM are npeoiHt irmtrd Inwrif (or 
terms for their UnuKes. 

M. LAWR-ENCE &. CO., Tallac. 



UAGGC 

^HOT SPRINGS. SONOMA COUNU^* 

from Hut! i 

i i ■ 

I Tl - 

Bumid, 17::: Fillmore 
-l ol I 1' MUIX3RBW, Skafffrn, Oil 



Golf at Del Monte 

If you are looking for a pleasant week's 
vacation, remember the Golf Tournament 
at Hotel Del Monte. August 20th— 25th, in- 
clusive; special round-trip rates from all 
points in California; elaborate trophies for 
golf champions. If you don't play golf, 
there are a thousand ways to enjoy yourself, 
—riding, driving, fishing, tennis, and other 
attractions. Write for programme to 
GEORGE P. SNELL, Manager 
Del Monte, California, 

Klamath Hot Springs 

Klamath Hot Springs is one of the choice places 
in th<_- State for rest, pleasure and comfort. 
Fishing is first- elass. Hairs $2 and ?2.r>n pet- 
day; apply for information at the Peck-Judah 

< 'it., in Fourteenth sr.. Oakland; or Kdson 
Eros.. Beswick, ( !al 



Hillside Villa 

Novato, Marin County. 

Good room and board one dollar per day. 
Fishing and bathing. Driving, horse-back rid- 
ing. Six trains daily, Fare 70 Cents. Monthly 
tickets, -'■"> cents round (rip. Address M RS, 
FAJR.ISH, Novato. Marin County. 



THE F. THOMAS PARISIAN 
DYEING & GLEANING WORKS 

Cleansing Dainiy Garments our Specialty 

Our new monthly contract for gentlemen 
— 1 suit a week cleaned and pressed in- 
cluding small re-pairs 

$1.50 PER MONTH 

We clean ladies' and gentlemen's auto- 
mobile suits to perfection and return in 
24 hours if brought to 

1158 McAllister Street 

Oakland Office-Broadway-1 1 64 



"Til* Bu»y \Un'. Train " 

Appropriate in Its Name, 
Appropriate in Its Route, 
Appropriate in Its Character, 

"THE 20TH CENTURY LIMITED." 

This is THE century of all the ages. 

The New York Central -La Ice Shore 18 hour train be- 
tween Chicago and New York (the two great commercial 
centers of America) ii THE train of the century, and is ap" 
propriately named 

"The 20th Century Limited" 

A beautiful etching of this train, printed on plate paper 
24x32 inches, ready for framing will be sent free to any 
address on receipt of 50 cents by George H, Daniels, Man- 
ager General Advertising Department, Room 19-A, Grand 
Central Station, New York. 

C. F. DALY, Passenger Traffic Manager, New York. 



About Your Trip East 

When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall I go?" 
Let me offer a suggestion. The Missouri 
Pacific operates both Pullman and Tourist 
Sleepers through from California to Kansas 
City, St. Louis and Chicago without change 
of cars, which carry you through the world- 
famed scenery of Colorado by daylight. 
Dining and cafe cars on all through trains, 
service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and hand- 
somely Illustrated books of travel. 



W. J. SHOTWBLL, General Agent. 
1070 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAL. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1906 



G. Lederer 



'THE HAIR STORE" 



is now located at 2271 CALIFORNIA ST 



Hair-dressing, Shampoos, Wigs. Toupees. 



GERMEA 

FOR 

RREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE COMPANY, AGENTS 



O. F. Willey 
Company 



Estab- 
lished 
1855 



Have re-opened at 

19 Fell Street, 

Near Market Street* 
San Francisco Tel. Special 336 



165-167 13th St. 

Bet. Madison and Jackson Sts. 
Oakland Tel. Oakland 8062 



With a full line of 



Surreys, Runabouts, Etc. 



COME AND SEE 



II r Liked Taller. 

" When T was in the legisla- 
ture," said LTncle Rufus, as lie 
pulled oil' his boots and stretched 
his feet to the Hit. " a lobbyist 
for a railroad canie to mi' ami 
wanted my vote for a certain 
measure. 1 didn't like liis scheme 
ami told him so. Ho came again 
and ldnder hinted thai there was 
$500 in it for me. i goi mad 
and (old him to clear out. He 
cleared, bul before going, he 
asked : 

" ' Thole Rufus, what color do 
yon like besi of all ?' 

" ■ Y/aller ami be dumed to von 
I'm- a briber,' says I. 

•• Tw-o weeks later the old wo- 
man wrote me up a letter thai 
men had been there and painted 
the bouse, the barn, the cider 

mill and (be fences a b miiI i till 
yaller, and that without cost to 
me, 1 bad jnsl read the letter 
when the railroad feller comea 
around ami asks if \ couldn' 1 
possibly see my way clear to 
favoring the measure. 

" ' fl's a blamed fraud on the 
people/ says T in reply, ' bul 
when a man understands thai ! 

prefer yaller to any oilier color, 
and puts hisself out to give me 
yaller, and that yaller stands out 
so plainly that it can be seen 
from any part of the county, 
why, T can't do less than obleege 
him in return, and von can counl 
on my vote.' " — Baltimore 
I meriewn. 

* * * 

The Danger Line. 

Podd — 1 have finally come to 
i be conclusion that blonde- arc 
far more dangerous for men linn 

brunettes are. Purely — Are ibe\ 

more alluring? Podd — Well. I 
ean'l say as lo that: but a blonde 
bair on a man's coat stands out 
like a lighthouse. — Spectator. 

* * * 

Installment Plan. 

Brown — Did you ever get any- 
thing on the installment system? 
Cooper — Yes. T got my house- 
hold that way. First, I got my 
wife, then 1 got her father ami 

Iber. and now I'm about lo 

get her two sisters. — Nomad's. 



More Truth than Poetry. 

" Yes, sir," exclaimed the 
representative of commercial in- 
terests, "this pure food law is all 
wrong." "What's the matter 
with it?" "Matter? Why, man, 
if we couldn't adulterate the 
poisons we use in our fancy 
floods for table use. they'd be 
fatal." — Philadelphia Ledger. 



THE FLETGHER MUSIG METHOD 
Simplex and Kindergarten 

TAUGHT AT 

THE FLETGHER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
2251 Clinton Ave. Phone Alameda 1264 

ALAMEDA 

This system places ihe study o( music on a truly psycho- 
logical and educational basis: hence the drudgery is elimin- 
ated, and the pupils develop naturally and artistically, 
learning to express themselves, not merely to be copyists. 

The Fletcher Music Method has completely revolution- 
ized the old systems of teaching music to children. 

Residence 2251 Clinton Avenue 

Alameda, Cal. 



La Grande Laundry 

Or San Francisco 

is now located at 
234 12th St., San Francisco, Cal. 



EAT 



Moraghan's Oyster House 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

Now open at 1212 Golden Gate Avenue. 

You know our oysters. Wholesale and 

retail. 
A messenger always in attendance for immediate 
delivery of Oysters in bottles, Oyster Cocktails. 
Oyster, Chicken or Squab Loaves. 
6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 



Dr. Geo. J. Bucknall 



Office and Residence 



1121 Laguna St. 



San Francisco 



Emmons Draying and 

Safe Moving Company 

Wreckers, General Contractors 



318 Market Street also 


1060 Broadway 


San Francisco 


Oakland 


The most complete outfit 


n San Francisco 


Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 


SUPPLIES 


DYNAMOS 


MOTORS 


REPAIRS 


Century Electric Construction Co. 


18 Fell St,., near Market 


San Francisco 



Hiram W. Johnson 

Attorney-at-Law 

Has removed his office to 1905 
Webster Street, corner Pine, San 
Francisco. 




i u 



* W i 

.- 

•71 






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be « 



2 



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^ J S 

= - I 
c .9 - 

- — 

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"<] ^ a 

A to 



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"3 s 

*-= ° P, 

«£•§ M 






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8"E 




NEAVS ItETTER 







VOL. LXXII 



San Francisco, Cal., August 11, 1906 



No. 6 



IV S I.ETTKR U 

- 
k Marriott, at 90S Lincoln 

Applli >nd-claM mall matter lias been mado 

at thr Aim 
New York ■ 'Mi e — ( where Informal 

• rnhltl. E. C. EnKlami 
.v Co. 
All social Items, announcements, mining <1 a. id finan- 

cial news noti 

lleatinn. in the current number "f the NEWS 1.KTTKR AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER • !■• the Alameda 

ofih " n"i later tban Thursday morning. 



N*o sleeping on beats or flirting with servanl i 

fur the Russian police. Thej are too busy dodging bombs. 

More uf San Francisco and less of Schmitz an I 

still less el' Ruef, i- what the people hereabout are crying 

for. 

The good John I'. Rockefeller protests thai be 

loves all men — but Ida Tarbell is a Human, don'l you 
know. 

Isn't it Funny thai when a trusl or a rebater is 

put upon the witness stand all it ran remember is " I 
don'l remember." 

Tin' Illinois Cannon is roaring, bul it should use 

smokeless powder, so thai Taft could not locate its exacl 
posit inn mi easily. 

Russia seems i<> be printing her history in serial 

Eonn. Always "Id be continued" is at the bottom of 
every day's story. 

Rents in Berkeley have advanced 300 per cenl Bince 

the greal fire, which is a good way to advertise a town's 
greed ami selfishness. 

The reason why Chicago takes so little interest in 

Russian affairs is because about the same conditions obtain 
in that burg all the time. 

Some one has nicknamed Oklahoma " Bourbon." 

Xow gel the Kentucky end of the name, and things should 
£0 merrily for a new State. 

Six to seven feet in height is about tin' way the 

Russians run. Perhaps that is why it is hard for a I I' 

to kill one of them all over. 

It is an off day when Roosevelt does not protest 

that he is out of the Presidential race. MMhinks he doth 
protest too much to he not guilty. 

Dowie is hungry, and no raven has turned up 

with bread, which suggests that possibly the old gentleman 
is mistaken about that Elijah business. 

The next short-session of Congress will be snappy. 

So many members will be retired at the November elec- 
tions, and they will be fighting mad all the time. 

They say Roosevelt likes to hear people call him 

an exponent of' militarism, but he means war with a big 
stick or a shot-gun, and mountain lions in hostile array. 

It is dangerous to ride in a carriage along a street 

these days, positively reckless tojo^in an automobile, i 

foolhardy to take a street car. 

safetv. 



Walk or stay at home for 



Pittsburg report ety burglar," bul be 

charged with appropriating reputations in the millionaire 
quarter. 

If it should happen to !»■ Bryan and Cannon- 
well, our advice to the Nebraskan is, don't fool with the 
Illinois gun. 

Slowly, Imt surely, the C»r is -ending the social- 
ists an. I anan hists ai ross the great divide. May they never 
reincarnate in ibis world. 

The l.i orites in Parliament have not yet asked 

King Edward to turn Windsor Palace over to them for 

a labor union club house, bul they are likely to any day. 

San Francisco has demonstrated thai as large a 

volume of business can lie transacted in corrugated iron 

sheds a- in Bky-Scrapen, only that the latter are handier. 
The Czar owns more newspapers than any other 

man in the world, lie acquired them by confiscation, but 

be i- not running the plants just now. Advertising is 
slack. 

A local railway official Baya: "We are all at sea 

over the new rate law." All right — go to sea. hut re- 
member that extradition treaties go beyond the raging 

billows. 

London has a new daily called " Morning Major- 
ity." The majority of the stockholders will be beard from 
in the evening of their calamity — when they make good 
the deficit. 

. Governor Cummins is just now the boss of Iowa. 

with a Presidential bee buzzing in his bonnet, but it i< 

likely to buzz itself to death before it finds that White 

House hive. 

Suit has been broughl against an Eastern news- 
paper for putting the right shoe on the right man. and 
\ei he wants $350,000, because it lits so nicely. It is hard 
lo suil some people. 

England always proves her honesty of purpose by 

works. She agreed lo stand for peace and. immediately 
ordered that, work on three instead of on four Dread- 
naughts should he rushed. 

Dirt is flying in the rebuilding of San Francisco — 

also dirt is living in the political side of the work of re- 
construction, liui retribution will get in its work of 
destruction sooner or later. 

By practicing great economy, such as fetching his 

lunch from home in a napkin. Iltissell Sage managed to 
save about $1,500,000 a year. Wonder if he has gotten 
through the eye of the needle yet. 

Shipping manifests, railway bills of lading and 

bank- clearings do not indicate that anything out of the 
waj ever happened to San Francisco. We are get-there- 
Eli soil of folk in San Francisco, and don't you forget it, 
von miserable pessimists. 

If in the course of human events, "Uncle Joe" 

Cannon should land in the White House, you will be 
permitted to smoke your pipe where you like and dme 
in your shirt-sleeves. Joseph belongs to the "plain peo- 
ple!" He is a politician. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 11, 1906. 



PRESIDENTIAL NOMINA TIONB. 

The campaign for Presidential nominations 1'or the 
campaign of 1908 is on in great fury, but it may be in- 
terpreted to mean that nunc of those who arc now making 
themselves conspicuous will live, politically speaking, to be 
a factor of influence in the convention. Hitherto the pub- 
lic has permitted the interests of the country to be dis- 
turbed Jour or live months by Presidential campaigns, but 
it is not reasonable to suppose public sentiment will toler- 
ate men who are injecting their ambition into the chan- 
nels of trade and industry more than two years in advance 
of the established rule governing national political issues. 

Taft. and Bryan are largely responsible for -this con- 
dition of things, and each is beginning to be condemned 
1 iv his own party for trying to assume control of his 
party's machinery so early. True, Taft, by virtue of 
President Roosevelt's influence and patronage, has secured 
the delegations from the " solid South," but Ohio, his 
own 'State, and New York, Roosevelt's State, have already 
indicated that ''any one but Taft " will be their song, until 
voting is over in the nominating convention. At this 
moment. Speaker Cannon is the most popular of the sev- 
eral aspirants, but he will be sacrificed long before 1908, 
because of his persistent adherence to the Dingley tarifi" 
schedule. Like wild fire the sentiment for tariff revision 
is spreading all through the ranks of the Republican party, 
especially in the Middle West. In spite of the power and 
influence of the President and his army of office-holders, 
Governor Cummins of Iowa has not only had himself 
nominated for another term, but has full control of the 
party's machinery in his State. And not onlv so, but he 
had a platform adopted that declares so emphatically for 
tariff revision and reciprocal trade relations with other 
countries that the name of " Dingley " was not once men- 
tioned, the tarifi plank demanding that the party return 
to the Blaine-McKinley theory of customs duties and re- 
ciprocal treaties, which means free trade with countries 
that will exchange commodities with us upon that basis. 
Iowa has set the pace on the tariff question, and South 
Dakota has followed suit. Taft and Cannon have already 
declared against revision and reciprocal commercial agree- 
ments, whicli practically shuts them out of the conven- 
tion, unless they whip around and imbibe the "Iowa 
idea." 

Bryan, in the language of the street gamin, has recently 
"cooked his goose," and many of his hitherto staunehcsl 
supporters arc hiding in the rear of the procession. Pity 
and disgust quickly grew out of his assumotion of author- 
ity and his attempted interference with the details of 

the proposed banquet in his honor in Xew York upon his 
return. He wanted it to cost not less than $10,000. and 
the money raised by donations of .$1 or less from his ad- 
mirers. The committee of arrangements had already 
announced that the expenses would be defrayed by popular 
subscription. Bryan's plan has been responded to to the 
tune of just $3, and the committee's to .$800. There is 
still a shortage of over $9,000, and donations have ceased. 
Ifis best friends could not help condemning his impudence 
in attempting to conduct the affairs leading up to the 
banquet, and also of the programme of his reception at 
the wharf and escort to his hotel — and he 4,000 miles 
away! But what really put the lire in the oven to "cook 
his, goose" was his peremptory demand from a point on 
the continent that Roger Sullivan, the "wheel horse" 
leader of the Democracy in Illinois, be summarily dis- 
missed from the national committee, and all because Mr. 
Sullivan refuses to take orders from the Nebraskan and 
obey them without question. Mr. Sullivan is one of the 
best-liked and one of the most influential members of 
the national committee. Of course, Mr. Sullivan replied 
in a dignified way, but in language so strong and pointed 
that Bryan must realize that he was not well acquainted 
with his man. The Democracy of Illinois feels that it has 



been grossly insulted by Bryan calling its favorite worker 
and manager "unlit for honest Democrats to associate 
with." But so inflated has Bryan become with egotism 
that he sends word back to "my peopl»" that he is "as 
radical as in 1896, only more so," and that bimetallism 
is still a very much alive issue; and, moreover, from hotels 
in far-off Kurope he announces who he wants and who 
he does not want as leading delegates from the several 
States to the Presidential convention. That he will flatten 
out and be merely a political memory in the near future 
the signs of the times say there is no doubt, and as straws 
show which way the wind is blowing, so does the notice 
that, the Democrats of Bryan's own State, served on the 
Populists the other day, show whither the self-appointed 
"boss" is drifting. This notice told the Populists of 
Nebraska in plain words that they might go their own 
way — there would be no more "Demo-Populist" fusion 
or affiliation. 

Who the Republicans will nominate is still an open 
question, and one hard to answer two years in advance, 
but a straw points to Roosevelt because many of the lead- 
ing newspapers of the party are hanging onto him and will 
" take no other." This means that these papers have 
either bad a " tip " to not take his " renunciation of the 
throne" seriously, or they are doing him almost criminal 
injustice. The most astute politicians believe he is sin- 
cerely playing Taft. but that if Taft cannot rally the 
forces, he will take the rake into his own hands and gather 
in the nomination to himself — unless the tariff stand- 
patters control the convention, when he nor any other 
professional politician would want to be the standard 
bearer. 

It is pretty well settled, as near as they can settle any- 
thing, that the labor unions will organize a national fed- 
eration to include every kind of a labor organization, then 
fuse with the social Democrats and socialists and put a 
ticket of their own in the field. Just now it lies between 
Bryan and Hearst for the head of the ticket, but Mitchell 
of the United Mine Workers' Union is slated for second 
place in any event. Two things are conceded by the best 
observers of political events: No Itepubliean can be elected 
on a "stand pat" platform over a conservative Democrat 
or a dell'ersonian platform, and that any kind of a Re- 
publican on any soil of a platform would easily win out 
against Bryan, even if his declaration of principles were 
in accord with true Democracy. 



AN IMPERIAL CRISIS. 

Chamberlain is very ill: it is very probable that he is 
sick unto death. He is seventy years of age. At. the 
celebration of bis birthday in Birmingham something oc- 
curred, the truth of which has not conn' to light. Soni" 
say that he broke down and cried. Others that he had 
a lit. There is strong probability that he was stricken with 
paralysis, and that lie now lies on his death lied. Great 
issues bang upon his death or his withdrawal from public 
life. No less an issue is presented than the perpetuation 
of the British Empire, as we know- it. 

Chamberlain is an imperialist. He wants to weld the 
scattered parts of the tremendous realm over which Ed- 
ward rules into a compact and homogeneous whole. He 
desires the commercial and industrial interests of Great 
Britain and the Colonies to be solidified against the rest 
of the world. " Britons, hold your own," is his watchword. 
He is the only man with the energy and the compre- 
hension to undertake that task in England. 

If he dies, the Empire may still be consolidated, but 
on another basis. The great labor organizations of Great 
Britain and the Colonies, which are already in politics, 
may coalesce. Such action would bring about federated 
British possessions. But it would no longer be the British 
Empire. It would he a British social democracy. 



II. 1906. 






TIIK SPOILl 
lalmr 

'>- - 

rebuild enoug 

iinvlntN.il- to ] 

ratal -. but IV rdan rad tin 

nd though) by employing 

• niiiillv work <>n thi 
might have the institution Dear enough completion to 
accommodate itic hundreds ol young men anil 
who wished t" . ontinne thei 

At tin- outset, ii was determined to nuke skill and in- 
dustry tin- test for employment, which they did, no 
inp any one if he was a union or a non-union workman. 
The reconstruction work wont on rapidly, and all things 
seemed to be in harmony wiih all other t hintr^. Buildings 
were rapidly taking shape, and there was no lo 
a lingering doubt as to the completion of the buildings 
by the time the registrar was ready to enroll Btadentf 
in an evil hour a walking delegate arrived on the ground 
ami began to nose around tor an excuse to ordi i 
which he foninl in a handful of most proficient, skillful 
ami industrious carpenters who had no) committed their 
souls and bodies to the keeping of a labor union. That 
nough. They must be discharged in disgrace, under 
no less a penalty for disobeying the order of the walking 
delegate than complete suspension of work and prevent- 
ing the opening of the university until ils President and 
trustees surrendered to the union and pledged themselves 
to employ on I - union mechanics and laborers. 

But Mr. Walking Delegate counted without his host. 
He was not acquainted with the gentlemen who manage 
Stanford University. Very true, be did retard work for 
a while, and for some days it looked as if the university 
would have to yield to the union or give up opening the 
school for an indefinite period. But upon looking around. 
plenty of the best mechanical skill was found willing to 
complete the buildings in time for registration. The in- 
I'amv of the union is found in its perfect willingness to 
completely tie the hands of one of America's greatest 
institutions of learning and keep its doors closed against 
waiting students until its walls should crumble to the 
ground from old age, if a few thoroughly competent 
mechanics were not discharged because they had the man- 
liness and independence to refuse to wear the collar of a 
tabor union. How Ions. Lord, how long shall such 
things be tolerated by the spirit of the nation's Declara- 
tion of Independence? 



AT ONCE. 



A city should do as the individual. As a city has do 
feet, it should put forward the best facial or physical ex- 
pression possible. The first thing that strikes the stranger 
in coming into San Francisco is Charley Spear's flag- 
pole on the Ferry Building. This pole is lamentably 
crooked, the time ball arrangement is awry, and ils devia- 
tion from a straight line suggests the prevalent character- 
istics in the Harbor Front gang. Its crookedness is 
pointed out as an evidence of earthquake, whenever a 
stranger makes comment. The truth about, the matter is, 
that this pole became utterly tired of being the only 
straight thing around the depot, and of its own volition 
bent down to listen to the song of graft. Better take it 
down, and put up a new and straighter stick, and one thai 
will be satisfied with the company of honest trade zephyrs 
and sea-gulls. 



In I 

1 

poll t I 

.ii will not I. .in It uork foi i 

I bv i 'hin dig. Thus 

.iint InlM.r. \..«, however, 
il to relieve the strain. This is the 

Sikh. II. i- ;irm in_ . there 

■re at least a thousand in Vancouver. They say he is 
• II. nt workman. He certainly looks very imp 

turban, with bis black beard and bright, keen 

quiet and dignified, and would look verv striking a- 

n domestic. Then- me already sis hundred of him in 
California, and be is found to be a ory laborer. 

It will be interesting to see what the labor ag 

will do with this new and unexpected apparition from the 

Far Rast. 



THE RUIN8. 



tsn'l ii at t i wi- done about systematic 

dynamiting of the ruined walls of buildings, still stand- 
ing in the burned area? They are a menace to life and 
stand as gloomj monuments tor the delectation of rubber- 
neck touristo. Later, it will be impossible to remove 
these walls by dynamite because of the possible damage 
to new buildings, and the process of demolition will be 
slow. Why not gel busj n..« p 



( . I RNEOIE'8 RESPONSIBILITIES. 

Why not divorce all the rich females of Pittsburg from 
their husbands at wholesale, and then corral the bucks 
in i big, degenerate detention house. This would save 

untold treasure and slop scandal. Carnegie has much to 

answer for in this world and the next, for nearly every 

.me of bis erstwhile partners has turned out a scamp. Can 
it be that this is the result of early association, or is it 
badness acquired since the laird of Skilio skiddooed. 



With all her trials and tribulations, Russia has 

never failed to be there with the interest on her bonds. 

That is one thing |o her credit. Another good thing is 
the rebels' war upon the Government has exerted little 
or no influence in investment markets where Russian 
bonds are dealt, in. 



New York has a club called "Jolly Bachelors." 

The club gave a little excursion party the other day on 
the Hudson. A T et result: One man fatally stabbed, one 
woman killed outright, and twenty men thrown into the 
river. It was the best outing the club ever had, they all 
say. 



You would hardly believe it. but it is true that. 

the cash value of the gold output of Alaska and of the 
zinc mines of Southwest Missouri run about even. There 
are a lot of things thai do not glitter, but are just, as good 
as the yellow metal. 



"Freak prodigality'' is the way an Illinois news- 
paper puts il when referring lo the purchase of land for 
a public park. But il means graft, theft, steal and the 
like. The fragrance of the ruse does not change when 
von call it a load-stool. 



So Carl Brown lias been chosen to lead the People's 

parly into Ihc swamps, where the "' something-for-noth- 
ings" are said to grow on bushes. Has he? Hurry up 
with the re-building of Agnews. 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 11, 1906. 



IBs Rfcisto* ®f IF®ir®iMia AfMrs 



The Drago Doctrine. 

t'he Pan-American Congress at tiio Janeiro turns oul 
to be the most important gathering of diplomatists and 
statesmen ever held in this hemisphere. All the republics 
of North and South America were represented, and as 
a whole they stood for more than 150,000,000 people. 
The Washington Government sent Secretary of State 
Boot to the Congress as a sort of an extra delegate to ac- 
complish a eei-tain diplomatic work, but to his amazement 
he came face to face with Spanish-American statesmen, 
who proved themselves to be as astute and as Ear-seeing 
as the ablest of the diplomatic corps in Washington. In 
fact, they turned the tables and put the United States in 
a defensive position, which is likely to require a radical 
modification of President Poosevelt's interpretation of the 
Monroe Doctrine by strengthening it at the very [joints 
this country wants it to fie weak. In short, the representa- 
tives from the Spanish republics have invented an annex 
to be attached to the Monroe Doctrine called the "Drago 
Doctrine," and when its meaning was explained. Secretary 
Boot's mission ended quite abruptly. The real mission 
of Secretory Knot was to induce the Congress to indorse 
the policy of the United States in the Venezuelan case 
to submit it to the Hague tribunal for final settlement. 
He had no idea other than that the Latin States would 
heartily acquiesce, but when he was told that (he principle 
of the Drago Doctrine must be incorporated explicitly 
in the Hague international compact before the Latin re- 
publics would respond, he had nothing to do but withdraw. 
But to explain what the " Drago Doctrine " is. It is this : 
The decisions of the courl of last resort must he taken as 
the basis of negotiations, and the integrity of the court 
maintained by the Hague compact, ami not be subject to 
review by any international commission. The case in point 
which Secretary Boot was pressing is the stand President 
Castro of Venezuela has taken, which is. that the highest 
court of appeals and of last resort of Venezuela, having 
decided that the French and American asphalt company's 
claims were unlawfully and by false pretenses secured, they 
are not legally collectable. In other words, when for- 
eigners secure' valuable franchises by false pretenses, or 
invest money for fraudulent enterprises, they have no re- 
dress other than through the courts, and if the Supreme 
Court decides adversely, the matter is then ended for- 
ever. It was such ;i decision by the Venezuelan Supreum 
Court in the French claims and the asphalt company cases 
that caused the French squadron to sail away from Venez- 
uelan waters without seizing the customs houses to collect 
the debt by appropriating the customs duties. It was 
understood at the time that if the French would withdraw 
the United States would undertake to have trie coming 
Pan-American congress sanction this country's plan to 
have the ITatruc convention review and pass upon the de- 
cision of Venezuela's Supreme Court. But very much to 
Secretary Boot's surprise, he found that Venezuela's 
position had not only been indorsed by the several Latin 
States, hut thev had made its recognition a condition of 
becoming members as sovereign States of the Hague com- 
pact. This, then, is the Drago Doctrine — i. e.. unqualified 
denial of the right of any foreign nation to sit in review or 
pass upon the decisions of a Latin republic's Supreme 
Court — meaning, of course, when a citizen of a foreign 
country is involved in the suit at law. This is the first 
great diplomatic victory the Latin American statesmen 
have ever won, but it is far-reaching enough to last them 
during their national lives. Like the Monroe Doctrine, 
the Drago Doctrine is a fixed and immovable principle 
of international law in the Americas. 



Russian Rebels Weakening. 

Although the situation in Russia is still desperate, the 
hand of the Government is growing stronger, and the hand 
of the rebels weaker. The revolutionists ordered a general 
strike of all skilled and unskilled labor, involving on its 
face fully 500,000 workmen, but not more than 5 per 
cent responded to the call, and thev are little better than 
a disorganized mob. With tew exceptions, the army and 
navy are still loyal to the throne, and where they are not. 
it is not so much hatred of the Government, as it is desire 
for opportunity to loot. Not one army or naval officer 
of distinction or high rank has joined the rebels. In sev- 
eral of the rural districts, peasants are over-running the 
country, killing, burning and robbing, but they have not 
so much as the appearance of an organized force. Out- 
side of Poland, the revolution has descended into raids 
for plundering stores, banks, factories and railroad trains: 
still, there are several thousands of them. The revolu- 
tionists of Poland are honest and sincere in their efforts 
io add to the general disturbance that Poland may again 
be a separate kingdom, but none of the great soldiers 
or statesmen of the country are giving the movement any 
substantia] aid or encouragement, In fact, the struggle in 
Russia is now narrowed down to the socialists ami anar- 
chists on the one hand and the Government on thi' other, 
with the leaders of the insurrection devoting much of their 

time to avoid arrest. 

* * * 

Morocco Again. 

The storm center of the old world has again shitted 
to Morocco. An intense anti-French sentiment is spread- 
ing all over the interior, and the natives arc organizing 

and arming, tt is hinted that German agents have I :i 

inciting the people to refuse to acquiesce in the Algeciras 
treaty, which gave France the right of policing the coun- 
try and managing its public finances. Anyway, not in a 
third of a century have conditions in Morocco been so dis- 
turbed, and wdiat makes it all the worse is. that the leaders 
of the insurrection are telling the people that it is to he 
a religious war, and that it tiny do not hasten to join the 
leaders, the French will destroy everything that is holy 
and sacred to Mohammedanism. But the French Govern- 
ment is not idle. Tt is preparing for whatever may happen 

— whether it be in Morocco or on the- German frontier. 

\ot a few diplomatists think the strain is likely to be 

greater than it was before the Algeciras convention, and 

that if it does. France will take possession of Morocco 
and put it under military rule, whatever Germany's ob- 
jections may be. It is conceded that England and Spain, 
and perhaps Italy, would stand by France in the event 
the insurrection reaches the critical point, and a French 
army of occupation becomes necessary to maintain order 
and keep the channels of commerce open to the world. 



it 




% 



Vi 



chas.ke;ilus# co 
EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No branch stores — no agents 

Correct Autumn models, positively exclusive, 
by skilled designers. Notions that please par- 
ticular dressers. Garments of class. Quite 
conservative, yet, a little different, and difficult 
to ape. 

We can look every one who trades in this shop 
straight in the face, because we sell quality. That's 
the only kind of clothes we offer. Count us out on the 
doctored kind. We're not in the game. 

KING SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, Near Sutter, 

San Francisco. 



J 



I 



Hi l&uoMyaitt ©if 

■•■ 

■ 

Mi thinks the Lion and the I 

•I'. 
And Teddy Hunter— thai Wild \- 

•II his head, yet cannot break I 

Even Joe Cannon lifta a mild harangue 

ndemns the whole 8heeli 
His patriotic motives being thus: 
To save '• - - in and stand in with the ' 

The Learned Pig who. hither hurried hence, 
Props in the Chute and goes from Whither When< 
- 'ii in his travels may learn how They make 
Pate de foie gras at a slight expense. 

The Pig that inn with logic absolute 
The seven and twenty Scientists refute, 

Whom certain Alchemists can in a trice 
To Buttons; Glue and Chewing Gum transmute. 

Rut what of Those, the lovelies! and the best, 
Who into Breakfast Sausages are pressed? 

They squeal a moment ere the dim Ferash 
Strikes, and prepares them for another Guest. 

And many a Boarding House whose tender Prune 
Invites to Conversation opportune, 

There may the Feaster bow his head and say 
Grace before Meat. "Lord, render us Immune!" 

And as the simple Devotee to Steak 
Reflects upon the Progress of the Bake, 

Can he recall " The Jungle" and be calm — 
What! did the hand then of the Boarder shake? 

And as I linger in some Gilt Hotel 

(The Bill of Fare's in French, and it is well). 

I often wonder what the Packers buy 
Half so suspicious as the Stuff they sell. 

my Dyspeptic, clear the Plate that cheers 
The indigestive Dreamer of his fears ! 

Eat hearty — and To-morrow you may be 
Yourself with Yesterday's Seven Thousand Years. 

And when at last, through Sausages and Fate, 
You, too, may gather at the Pearly Gate 

And in your heavenly voyaging speak of What 
Goes forth in Cans — turn down an empty Plate. 



M \ \I>\ | 

TUB \ M 1/ 

•l wooden ill tjikc hit command 

. thus utilising hei 
naval militia hai 
for being drj land - m anything 

' ptam Bauer's intention to refute this 

1 he i an lake no I»-h«t method for do 
naking them perform the actual work • •!" seamen 

n n the Alert al sea. A da on a 

ship underway is wort! n than a who!,, war of armory 

drill on shore or at a wharf, for nun destined to !«■ a 

• for the navy. Rauer is following the right i 

to !»• hoped thai he will keep it up. 

TUB CELESTIAL VISION OF DR. DBVJNB. 

And n came to pass thai when the President's per- 

• aonal representative for the relief of San Francisco was 

gathered to his fathers la long time after thai event — 

Heaven be praised!) he went in course of things to the 

lodge of St, Peter. 

And ai first the Sainl looked al him with the air which 
he was wont to reserve for visitors from Washington; 
then having asked him upon what good deeds he claimed 
admittance to the realms of bliss, the Red Cross Enighl 
responded: "Upon my sufferings in San Francisco. They 
are a hard and suspicious people." he went on. " They 
do not take Eastern respectability ai its face value, i 
worked very hard, and was lucky to escape with a bare 
vote of thanks. The thanks were an after-thought, for 
they discharged me before they thanked me." 

"And why did they thank you?" asked the Saint. 

" Because my work was so great." responded the Red 
i Iross Knight. 

" But what was your work?" persisted Peter. 

"To see thai as \'v\v people as possible obtained any of 
the relief funds." explained the visitor. 

" But